Urban Places
Follow
183 views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
onto Urban Places
Scoop.it!

Facebook connections map the world

Facebook connections map the world | Urban Places | Scoop.it
Facebook intern Paul Butler has created a detailed map of the world by mapping connections between people using the social network living in different cities.

Via Seth Dixon
L.Long's insight:

Global networks

 

more...
Louis Culotta's curator insight, April 27, 2013 11:39 AM

This is very cool...just like the internet map you posted. I have a seperate facebook page just to communicate back and forth to my friend nd his family in New Zealand in real time for free.

Thomas C. Thompson's curator insight, April 27, 2013 8:25 PM

This is a picture of our world and the real way that we are connected in real time from Facebook. It's amazing! Share this everywhere!

Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:23 PM

This map amazes me because of just how big Facebook has become after starting as a small site for college kids in the U.S. to connect on.  Now it is one of the largest contributing factors to globalization as it allows people from various continents to connect to others with a simple Internet connection.  It has helped people of different cultures come together and as we saw in class, it helps spread word of different political happenings that regular news media tries to hide from us.  

It's also really interesting to see how China is completely off the grid and so is central and Saharan Africa because in terms of modern day globalization, they are not areas that participate in many global affairs and with the prominence Facebook holds in today's world, the parts of the world that are missing are much stranger to us in cultural terms.

From around the web

Urban Places
The nature, character and spatial distribution of world cities and mega cities
Curated by L.Long
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by L.Long
Scoop.it!

Sydney's economic centre drifts away from the CBD towards Concord

Sydney's economic centre drifts away from the CBD towards Concord | Urban Places | Scoop.it
Sydney's economic centre of gravity has been drifting north-west and is now where you'd least expect it.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Speed Burden [Costs of Sprawl]

The Speed Burden [Costs of Sprawl] | Urban Places | Scoop.it
The need for speed devours huge chunks of American cities and leaves the edges of the expressways worthless. Busy streets, for almost all of human history, created the greatest real estate value because they delivered customers and clients to the businesses operating there. This in turn cultivated the highest tax revenues in town, both from higher property taxes and from elevated sales taxes. But you can't set up shop on the side of an expressway. How can cities afford to spend so much to create thoroughfares with no adjoining property value?

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Alex Lewis's curator insight, March 10, 10:23 AM

This article shows the difference between extremely urbanized areas and relatively urbanized areas. Florence and Atlanta are compared. Florence has narrow streets with sharp intersections, which causes cars to drive slowly. This is safer for pedestrians. In Atlanta, the roads are wider and curves are less sharp. The most this will do is help people in Atlanta get tp their jobs slightly faster. Miami and a seaside town are also compared. The interstate in Miami takes up most of the room and there is few real estate options. In the seaside town, options are not limited, around 80% available for use. The less urbanized places are more efficient. 

 

-A.L.

Alexa Earl's curator insight, March 14, 10:48 AM

This blog really made me realize what an impact humans are to the environment. They compare different cities and talk about the impacts and it really showed me how humans have built up cities.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 21, 6:12 PM

A side by side comparison at first blush is striking but the devil is in the details. Florence, Italy is a city of only 368,000 while the Atlanta metro area is about 4.5 million. Agree that sprawl is ineffective real estate and efficiency wise, but fuel prices may be having a counter effect on the reduction of sprawl. It is much less expensive to commute given the price of oil at its current levels and the millennials will have a say in this urban sprawl contracting or expanding. Many do not own cars, relying on commuter systems within the city to get around. This in theory should drive down demand for fossil fuels, culminating in reduced prices for gasoline. If the infrastructure is already built, was is the cost to maintain it, given the static population of the large metro areas? Interesting to see how this plays out.

Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Can India become a superpower?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 2, 3:16 PM

This video discusses the concept of India becoming a Superpower, which has for a long time been predicted (BRIC).  The BRIC countries are Brazil, Russia, India, and China.  China is currently the strongest out of the group, but in this piece it is discussed how India can itself become a regional power.  India's main geographic way to secure itself as a superpower is to control the Kashmir region, as Pakistan and China can share a border if India is not there.  For India this is concerning as China could influence Pakistan, a long time rival of India, to invade and give them support.  Another weakness of India is the "federation, almost a confederation" idea that surrounds the power of the states in the country.  India is supposed to be a democracy like the United States, but because of its large size and various ethnic backgrounds, it is hard to unify all the states.  However, India does have a large population and if the country continues to modernize and solves the Kashmir problem it will be in a stronger position to become a regional player.  Another thing that India will have to do is to have good relations with Bangladesh, so China can't influence attacks from either direction.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, April 6, 5:04 PM

