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Global flight paths

Global flight paths | Urban Places | Scoop.it
Transportation planner plots pattern of airline travel across the globe.

Via Seth Dixon
L.Long's insight:

Global networks

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 28, 2013 4:34 PM

This set of 9 images displays 58,000 flight paths from various perspectives.  What patterns do you see emerging from this data?  What does this tell you about the world today?


Tags: visualization, transportation, statistics, globalization, mapping.

jwilliams's comment, May 29, 2013 7:42 AM
Here is a video created of how to use Google Earth and airtraffic visual in a geography class. http://youtu.be/BXva8a1krMo

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The nature, character and spatial distribution of world cities and mega cities
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This Is the Traffic Capital of the World

This Is the Traffic Capital of the World | Urban Places | Scoop.it
There are only 650 major intersections here—but somehow only 60 traffic lights.

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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 7:16 PM

APHG-U7

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 17, 12:32 PM

I didn't realize that traffic had so much to do with politics.  In the case of Dhaka there is no winning with trying to fix traffic pileups on the roads that they do have.  People are always blaming everyone else too.  The politicians with cars blame the rickshaw drivers for being too slow and clogging up the roads, but won't do anything to fix it.  The thought would be to create designated lanes for certain types of traffic.  A lane for cars, a lane for motorcycles and a lane for rickshaws.  This would create three different speed lanes causing there to be more flow than there is in the current situation.  Taking buses isn't a very good alternative either since the bus companies are privately owned and would be quite difficult to get them to work with one another and lower the competition between them.  However with loans from other countries projects can be made to create underground subway systems to alleviate some of the traffic issues.  However doing the construction like anywhere else in the world will cause more of a headache for people on the roads because of even more traffic.  Something needs to be done to fix this problem, even if it does make a group of people mad.  The key to this is figuring out which group will cause the least uproar about the changes that will need to be made, or fix the existing traffic lights as well as adding more to the intersections that exist.  Not that added traffic lights will fix the problem but it will be a start in the right direction. 

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, November 18, 11:15 AM

As one of the world's largest growing megacities, its only evident that its city center would suffer common migration problems. While most megacities suffer from being overpopulated, Dhaka suffers from having world most congested traffic. Its interesting how something as simple as traffic lights have the possibilities of changing the way in which the people maneuver around the city. It's definitely different from what we're accustomed to in the states. Traffic runs from a set period of time making it easier to avoid being trapped in traffic all day long. I'd be interested in seeing how the people of Dhaka get around once the country develop highways.

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The Language of Maps Kids Should Know

The Language of Maps Kids Should Know | Urban Places | Scoop.it
The vocabulary and concepts of maps kids should learn to enhance their map-skills & geography awareness. Concise definitions with clear illustrations.

 


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Anita Vance's curator insight, June 30, 8:54 AM

This article helps give an early start to map skill implementation - even at the earliest levels.

DTLLS tutor's curator insight, July 1, 5:04 AM

Love this website. Not just this article, but the whole idea. Have a little browse around...

wereldvak's curator insight, July 6, 2:53 PM

De taal van de kaart: welke  woordenschat hebben kinderen nodig om de kaart te kunnen lezen?

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Aerial housing photographs show stark division between rich and poor in Mexico

Aerial housing photographs show stark division between rich and poor in Mexico | Urban Places | Scoop.it
A new advertising campaign is seeking to draw attention to the gap between the wealthy and the poverty-stricken in Mexico by showing how they co-exist in disturbingly close proximity.

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, June 17, 8:35 AM

And again in Brazil

http://civitasinclusive.wordpress.com/2013/03/16/paraisopolis-brazil-by-tuca-vieira-2004/

Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 3, 1:21 PM

The pictures show the deep divide between rich and poor in Mexico. These settlements are built to the point where luxurious condos share a wall with decaying slum housing. The roads do not connect the areas, showing how these places were constructed separately by to distinctly different communities. While the proximity between sections shows that sights, sounds, and smells most likely carry across the two sections, the rich area looks as if it has no idea what lies directly beyond their walls. The fact that the rich areas are literally walled off from the rest of the surrounding area says a lot about the deep economic divides found around the world today.

Jennifer Brown's curator insight, October 5, 9:42 AM

This photo is amazing! Not only does it show the great differance between the rich and the poor but it also shows how Mexicos social class exists. It looks like a before and after! The grass really is greener on the otherside.

