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The Living Bridge

In North East India just north of Bangladesh is the province of Meghalaya. 

 

This is an astounding video that shows a (literally) natural way that local people have adapted to an incredibly flood-prone environment.  The organic building materials prevent erosion and keep people in contact during times of flood.  The living bridges are truly a sight to behold. 

 

Tags: environment, environment adapt, SouthAsia, water, weather climate, indigenous.

megan b clement's insight:

This video is so cool. It shows the indigenous people using the enviroment to the fullest. THese resourceful people do not even kill the tree when they use it to build the living bridges to cross over the rough waters. They actually have a community of living bridges that help the people to get from point a to point b safely. They keep the bridges alives by intertwinning them with one another to hold them up across the water. THe video itself is too cool, especially that people even thought of this!

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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 30, 2014 7:51 PM

The people of North East India have found an amazing response to bridge destruction during the annual monsoons. Instead of building bridges year after year, they turn to a more resilient and natural building medium. By spending generations entwining and weaving roots into a specific growth pattern, living bridges span the rivers. A living bridge takes years to accomplish, and families and villages dedicate their lives to taking care of them. The future of the bridges is dependent on the dedication of the youth. As the world's population increasingly moves to urban areas, the fate of the small villages and their natural traditions could be lost. 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 7:46 PM

This video is fascinating. not only does it show the ingenuity of man, but also its care for nature. when Monsoon season comes to the province of Meghalaya, the people use the roots, planted years ago, to form a bridge that allows them to travel back and forth over the river that was caused by the monsoon. If only the entire world could see this video and realize that there are many ways to coexist with nature and that if we take care of nature then it will help take care of us.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 2:30 AM

This is truly an amazing video. It shows the old traditions of the country and how close many of the people are to nature. It seems almost like a fantasy with the growing of these multi-generational living bridges. Especially when compared to many western nations who seem t prefer to keep nature to itself and build up human utilized lands.

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Gallery of Tombolos

Pictures of these rare sandbars that extend to a nearshore island.

 

Coastal physical geography produces beautiful landforms...these tombolos (some famous like Mont St. Michel) provide visual examples of numerous geomorphological processes. 


Via Seth Dixon
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12 of the Most Beautiful Bays in the World

12 of the Most Beautiful Bays in the World | Geography World News | Scoop.it

This is a great set of images that show coastal processes for a geomorphology or physical geography class.  Pictured above is Palm Bay, Australia, which also happens to show fluvial processes as well.  


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What An Amazing Dam. Wait... What's That? Are Those...? No Way!

What An Amazing Dam. Wait... What's That? Are Those...? No Way! | Geography World News | Scoop.it
Well, that is unexpected to say the very least. Wow.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 30, 2013 6:04 PM

I don't want to spoil this...click on the link and scroll down.  This reminds me that some species are adapted to survive in some of the most extreme environments.

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:20 PM
These are goats that walk on the walls of the damn. They lick the walls for the salt and minerals. The pictures are crazy looking at the goats walking on what looks like no walking room at all.
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Top 20 Earth Images

Top 20 Earth Images | Geography World News | Scoop.it
With five satellites scanning the globe, DigitalGlobe has collected impressive imagery of planet Earth this year. Check out their top 20 images here.

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Alex Schaerer's curator insight, December 5, 2013 11:50 AM

Incredible images of Mother Earth. It is all of our responsibility to look past our short term existence here to ensure that she flourishes for millenia for our future generations. 

Joy Kinley's curator insight, December 6, 2013 10:49 AM

The views of Earth from Space are fascinating.  Mountains, deserts, volcanoes, islands all seen from above.  My favorite is the city of Aleppo. What is yours?

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:31 PM
Five satellites have taken some of the most amazing photos of amazing places all over the world. The photos show the beauty of each place some places i never even knew existed.
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Typhoon Haiyan Before & After

Typhoon Haiyan Before & After | Geography World News | Scoop.it
View interactive before and after images showing the devastation Typhoon Haiyan has caused in Tacloban City, Philippines.

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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 7:01 PM

A great set of photos to show the great destructive force of a storm on coastlines. The Philippines are a bunch of small islands made up of primarily coastlines so this typhoon destroyed huge amounts of the country.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, December 8, 2014 1:16 PM

We know that natural disasters cause a lot of damage and personal loss but we don't really ever know how much damage is caused until we see it.  Even when we do see it if we don't know what it looked like before it really doesn't mean anything to us.  Using these before and after maps you can really understand how much destruction happened when the typhoon hit the Philippines.  You can see the loss of property, infrastructure and natural resources that were once there.  The loss of not only peoples homes, but entire neighborhoods wiped right off the map.  The remnants of roads can be seen but that is all they are, remnants.  The ability to see the before as well as the after really strikes a toll and makes people realize that this is serious and not just another storm for the people that live here.