Once referred to as the crown of British Empire, India is now resurging as a great power. The Ganges River gives some of the most fertile land in the world at its delta, and runs through India like the Mississippi. Geographically isolated on most of its borders, with mountain ranges and oceans leaves India disconnected or protected, like a castle.  In this isolation there is a lot of conflicts, without proper dams to protect this fertile land, it is always at a flood threat. All of India’s major cities are situated at the base of rivers to promote expansions. If India cannot secure water for the bordering nations it will not be able to become a superpower, and lower the gap between rich and poor.  

Paul Farias's curator insight, April 9, 11:29 AM

If you were to ask me before watching this video, i would say absolutely. They have the capability because they are full of intelligent people, they also have enough people to do it. Something is just holding them back from moving forward...

Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Global Shipping Traffic Visualized

As stated in this NPR article: "The video shows satellite tracking of routes superimposed over Google Earth. It focuses on some of the main choke points for international shipping, such as the Strait of Malacca on the southern tip of Malaysia, Suez Canal, the Strait of Gibraltar and Panama Canal. It's a good reminder that about 90 percent of all the goods traded globally spend at least some of their transit time on a ship."

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, mapping, video, visualization.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Ben Ricchio's curator insight, February 24, 10:30 AM

Very cool

Mediterranean Cruise Advice's curator insight, February 25, 6:46 AM

This is amazing to watch.

Matt Davidson's curator insight, February 26, 4:52 AM

A great visual on shipping - Geographies of Interconnections (year 9)

Scooped by L.Long
Scoop.it!

It's official: Parramatta Road will get 60,000 new apartments by 2050

It's official: Parramatta Road will get 60,000 new apartments by 2050 | Urban Places | Scoop.it
The draft plan has been release ahead of schedule and shows 10,000 more homes than previously thought.
L.Long's insight:

Sydney: Growth

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Beijing's Facelift

"A government-initiated redevelopment plan will transform one of the oldest neighborhoods in Beijing into a polished tourist attraction."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, December 16, 2014 4:01 PM

Beijing's facelift brings about the conversation of revitalization or gentrification? Urban revitalization is good fro tourism and allows more income for the country from tourists, however it also affects and displaces people at home too.  These neighborhoods are people's homes and as some of the oldest it is much meaning to those who have lived there. 

Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 26, 2:24 PM

In Beijing, China the government has plans to turn one of the oldest neighborhoods in Beijing, Gulou, to a tourist attracting. This is one of the only areas that the government did not knock down in the mass urbanization missions. Most of the residences here are poor and much of life is lived in public. Hopefully the tourist attraction will garnish money and jobs for the cities inhabitants. Large areas of the old broken down neighborhood will be turned into shops, hotels, and a museum. Inhabitants of the area to be knocked down will be moved to high rises on the outskirts of town. Some are mad and feel that the city should not be touched at all and that would be the correct way to preserve it as a historical sight.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 3, 7:39 PM

Normally I am annoyed at projects that end up destroying history, but in this instance I think the area needs to be remodeled. Part of the reason I am not fazed by the history being lost is because a fair amount of the area was already so poorly kept that many of the structures were either ruble or dilapidated. At the rate the area was going, it was already going to lose its history anyways. While it would be nice of the government to keep a small portion of the good standing landscape, I think the museum being built in the area is a nod at maintaining there history. So since you can’t have it all, I would rather side with the government trying to raise the standard of living for people who have been in continuous abject poverty since about the 13th century. As you said before, invest something in an area and you typically get something in return. Plus it seems that most of the people angered by this move are those outside of the area being remodeled (i.e. historians). I personally think those people are farther removed from the actual decision then those living there. So once again, I am happy to side with the people being most affected by the poverty stricken land. 

Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Developing World Cities and Population Density

Developing World Cities and Population Density | Urban Places | Scoop.it
Without a question, we are living in an urban era. More people now live in cities than anywhere else on the planet and I’ve repeatedly argued that cities are our most important economic engine. As a result of these shifts, we’re seeing megacities at a scale the world has never seen before.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 27, 2014 12:05 PM
المدن الأعلى كثافة بالسكان على مستوى العالم
Sally Egan's curator insight, June 29, 2014 9:31 PM

Mega cities and the challenges they face for the future is focus in this article. Great statistics on populations and urban densities are also included.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:47 PM

APHG-U6

Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Population pyramids: Powerful predictors of the future

"Population statistics are like crystal balls -- when examined closely, they can help predict a country's future (and give important clues about the past). Kim Preshoff explains how using a visual tool called a population pyramid helps policymakers and social scientists make sense of the statistics, using three different countries' pyramids as examples."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nancy Watson's curator insight, September 26, 2014 4:04 PM

Population unit

Lauren Quincy's curator insight, March 20, 1:51 PM

Unit 2: Population and Migration

 

This video was about how demographers categorize data and analyze it. This video showed a few different population pyramids in order to show differences in population in different countries. It showed China as an example and pointed out the remnants of the one child policy 35 years before and how the number of men were higher due to sex selective abortions. They also talked about how the population pyramids could show what stage in the demographic transition model a country was in and how they use them to predict future patterns and changes. 

 

This relates to unit 2 because it covers topics such as population change, demographic transition models, sex composition, population policies and much more. Population pyramids are very useful due to the visualization of sex, age and number composition in a countries population. They are very important in the use of predicting the future change in population because it can tell what the population has gone through in the past and what to expect in the DTM. 

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 10:43 PM

This video illustrates how population pyramids have the ability to show how populations will rise and fall over time. Pyramids specifically show the population based on a specific age, and illustrates a country's amount of young people in comparison to the elderly. 

Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Most And Least Sprawling Cities In America

The Most And Least Sprawling Cities In America | Urban Places | Scoop.it

"Tracking changes in the shape of American cities over 10 years reveals which cities pack the most into a small space, but don't worry, sprawlers: Los Angeles shows you can change your fate."


Today’s nearly 314 million U.S. residents will expand to 401 million in less than 40 years. Wherever you fall on the cultural spectrum between country and city mouse, the fact remains that we simply won’t be able to use up resources the way we do now in sprawling suburbs shaped by car culture.  See also this infographic depicting those with the worst sprawl. and CNN Money's list of the worst sprawl and a discussion of it's impacts.  

 

Tags: density, sustainability, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities. 


Via Seth Dixon
L.Long's insight:

Urban  Dynamics

more...
Geofreak's curator insight, April 3, 2014 1:35 PM

Ruimtelijk ordening, stedelijke gebieden

VS

Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Can You Identify These Cities From Their Light Signatures?

Can You Identify These Cities From Their Light Signatures? | Urban Places | Scoop.it

"The light that a city emits is like its glowing fingerprint. From the orderly grid of Manhattan, to the sprawling, snaking streets of Milan, to the bright contrast of Kuwait’s ring-roads, each city leaves its own pattern of tiny glowing dots. See if you can ID these cities based on the way they shine."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 12, 2014 9:59 PM

This short quiz of 16 cities combines several analytic components of geography that you won't see in more standard map quizzes for regional geography;  this draws on some similar skills similar to the map quiz that was based on identifying the city based on Starbucks locations.  Some recognition of local spatial patterns from previous map analysis can make this quiz easier but there are still some cities that you haven't ever looked at from space before.  Things to consider as you attempt this quiz:  Which of the four possible selections can you rule out out?  What enabled you to eliminate those selections (e.g.-coastal, scale, size, grid pattern, transportation systems, density, etc.)?  What does to layout of the city tell us about the planning and historical origins of the city?  Is there one urban model that best helps us explain the configuration of this city?     


Tags: urbanmodels, planning, density, urbanism, unit 7 citiestrivia.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, April 14, 2014 11:00 AM

Geography education

Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Science behind Google Earth

The Science behind Google Earth | Urban Places | Scoop.it

"Google is using a new technology to automatically generate  3D buildings from 45-degree angle aerial photography made by overlapping passes of aircraft.  The aerial photos are combined to create 3D models."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Annenkov's curator insight, April 16, 2014 12:46 AM

This technology of visualization I would name "3D landscape"

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, April 16, 2014 8:40 PM

Tecnología para generar imágenes en 3D con Google Earth

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 2:06 PM

Google Earth has made the Earth easier to decipher and examine in a geographical sense of location and place by being able to see multiple layers. This article goes into the 3D designs and usage of aerial photography to create 3D images.

Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Facebook connections map the world

Facebook connections map the world | Urban Places | Scoop.it
Facebook intern Paul Butler has created a detailed map of the world by mapping connections between people using the social network living in different cities.

Via Seth Dixon
L.Long's insight:

Global networks

 

more...
Louis Culotta's curator insight, April 27, 2013 11:39 AM

This is very cool...just like the internet map you posted. I have a seperate facebook page just to communicate back and forth to my friend nd his family in New Zealand in real time for free.

Thomas C. Thompson's curator insight, April 27, 2013 8:25 PM

This is a picture of our world and the real way that we are connected in real time from Facebook. It's amazing! Share this everywhere!

Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:23 PM

This map amazes me because of just how big Facebook has become after starting as a small site for college kids in the U.S. to connect on.  Now it is one of the largest contributing factors to globalization as it allows people from various continents to connect to others with a simple Internet connection.  It has helped people of different cultures come together and as we saw in class, it helps spread word of different political happenings that regular news media tries to hide from us.  

It's also really interesting to see how China is completely off the grid and so is central and Saharan Africa because in terms of modern day globalization, they are not areas that participate in many global affairs and with the prominence Facebook holds in today's world, the parts of the world that are missing are much stranger to us in cultural terms.

Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Maeklong Railway Market

"Multi-purpose land use."


Via Seth Dixon
L.Long's insight:

Megacities

more...
Sushmita Vargo's curator insight, April 8, 7:49 AM

industry and industriousness of people and places

 

Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 14, 11:42 AM

While watching this video I was very shocked and surprised, just because I know that if I was to visit and there was a train coming by at a veggie market I would not remain calm, cool and collected like the people shown in the video. Everyone has different customs in their lives and everyone makes use of their land differently, yes it is very unsanitary to have train tracks near food but that is definitely clever and a great source of space to do such a thing. The people in this video are aware of the train passing by and just pulls back their roofs back. The train tracks seem to be raised and the food underneath is not crushed, if it did get crushed people would be out of business and lose valuable money.

This system does not work in the United States because we are not using to trains passing by so casually, while in Thailand the people are accustomed to that life and go through the same procedure everyday. Traditions and customs are a part of daily life in all different places around the world, everyone lives differently and creates a specific life for themselves.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 15, 10:05 PM

In America you will hear safety first and health second. But for most veggie market sellers, health and safety do not matter. Every tiny bit of space, especially in Asian countries, are not wasted and organized. These people are used to dealing with this problem on a daily basis and they learn in the face of danger. Most of the time people live near train stations, which serves as a good location to sell products. One thing that I noticed is that no one is concerned when the trains approach the veggie market. Those veggie could get contaminated when the train goes through for example leaving metal bits from the brake system, hydraulic fluid.... etc. However, in the U.S. people argue about how the vegetables are treated with pesticides. This can lead to potential life hazards. Poor local communities need to adapt to survive in whatever space they can manage and take advantage of the available resources even when the environment makes it a challenge. 

Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How does the United Nations work?

"Ever curious about the reaches of the United Nation and what they do? Here's a great video featuring Dr. Binoy Kampmark from RMIT University.  This short video can help improve your understanding of the UN, including its role in world politics and policy making."


Via Seth Dixon
L.Long's insight:

Economic authority 

more...
zane alan berger's curator insight, March 25, 5:32 PM

this video explains- as it says in it's headline- how the UN works. It essentially covers the different operations the UN takes part in to maintain world peace; ranging from security to human rights to disease and so on. It also talks about the security council which consists of France, the UK, US, China, and Russia, along with the general assembly.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 25, 9:11 PM

The United Nations (UN) constantly works on maintaining international peace, economic issues, and cultural and human rights around the world. The UN has a tremendous impact around the world, with 193 nations participating in frequent meeting about how to resolve global and domestic issues and making policies for the world. The UN plays an important role in &maintain[ing] international peace and security; to develop friendly relations among nations; to operate in solving international problems and in promoting respect for human rights; and finally to be a center for harmonizing the actions of nations&(WWW.UN.org). The UN has a lot of responsibilities as it tries to keep the whole world at peace.

Carlee Allen's curator insight, March 26, 7:03 PM

This is a very short and simplified video that explains all about what the UN is and what they do. The UN plays a major role in helping developing countries and taking part with them if they are in need of help or in a crisis. This video also explains what the security council is and what they do.

 

I already knew most of the things mentioned in the video, but I always think that UN things are interesting and I'm always willing to learn more about what they do and how they are helping the world.