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Primate Cities: Mexico City

http://geographyeducation.org/2014/05/05/primate-cities-mexico-city/


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Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 22, 12:24 PM

The concept of a primate city has both benefits and drawbacks for the country in which it is located. The large population of the primate city draws new technology and foreign investment into the country. Unfortunately, the large population of the primate city also leads to population and brain drain from the surrounding regions which can damage the overall economic and intellectual status of the country. 

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:45 PM

Primate Cities are furthered studied using Mexico as an example.

Primate cities affect movement by having a greater pull on migrants.

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, October 6, 2:49 PM

The spatial population of Mexico City is densely packed. The south-west side of the city or the Western Sector zone features upscale, wealthy neighborhoods. The north and eastern sectors of the city are densely populated and are the poorer sectors of the city. It is interesting looking at the city from a top-down aerial view. One can see that the wealthier western sector’s spatial geography is spread out more so than the poorer sectors and features more vegetation, possibly due to an environmentally friendly irrigation system. 

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New York City's Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts

New York City's Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts | Urban Places | Scoop.it
Two photographers set out to see what happened to small family businesses in New York City in a decade

Via Seth Dixon
L.Long's insight:

Changing nature of world cities

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Heidi Ames's curator insight, April 10, 10:49 AM

Awesome to use when studying the Northeast and Immigration.  How scenes change in a short time due to economy!

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, April 12, 7:28 AM

What a decade can do to a cultural landscape.

Jake Reardon's curator insight, April 21, 5:49 PM

To be honest I am surprised that "Mom and Pop" storefronts lasted this long in New York City. It just seems to me that as a city grows and rent prices go up the smaller store fronts would naturally be pushed out by larger conglomerates who would be more suited to handle the rent prices. Of course it is an old addeage of capitalism that as long as you offer a good product that consumers would be inclined to consume you can stay above water in even the most competitive locations. Although to me that would appear to have its limits. Perhaps the economic tides of the present in New York are that limit.

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Globalization and the Textile Industry

"On the 100th anniversary of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire, little has changed in the global sweatshop economy. Workers are again trapped and burned to death behind locked exit gates."


Via Seth Dixon
L.Long's insight:

A good example of dominance and dependence

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Kelly Collinsworth's curator insight, April 16, 8:42 AM

For Beth Manor

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 24, 11:28 AM

unit 6

Danielle Bellefeuille's curator insight, May 10, 6:16 PM

The sad reality of the new division of labor, we are moving backwards instead of forwards with labor policies and widening the gap between core and periphery countries. We need to stand up and advocate for fair trade. These countries rely on us for sources of unemployment, and we need to give them better wages, safer working conditions, and help them push pass this dependency, and grow into more economically and socially strong countries.

 

http://www.laborrights.org

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Ship-Shipping Ships

Ship-Shipping Ships | Urban Places | Scoop.it

"This is a ship-shipping ship, shipping shipping ships."  http://geographyeducation.org/2013/10/14/ship-shipping-ships/

 


Via Seth Dixon
L.Long's insight:

The two industries that are the real backbone of globalization are transportation and communication.  What has accelerated the pace of global interconnectedness is the scale of these devices and their ubiquity in facilitating massive global commerce.

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Jamie Strickland's curator insight, October 15, 2013 1:35 PM

First, this is a fantastic photo...a freighter shipping other freighters.  As my colleague Seth Dixon points out, this is a fantastic image of one of the important drivers of the acceleration of globalization in recent history.  

jim dzialo's curator insight, October 16, 2013 2:54 PM

Pretty sure that doesn't fit in the panama canal

 

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, September 10, 2:33 PM

#shippingships

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Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World

Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World | Urban Places | Scoop.it
Investigate for yourself the mechanisms of global trade

Via Seth Dixon
L.Long's insight:

Global networks

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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:49 PM

I love interactive maps because it gives thorough visuals of areas that don't always stick out.  This map is particularly cool because it's a view of the world's 50 largest ports that are used for international trade.  The ports themselves are massive and it is noticeable that the majority of them are in China and Southeast Asia where many of the world's goods are produced.  The U.S. has 4 ports on the list and while the NY and LA ones are expected, I was surprised to see Savannah as the fourth city. However, upon exploring it with the map, I can see how it is an extremely large port and is probably a main trade hub for the Southern U.S. 

The ports around the world are major contributors to globalization because trade is historically one of the biggest industries that connects countries all over the world through the exchange of raw and manufactured goods and materials.  Cargo ships are massive in size and can carry tons of goods around the world.  I remember going to the naval base in Norfolk and at the port, there were piles of cargo stacked six crates high being loaded onto a ship to be sent to anywhere in the world. Port cities are vitally important to international trade which is a major piece of the world's economy so the enormity of these parts is definitely necessary and really interesting to see in terms of design.