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 9, 2015 2:51 PM

Such powerful imagery. I was tinkering around with the pictures and moving the scroller from right to left, keeping my eye on a particular house that stood before the typhoon. To keep scrolling to the left and to watch that image of the house completely disappear was absolutely surreal. It made the news of the devastation wrought by the storm seem so much more real; here I was, sitting in class and watching a home- a place where a family once lived, where lives had been and were continuing to be forged- completely disappear from the face of the map, never to return. I have lived in the same home for 15 years, and I could never imagine watching my home disappear in such a manner. The psychological impact of this devastation on such a massive scale is unimaginable, something that must be endured in order to truly understand- and, unfortunately for the people living in these areas, they now understand it all too well. The financial recovery from this storm will eventually come- perhaps not as fast as hoped, but it will, as always- but the recovery in human costs will take much longer. For those affected, many will believe that there can never be a recovery. Watching that home disappear in the blink of an eye makes me feel that they are probably right.

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Growing Diversity of Orange County, Calif., Shows Up in Food

Growing Diversity of Orange County, Calif., Shows Up in Food | Geography World News | Scoop.it
A Vietnamese immigrant inspired by the tastes of Mexico is par for the course in this part of Southern California.
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megan b clement's comment, October 13, 2013 2:14 AM
"The article discusses the fusion of two different cultures: Vietnamese and Mexican. It also shows how times are changing; our country is growing and becoming more and more diversified everyday. In this case you can see this in Southern California in their food alone. Growing up and being exposed to different cultures they do begin to blend, but still sticking to your original roots and traditions. "
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The North Pole is on thin ice

The North Pole is on thin ice | Geography World News | Scoop.it
While the world’s political leaders have left the negotiating table again without an agreement to reduce greenhouse gases, the Arctic has greater problems than ever – 75 percent of the sea ice has disappeared.

Via Seth Dixon
megan b clement's insight:

"The North Pole ice thinning, another over looked issue, has risen to the surface. Over the past 100 years 50-75% of the sea ice has disappeared. Old ice, which is formed over several years, has been replaced with new ice. New ice come and goes through the year it was formed. Travel has been accelerated in the North Pole due to thinner ice. It makes you think about if these circumstances worsen where will it leave the marine life or animals who inhabit this region. What will be the result in the years to come if we continue to over look this issue?"

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The Sockeye's Secret Compass

The Sockeye's Secret Compass | Geography World News | Scoop.it
After two years at sea, salmon find their way back to their native river by sensing a familiar magnetic field, researchers say.
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megan b clement's comment, September 10, 2013 12:51 PM
"In recent studies of sockeye salmon and their travels to the natal stream it has been shown that trout, who are amongst the same family of the sockeye salmon, have tiny iron crystals in the nose. These crystals allow the fish to detect changes in the earths magnetic field. Studies show that sockeye salmon can find their ways to the stream by memory of the magnetic landscape of the river. Its pretty crazy that they can use the crystals in helping them find their way to natal stream to spawn, from anywhere from 4,000 to 5,000 miles. It has also been studied that many animals use the magnetic fields to navigate their way. They swim and wait for the same magnetic signal intensity they remember from before.
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#thehubisnotaplayground Hits Penn State After Offensive Tweet

#thehubisnotaplayground Hits Penn State After Offensive Tweet | Geography World News | Scoop.it
An offensive tweet this afternoon sparked the amazing #thehubisnotaplayground Twitter hashtag.

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Denise Pacheco's curator insight, September 24, 2013 10:49 AM

I understand why she posted this because she probably was trying to focus/study, but she definitely did not need to take it to the extreme. I'm so sick of people being racist or making stereotypical remarks. Black people are not the only ones who are loud all the time. Spanish people and white people can be just as loud at times. And who cares if they are? Whatever happened to freedom of speech and expression? These minority students pay for tuition just like everyone else. So I feel like they should be able to do as they please and enjoy college because that's what it's all about at the end of the day. Sorry Ashley, if you don't like it then go sit/stand somewhere else. 

Rola Fahs's curator insight, November 13, 2013 10:37 AM

This link might be too provocative for a freshman or sophomore class, but when doing a unit on technology in a geography class, links like these that show how technology should not be used, is a perfect way to teach students a lesson on responsibilty. I would recommend this to all teachers that plan to use technology in their classrooms and show the affects when technology is used the wrong way. Technology is the best thing we have but it is also the worst thing. As teachers we can use this to instill responsibility in our students and show them what happens when things like that are said. 

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:39 PM
I think that this is complete ignorance. People who were never taught not to think before they think, she clearly was not. It was not only ignorant, but racist. I hope there was consequences to her actions.
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Powerful Nor'easter Coming Together

Powerful Nor'easter Coming Together | Geography World News | Scoop.it
A massive winter storm is coming together as two low pressure systems are merging over the U.S. East Coast. A satellite image from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite on Feb. 8 shows a western frontal system approaching the coastal low pressure area.

Via Seth Dixon
megan b clement's insight:

the picture shows the storm surge coming through to the North East and how the pressure builds.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 8, 2013 7:13 PM

This NASA "image of the day" of the Nor'eastern shows the scope and impact of the storm quite vividly. 

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Top 10 Beaches

Top 10 Beaches | Geography World News | Scoop.it
Top 10 Beaches from National Geographic...

 

I'd glady go to any of these gorgeous spots to appreciate the geographic marvels.  If you could only go to one travel destination (and had an unlimited budget), where would you choose to go?  How come?


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Pink Lakes

Pink Lakes | Geography World News | Scoop.it
Photo by Jean Paul Ferrero/Ardea/Caters News (via Exposing the Truth   Lake Hillier is a pink-coloured lake on Middle Island in Western Australia. Middle island is the largest of the islands a...

Via Seth Dixon
megan b clement's insight:

This is a photo of a pink lake that really exists in Western Australia. The color of the lake is pink due to the high salinity composition and the lake is filled with algae that cause the water to turn a pink pigment. I never even heard of this before nor if i saw this picture think that this is one of many pink lakes that really exist.

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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 11:44 PM

The pink lake, Lake Hillier,  located in Western Australia is stunning. The aerial view of the lake makes the lake seem unreal that is was is fascinating. What gives the lake its pink color is a mystery, but it may be from bacteria, but it shows how some places in the world are affected differently than others and it produces remarkable results.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, December 17, 2014 1:48 AM

Now this is bizarre.  A pink lake and no one is really sure as to why it is pink.  It is not on the top of my list of places to go swimming, that is for sure.  Although scientists don't seem too concerned about the safety of the lake for people but are curious as to what is causing the lake to be pink.  Thoughts on algea and bacteria levels or the amount of salt are included in the potential reasoning for the pink color.  Even on google earth you can see that the lake is in fact pink.  Even when scientists come to a conclusion as to what is causing the pink colored lake, as far as it isn't causing any environmental issues, I think that the lake should be left pink as a type of wonder of the world attraction for people to see.

Lena Minassian's curator insight, May 7, 2015 11:54 AM

This article caught my eye because I have never seen a pink lake before. This lake is on Middle Island in Western Australia. The lake is 600 meters wide but the reasoning behind the color of it is still yet to be determined. White salt rims the lake and the color may be caused from a low nutrient concentration and even just bacteria. The pictures of this lake are beautiful and there is not anything like it. 

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Iceland grieves after police kill a man for the first time in its history

Iceland grieves after police kill a man for the first time in its history | Geography World News | Scoop.it
Iceland made history this week, but not in a good way. For the first time since the nation became an independent republic, armed police shot and killed a man, startling a population accustomed to peace.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 5, 2013 8:58 AM

Draw you own conclusions about what this says about Iceland, modern violence and how this compares to your own country.

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:27 PM
A fifty nine year old man was killed after police entered his building. The man had a history of mental illness. Its the first time someone has been killed by the police here since 1944. The police apologized to the family this country has never really had any issues with the police at least up until now.
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Rapid Landscape Change

Rapid Landscape Change | Geography World News | Scoop.it
BOULDER, Colo. -- National Guard helicopters were able to survey parts of Highway 34 along the Big Thompson River Saturday. Here are some images of the destruction along the roadway.

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 26, 2013 9:29 AM

Looking at these photos reminded me of the video that we watched in class where water was rushing under a road and within minutes the road started to fall apart and eventually ended up completely divided in half. It is amazing how quickly the water can erode what is underneath and cause such damage to the road and area around it. Looking through the pictures it almost makes you nervous to drive on such a rode again because it all happens so quickly. It goes to show you just how powerful that water is to cause destruction like that. It is not easy to destroy a road like that. Again it goes back to the goegraphy. This type of thing doesn't just happen everywhere. Having a river like this presents the possibilities of something like this happening. Once is starts eroding it happens quick. A road that may look driveable one minute may be completely eroded 5 minutes later. It is amazing how a rush of water can cause such damage. Even if there are set systems to get the water through, sometimes the water rush is too powerful and breaks through and erodes the earth underneath anyway like we saw in the video in class. I have never seen anything like these picture before, and it really is amazing to see what can happen. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:59 PM

By looking at these pictures you can see that the water just completely ruined this road. The road sunk in and collapsed as well. Will this road ever be safe to drive on again if it gets fixed?