HG Académie de Rennes's curator insight, April 17, 4:00 PM

Ressource numérique interactive mêlant planisphère, routes maritimes, graphiques de l'activité portuaire et vues aériennes des plus grands ports du monde et de leur aménagement notamment pour la conteneurisation du commerce maritime. Une ressource tout à fait exploitable en 4e bien qu'étant en anglais (très peu de texte). On pensera aussi à la classe de terminale et aux DNL anglais.

Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, April 28, 1:57 PM

Un excellent site très utile lorsque l'on traite de la mondialisation


Pour aller plus loin

    - Site de l'Isemar (une mine)

    - Des statistiques très utiles

    - Les grands ports d'Asie orientale (conférence d'Yves Boquet, FIG, 2009) 

    - Conférence de Jacques Charlier : compte-rendu (conférence FIG 2013)

    - Le conteneur, une histoire de la mondialisation


FIG : Festival International de Géographie de Saint-Dié-des-Vosges


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The World's 25 Busiest Airports

The World's 25 Busiest Airports | Urban Places | Scoop.it
More than 1.4 billion airline passengers departed, landed, or connected through these massive facilities in 2012. Viewing them from above gives a sense of their gargantuan scale and global significance.

Via Seth Dixon
L.Long's insight:

Transport technology is a key factor that assists the operation of Global networks

 

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Mickayla Graham's curator insight, March 27, 4:14 AM

People and Economic Activity

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, September 10, 3:11 PM

I found it interesting that one of the most busiest airports was in the US, in Atlanta to be exact. A lot of the airports that are included in this list of 25 were located in the US. Also, I noticed that there are no busy airports in Africa, South America, and Australia. I'm wondering if it is because not many people wish to travel there due to the climate and environment.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, September 10, 3:26 PM

Is really good to know the busiest Airports because you would think that the number one is John F. Kennedy International Airport but it is not. The number one busiest airport in the world is the

Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.

 

 
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Welcome to 'Geography Education'

Welcome to 'Geography Education' | Urban Places | Scoop.it

Finding Materials: This site is designed for geography students and teachers to find interesting, current supplemental materials.  To search for place-specific posts, browse this interactive map.  To search for thematic posts, see http://geographyeducation.org/thematic/ (organized by the APHG curriculum).  Also you can search for a keyword by clicking on the filter tab above.


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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, September 10, 2:44 PM

This is the key to finding specific articles.

Helen Rowling's curator insight, September 28, 6:30 PM

Use updates to filter through and be collated in your most frequented tools.

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 18, 2:10 PM

Geography and current events

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Can You Name These Cities by Their Starbucks Locations?

Can You Name These Cities by Their Starbucks Locations? | Urban Places | Scoop.it

"Can you recognize it by its Starbucks locations?  Let’s find out. This quiz shows all of the Starbucks locations within the city boundaries of 20 domestic or foreign cities, and for each you must name the city depicted from four choices."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 24, 2013 1:19 PM

This is my favorite place-based guessing game since GeoGuessr (5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" and you have to guess where).  This isn't about knowing Starbucks locations, but understanding spatial urban economic patterns (just as this article showing the locations where McDonald's and Burger King will place stores also relies of understanding urban economic patterns).  In this Starbucks game you have to recognized the shape of the city, major street patterns and the economic patterns just to name a few.  This is one way to make the urban model more relevant.       


Tags: urbanmodels, economic, trivia.

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 24, 2013 6:53 PM

Unfortuntaley I wasn't very good at this game. I believe I ended up getting 5 answers correct. However what was intersting about this article was to see how each starbucks was placed in certain areas. There were so much more starbucks locations in city areas. The starbucks' also typically were off of main highways or corners. This is for similiar reasons to what we dicussed about dunkin donuts in class. People are only going to travel so far for coffee. If it is not convienent then people will go else where. It is not like car dealership where people will drive out of their way to look. For a coffee people on average may drive 5 minutes. Anything too out of the way people will avoid. That is why there are so many starbucks and dunkins so close to eachother. They are set up equdistant from each other in locations that are convient for people around the area to try and get them to choose their coffee. It is typical to put a coffee shop on the main roads like we see in the maps, as well as in numerous locations to convience the whole area. The more convient the shop the more money they will make. That is why there are some many locations so close to each other. It is interesting to see it visually on a map just how many locations there actually are. 

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Comparing Urban Footprints

Comparing Urban Footprints | Urban Places | Scoop.it

"This is a series of infographics (or geo-infographics) created by Matthew Hartzell, a friend of mine that I met when we were both geography graduate students at Penn State in few years back..."


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Blake Welborn's curator insight, May 20, 12:15 PM

This a conglomeration of maps that represent the physical layout and land use of some of the major cities in the world, color coded by region. 

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 12:49 PM

The comparison of urban footprints certainly puts a lot of factors into perspective.  Whenever I am in highly populated areas such as Atlanta and New York, I feel like the area is so densely populated. But shift over to Sao Paulo which is so much smaller than New York, but just as populated.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 14, 3:25 PM

This is an interesting way to graph out the urban footprints of various cities from around the world. This also shows how the United States has a number of the largest urban centers in the world. Along the top, New York, Chicago, LA, and Miami are massive compared to cities like Hong Kong. This shows how in the United States there are massive amounts of urban growth. Even in China where their population is one of the worlds biggest, Hong Kong a major city only has 7.1 million. In the United States, for the past century cities have been growing and this graph shows that.

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The End of the Nation-State?

The End of the Nation-State? | Urban Places | Scoop.it
With rapid urbanization under way, cities want to call their own shots. Increasingly, they can.

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, October 17, 2013 10:01 AM

The end of Soverign nation states has alot to do with how interact with other states into a more integrated regional economy. The global community is realizing its importance of woking together to mazimize on trade and technology building as an economic world effort. This would blur the lines of independent soverign countires and bring regions together for economic puprposes even redrawing regional lines. Cities want more autonomy on responding to urbanization and move more away from being identified as a nation state. It is the desire to listen less to what washington has to say and act more as an independent state which makes more decisons with the regions around it to mazimize on rapid city growth and the money making opportunities that a re created from a rapidly changing global community.

Keileem's comment, October 17, 2013 3:41 PM
Just end reading a book: the end of the nation state, but than in mind a non-democratic eu government.
Emma Boyle's curator insight, November 20, 2013 8:31 AM

Good examples: NYC, Washington DC, Brasilia, Hong Kong, London, and many more.

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Beijing's Facelift

"A government-initiated redevelopment plan will transform one of the oldest neighborhoods in Beijing into a polished tourist attraction."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 25, 1:48 PM
This 2010 video (and related article) showcases one of China's urban transformation projects.  Urban revitalization plans are not without critics, especially those who see the cultural transformation of a neighborhood they deem worthy of historical preservation.  This process is occurring all over the world (we've recently seen this in Brazil as they were preparing for the World Cup).  This is one of the videos that I've put into my interactive map with over 65 geography videos to share in the classroom.
 
James Hobson's curator insight, November 21, 9:42 PM

(East Asia topic 9)

As has been a recurring theme in past Scoops, the issues of urban renewal and gentrification can be felt throughout China and eastern Asia as well. This particular example practically acknowledges for itself that the changes occurring in this neighborhood are not at all aimed towards its citizens, but to tourists and outside industries. This same 'resetting' of a location happened in areas of Beijing just before the Olympics. China seems afraid to show its true self and can be seen as placing too much emphasis on the interests of outsiders than those of its own citizens. This may give economic gains, but the social, cultural, and historic holes the process creates can be felt for the entire future. It's like China's taking out a loan which logically cannot be repaid. 

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Developing World Cities and Population Density

Developing World Cities and Population Density | Urban Places | Scoop.it
Without a question, we are living in an urban era. More people now live in cities than anywhere else on the planet and I’ve repeatedly argued that cities are our most important economic engine. As a result of these shifts, we’re seeing megacities at a scale the world has never seen before.

Via Seth Dixon
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Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 27, 12:05 PM
المدن الأعلى كثافة بالسكان على مستوى العالم
Sally Egan's curator insight, June 29, 9:31 PM

Mega cities and the challenges they face for the future is focus in this article. Great statistics on populations and urban densities are also included.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 7:47 PM

APHG-U6

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Population pyramids: Powerful predictors of the future

"Population statistics are like crystal balls -- when examined closely, they can help predict a country's future (and give important clues about the past). Kim Preshoff explains how using a visual tool called a population pyramid helps policymakers and social scientists make sense of the statistics, using three different countries' pyramids as examples."