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:24 PM
National helicopters caught these pictures along the Thompson river while the water rages next to a road. The destruction of the water and its erosion had deteriorated the road.
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Twitter, Addiction, and Changing Social Norms

Twitter, Addiction, and Changing Social Norms | Geography World News | Scoop.it
megan b clement's insight:

"In the article they dicuss that Twitter is altering social norms. People on twitter write, post, and blog about things they would not normally do. We post inappropriate pictures of ourselves, write obscene things, and post pictures of drugs on the internet. It is as if all social and cultural norms that we normal abide by go out the window. "

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Kids get more exercise in smart growth neighborhoods

Kids get more exercise in smart growth neighborhoods | Geography World News | Scoop.it
Children who live in smart growth neighborhoods, designed to improve walkability, get 46 percent more moderate or vigorous physical activity than those who live in conventional neighborhoods, finds a new study.
megan b clement's insight:

"These smart growth neighborhoods are designed to help children to improve physical activity. They studied children after seven days and after anaylzing would try and get them to add ten minutes to their outdoor activity. By encouraging children and teens to play outdoors and get more excercise it helps them to maintain a healthy lifestyle. I support the idea to get children outdoors more rather than watching tv for hours or playing on their phones all night." 

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, December 7, 2013 9:33 PM

It really is amazing how much location can effect a persons life. In this article researchers did a study on children's physical activity. What they found was that children who grew up in smart growth neighboorhoods got 10 more minutes of exercise than kids who do not. Kids these days seem to be getting less and less physical activity with all of the technology we use now. So 10 extra minutes really adds up and makes an impact in a childs life. This all has to do with the location of where a child lives. It is amazing how much location plays a part in peoples lives without them even realizing. I bet no one would have ever even really though kids in smart growth neighborhoods would get more exercise if a study like this wasn't done. Studies like this may make parents more aware of where they decide to buy a home. It really is amazing the impact location makes on a persons life!

 

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The end of nature?

The end of nature? | Geography World News | Scoop.it
It isn’t the first time I’ve been to Usinsk in the very north of Russia, so I shouldn’t be surprised — but once again, I’m shocked.

 

An interesting look at some environmental issues in the far north of Russia (and when Russians think that it's far north, it's REALLY far north).


Via Seth Dixon
megan b clement's insight:

"The people of Usinsk have seem to have lost everything. Their once beautiful nature, land, animals, and people as well. Men who used to hunt have lost their supply, animals who lived here have died off, and people who have assisted to help clean the land have also become casualities to the oil spills. You can smell the toxic oil in the air and see the damage done over time."

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Denise Pacheco's curator insight, September 24, 2013 11:13 AM

It's horrifying to see such a large space go to such waste thanks to toxic oil spills. Business / people have no respect for nature. This space could have been used to build homes, start a new business , or even for agricultural purpose. The government should step in and clean this up because this land can help boost their economy as well if they put it to good use. It's mind over matter! They need to get to work on this ASAP!

Cam E's curator insight, February 18, 2014 11:35 AM

I never thought of the impact of on-land oil spills, usually it's only something I'd think occurred in the oceans, but I understand now that oil spreading throughout the soil and forests can have an effect just as disastrous.

James Hobson's curator insight, October 20, 2014 9:42 PM

(Russia topic 5 [independent topic 1])

Russia's blind eye to environmental regulation hasn't stopped at Lake Baikal. Sadly the Siberian landscape is being destroyed at an unimaginable scale by careless oil operations. Companies well known even here in the U.S. like Lukoil and Shell are running operations that aren't just harming the environment... they're eradicating it. Even disregarding all of the political tensions, it is shameful to note how one's morality, one's instinct's, one's sense of heart, one's common sense haven't kicked in by now. It's one thing for a nation to exploit itself, but when universal things (such as the environment) which are inarguably are ruined, there lies an even more severe sense of immorality and beyond-monetary "debt" owed to the rest of the world.

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Pass Atlas: A Map of Where NFL Quarterbacks Throw the Ball

Pass Atlas: A Map of Where NFL Quarterbacks Throw the Ball | Geography World News | Scoop.it

"Football’s analytics are evolving quickly. Thanks to new forms of data and emerging kinds of analyses, teams, media, and fans are gaining new insights into on-field performances."


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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, September 30, 2013 12:27 PM
Esri did a map of some stars successful and unsuccessful passes. I think it was Magic Johnson. Pretty interesting!
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, September 30, 2013 12:27 PM
Esri did a map of some stars successful and unsuccessful passes. I think it was Magic Johnson. Pretty interesting!
megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:42 PM
This article explains how people come up with the statistics that they can for each player. Using spatial thinking anaylsts can figure out where a player is best on the field. Where players "sweet spots" are on the field or where a player is most effective when playing. It is crazy how people even thought of this.