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Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 6:54 PM

This video proves how population pyramids can predict the current and future state of a country such as Rwanda.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:41 PM

Population statistics help show past, present, and future issues and concerns of certain areas ranging from health to women's' issues.

The movement of people in and out of areas affect population statistics and the landscape of areas either positively of negatively.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, September 26, 4:04 PM

Population unit

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The Most And Least Sprawling Cities In America

The Most And Least Sprawling Cities In America | Urban Places | Scoop.it

"Tracking changes in the shape of American cities over 10 years reveals which cities pack the most into a small space, but don't worry, sprawlers: Los Angeles shows you can change your fate."


Today’s nearly 314 million U.S. residents will expand to 401 million in less than 40 years. Wherever you fall on the cultural spectrum between country and city mouse, the fact remains that we simply won’t be able to use up resources the way we do now in sprawling suburbs shaped by car culture.  See also this infographic depicting those with the worst sprawl. and CNN Money's list of the worst sprawl and a discussion of it's impacts.  

 

Tags: density, sustainability, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities. 


Via Seth Dixon
L.Long's insight:

Urban  Dynamics

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Geofreak's curator insight, April 3, 1:35 PM

Ruimtelijk ordening, stedelijke gebieden

VS

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Can You Identify These Cities From Their Light Signatures?

Can You Identify These Cities From Their Light Signatures? | Urban Places | Scoop.it

"The light that a city emits is like its glowing fingerprint. From the orderly grid of Manhattan, to the sprawling, snaking streets of Milan, to the bright contrast of Kuwait’s ring-roads, each city leaves its own pattern of tiny glowing dots. See if you can ID these cities based on the way they shine."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 12, 9:59 PM

This short quiz of 16 cities combines several analytic components of geography that you won't see in more standard map quizzes for regional geography;  this draws on some similar skills similar to the map quiz that was based on identifying the city based on Starbucks locations.  Some recognition of local spatial patterns from previous map analysis can make this quiz easier but there are still some cities that you haven't ever looked at from space before.  Things to consider as you attempt this quiz:  Which of the four possible selections can you rule out out?  What enabled you to eliminate those selections (e.g.-coastal, scale, size, grid pattern, transportation systems, density, etc.)?  What does to layout of the city tell us about the planning and historical origins of the city?  Is there one urban model that best helps us explain the configuration of this city?     


Tags: urbanmodels, planning, density, urbanism, unit 7 citiestrivia.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, April 14, 11:00 AM

Geography education

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The Science behind Google Earth

The Science behind Google Earth | Urban Places | Scoop.it

"Google is using a new technology to automatically generate  3D buildings from 45-degree angle aerial photography made by overlapping passes of aircraft.  The aerial photos are combined to create 3D models."


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Annenkov's curator insight, April 16, 12:46 AM

This technology of visualization I would name "3D landscape"

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, April 16, 8:40 PM

Tecnología para generar imágenes en 3D con Google Earth

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2:06 PM

Google Earth has made the Earth easier to decipher and examine in a geographical sense of location and place by being able to see multiple layers. This article goes into the 3D designs and usage of aerial photography to create 3D images.

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Facebook connections map the world

Facebook connections map the world | Urban Places | Scoop.it
Facebook intern Paul Butler has created a detailed map of the world by mapping connections between people using the social network living in different cities.

Via Seth Dixon
L.Long's insight:

Global networks

 

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Louis Culotta's curator insight, April 27, 2013 11:39 AM

This is very cool...just like the internet map you posted. I have a seperate facebook page just to communicate back and forth to my friend nd his family in New Zealand in real time for free.

Thomas C. Thompson's curator insight, April 27, 2013 8:25 PM

This is a picture of our world and the real way that we are connected in real time from Facebook. It's amazing! Share this everywhere!

Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:23 PM

This map amazes me because of just how big Facebook has become after starting as a small site for college kids in the U.S. to connect on.  Now it is one of the largest contributing factors to globalization as it allows people from various continents to connect to others with a simple Internet connection.  It has helped people of different cultures come together and as we saw in class, it helps spread word of different political happenings that regular news media tries to hide from us.  

It's also really interesting to see how China is completely off the grid and so is central and Saharan Africa because in terms of modern day globalization, they are not areas that participate in many global affairs and with the prominence Facebook holds in today's world, the parts of the world that are missing are much stranger to us in cultural terms.

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Global flight paths

Global flight paths | Urban Places | Scoop.it
Transportation planner plots pattern of airline travel across the globe.

Via Seth Dixon
L.Long's insight:

Global networks

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 28, 2013 4:34 PM

This set of 9 images displays 58,000 flight paths from various perspectives.  What patterns do you see emerging from this data?  What does this tell you about the world today?


Tags: visualization, transportation, statistics, globalization, mapping.

jwilliams's comment, May 29, 2013 7:42 AM
Here is a video created of how to use Google Earth and airtraffic visual in a geography class. http://youtu.be/BXva8a1krMo
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40 more maps that explain the world

40 more maps that explain the world | Urban Places | Scoop.it
I've searched wide and far for maps that can reveal and surprise and inform in ways that the daily headlines might not.

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Terheck's curator insight, January 26, 5:58 AM

Une sélection de 40 cartes qui permettent de mieux comprendre notre monde.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 2:30 PM

When looking at this map there area few things that stick out to me and not just the colors. Fistly what I founf interesting was that South America in relation to where we live is quite different. For example, The US economic status is High Class at $12195 or more for most of the East and West Coast and then it is dull in the middle. These facts compared to South America where they are mostly upper middle class at around $3946-12185 and a portion of them are the lower middle class which rings in at around $886-3945.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 2:39 PM

 On map 33, it shows the religious borders map of the different religions that are occupying certain areas of the Middle East. The area of Baghdad and east is mostly Shiite Islam and west of Baghdad is Sunni Islam. What I found to be most interesting is that even though Jerusalem is surrounded by many different religions they still celebrate Judaism. They are religiously protected by its borders. There is some sign of Sunni Islam being practices within their borders but it is mostly dominated by Judaism. 

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Urbanology

Urbanology | Urban Places | Scoop.it

"What would your future city look like? Find out now by playing Urbanology online.  Urbanology is a game that examines the complex ways in which cities develop."  This is a great teaching tool since you are asked 10 questions that city planners need to answer that will shape the cultural and economic patterns of the city.  For example, would you remove an automobile lane to put in a bike lane or expand the sidewalk?   Based on your answers, it will tell you what city is most similar to the one you envision and what is your highest (and lowest) priority in laying out the city.  


Via Lucas Richardson, Seth Dixon
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Don Brown Jr's comment, July 29, 2012 5:23 PM
It seems Berlin is the ideal city for me since I have a high priority for innovation. How does a specialized city affect it longevity? Is it difficult to redesign, thus serving as a deterrent to innovation? Once you specialize, design and develop it for a certain purpose don’t you also make it venerable to change? (I’m thinking about Detroit)
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Picture quiz – do you know your world cities?

Picture quiz – do you know your world cities? | Urban Places | Scoop.it
Some city skylines are so iconic they are instantly recognisable.

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harish magan's comment, September 10, 2013 7:09 AM
It is very interesting to explore new cities and their sky views
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:41 PM

After taking this quiz I realized I could not really identify most of these cities. I could tell some of them were European from the look of the buildings. I also thought a few more were cities in the United States but there was only Dallas. In my opinion these cities are even more spectacular than some of our major cities. 

Lorettayoung's curator insight, May 8, 8:36 PM

is this ularu ?

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NatGeo Feature: Megacities

NatGeo Feature: Megacities | Urban Places | Scoop.it

"By 2030, two out of three people will live in an urban world, with most of the explosive growth occurring in developing countries. For a preview of the future, the last in the Challenges for Humanity series explores São Paulo, Brazil; Lagos, Nigeria; Bangkok, Thailand; and Hyderabad, India."


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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 11, 2013 1:12 PM

The mega city revlution has started and accroing to stastics its only to get more popular. The creattion of these mega cities has trasformed where people want to live, while also helping to bring nations stability though creation on these mega cities. It was said that with in 30 years more than 60% of the population will live in cities. Theses megacities are desirable, they help to stablize a country and have almost doubbled in number since the 1990's. It will be intereesting to see how the effects of megacites play out on the eniorment and ecnomny in the futre though.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 4:52 AM

Cities are attractive places to live. They host local entertainment, culture and are very lively.But with the increasing number of city dewellers in years to come i can see people easily forgetting their roots. This can also become a massive enviromental problems if citys start to expolde in numbers but the cities resources remain stagnet. Imagine a city like LA doubling in numbers the water supply in surrounding areas would be erraticacted.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:23 PM

Urbanization is the now. It is the up and coming world. That statistic is easily going to be correct in 2030. None the less, the world is conforming to its popular places. Where do you go when you need to shop, or to have a meeting? The city of course. Cities will take over the world and one day, no one will live in rural areas because there might not be any to even live in.