 

 

Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

City Centers Are Doing Better than Inner Suburbs

City Centers Are Doing Better than Inner Suburbs | Urban Places | Scoop.it

A new report tracks demographic trends across 66 U.S. metro areas.  The report provides comprehensive evidence for Aaron Renn's "new donut" model of cities (pictured in above image, on the right). Renn's model proposes that city centers and outer-ring suburbs are doing well economically, but inner-ring suburbs are struggling with a new influx of poverty."

 

Tags: urban, economic, urban models, APHG.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 14, 9:12 AM

unit 7

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, March 24, 10:00 AM

Although this is a unit 7 concept, this idea can also be applied to our unit 5 agriculture studies. Set up like the von Thunen model, city centers are starting to lose economic gains and opportunities, while the city suburbs suck them all up. This change in economic shifts can extremely effect the way that the central business district of a political region is set up. 

Paul Farias's curator insight, April 9, 12:47 PM

This should've made sense years ago, i think that the inner city should have the best of everything and should be doing the best because it is the representation of the state, and even for me cousins from out of the country always want to see the inner city. 

Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Global Shipping Traffic Visualized

As stated in this NPR article: "The video shows satellite tracking of routes superimposed over Google Earth. It focuses on some of the main choke points for international shipping, such as the Strait of Malacca on the southern tip of Malaysia, Suez Canal, the Strait of Gibraltar and Panama Canal. It's a good reminder that about 90 percent of all the goods traded globally spend at least some of their transit time on a ship."

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, mapping, video, visualization.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Ben Ricchio's curator insight, February 24, 10:30 AM

Very cool

Mediterranean Cruise Advice's curator insight, February 25, 6:46 AM

This is amazing to watch.

Matt Davidson's curator insight, February 26, 4:52 AM

A great visual on shipping - Geographies of Interconnections (year 9)

Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Cityscapes of Rio de Janeiro


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

This Is the Traffic Capital of the World

This Is the Traffic Capital of the World | Urban Places | Scoop.it
There are only 650 major intersections here—but somehow only 60 traffic lights.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:01 PM

Traffic is one of the major problems facing expanding cities, and Dhaka stands as an example of one of the 18 megacities found in low-income countries. Populations will continue to rise, and in places with lax police forces, laws, and infrastructure so will the traffic problems. The many concerned legal institutions involved also make any possible political reform a difficult goal to accomplish. 

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:22 PM

Poor infrastructure and overpopulation is the primary reason for serious traffic congestion in Dhaka. Walking is always suitable as well as the use of smaller vehicles like motorcycles, that can weave in and out of traffic. The government needs to enforce a strategy to alleviate traffic congestion. An efficent public transportation system would be a good start. 

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 22, 6:46 PM

The fact that traffic accounts for $3.8 billion in costs is a simply a staggering figure.  I can't stand being in traffic for 5 minutes never mind multiple hours every day just to get a mile or two down the street.  With population so high in these megacities, its astonishing to see that the governments of these cities are not focusing more on the infrastructure to stabilize the traffic.  Im sure this in turn effects the economy and the lives of all individuals involved.

Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Language of Maps Kids Should Know

The Language of Maps Kids Should Know | Urban Places | Scoop.it
The vocabulary and concepts of maps kids should learn to enhance their map-skills & geography awareness. Concise definitions with clear illustrations.

 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Anita Vance's curator insight, June 30, 2014 8:54 AM

This article helps give an early start to map skill implementation - even at the earliest levels.

DTLLS tutor's curator insight, July 1, 2014 5:04 AM

Love this website. Not just this article, but the whole idea. Have a little browse around...

wereldvak's curator insight, July 6, 2014 2:53 PM

De taal van de kaart: welke  woordenschat hebben kinderen nodig om de kaart te kunnen lezen?

Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Aerial housing photographs show stark division between rich and poor in Mexico

Aerial housing photographs show stark division between rich and poor in Mexico | Urban Places | Scoop.it
A new advertising campaign is seeking to draw attention to the gap between the wealthy and the poverty-stricken in Mexico by showing how they co-exist in disturbingly close proximity.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Ms. Harrington's curator insight, June 17, 2014 8:35 AM

And again in Brazil

http://civitasinclusive.wordpress.com/2013/03/16/paraisopolis-brazil-by-tuca-vieira-2004/

Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 3, 2014 1:21 PM

The pictures show the deep divide between rich and poor in Mexico. These settlements are built to the point where luxurious condos share a wall with decaying slum housing. The roads do not connect the areas, showing how these places were constructed separately by to distinctly different communities. While the proximity between sections shows that sights, sounds, and smells most likely carry across the two sections, the rich area looks as if it has no idea what lies directly beyond their walls. The fact that the rich areas are literally walled off from the rest of the surrounding area says a lot about the deep economic divides found around the world today.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 9:02 AM

Right away from looking at this picture, you can tell which side is which. I didn't even have to read the article yet to find out where the wealthier people lived and where the not so wealthy lived. The colors stood out the most to me. In the picture on the left, it is clear that this is the not so wealthy part in Mexico. The color is just filled with dark and gloominess, mostly shown in gray. The houses are also pushed very closely together. On the right side, it appears that this is the richer side of Mexico. Although the houses are closer together like the picture on the left, they are colorful. They have firm built roofs and appear to be built and taken care of much better. Something else that gives you the sense of which community is more rich is the cars. There is a whole line of cars in the right picture while in the left picture we see a few here and there. The right picture also illustrates lawns. We slightly see some grass in the left, but it is clearly not as well taken care of as the lawns in the right picture. This picture was done as an advertisement to draw attention to the gap between the two different communities. The campaign goes by the name "Erase the Differences" and hopes to get people to realize the differences in poverty that are right in front of them.

Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Primate Cities: Mexico City

http://geographyeducation.org/2014/05/05/primate-cities-mexico-city/


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 22, 2014 12:24 PM

The concept of a primate city has both benefits and drawbacks for the country in which it is located. The large population of the primate city draws new technology and foreign investment into the country. Unfortunately, the large population of the primate city also leads to population and brain drain from the surrounding regions which can damage the overall economic and intellectual status of the country. 

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:45 PM

Primate Cities are furthered studied using Mexico as an example.

Primate cities affect movement by having a greater pull on migrants.

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, October 6, 2014 2:49 PM

The spatial population of Mexico City is densely packed. The south-west side of the city or the Western Sector zone features upscale, wealthy neighborhoods. The north and eastern sectors of the city are densely populated and are the poorer sectors of the city. It is interesting looking at the city from a top-down aerial view. One can see that the wealthier western sector’s spatial geography is spread out more so than the poorer sectors and features more vegetation, possibly due to an environmentally friendly irrigation system. 

Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

New York City's Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts

New York City's Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts | Urban Places | Scoop.it
Two photographers set out to see what happened to small family businesses in New York City in a decade

Via Seth Dixon
L.Long's insight:

Changing nature of world cities

more...
Heidi Ames's curator insight, April 10, 2014 10:49 AM

Awesome to use when studying the Northeast and Immigration.  How scenes change in a short time due to economy!

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, April 12, 2014 7:28 AM

What a decade can do to a cultural landscape.

Jake Reardon's curator insight, April 21, 2014 5:49 PM

To be honest I am surprised that "Mom and Pop" storefronts lasted this long in New York City. It just seems to me that as a city grows and rent prices go up the smaller store fronts would naturally be pushed out by larger conglomerates who would be more suited to handle the rent prices. Of course it is an old addeage of capitalism that as long as you offer a good product that consumers would be inclined to consume you can stay above water in even the most competitive locations. Although to me that would appear to have its limits. Perhaps the economic tides of the present in New York are that limit.

Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Globalization and the Textile Industry

"On the 100th anniversary of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire, little has changed in the global sweatshop economy. Workers are again trapped and burned to death behind locked exit gates."


Via Seth Dixon
L.Long's insight:

A good example of dominance and dependence

more...
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 24, 2014 11:28 AM

unit 6

Danielle Bellefeuille's curator insight, May 10, 2014 6:16 PM

The sad reality of the new division of labor, we are moving backwards instead of forwards with labor policies and widening the gap between core and periphery countries. We need to stand up and advocate for fair trade. These countries rely on us for sources of unemployment, and we need to give them better wages, safer working conditions, and help them push pass this dependency, and grow into more economically and socially strong countries.

 

http://www.laborrights.org

Michael Mazo's curator insight, December 10, 2014 8:03 PM

The triangle shirtwaist factory in New York was a revolutionary turning point in labor regulations. Following this unfortunate event there had been many rules and laws that took effect in order to help the working people in factories and other harmful work places. The textile industry had been such an impact on globalization because this product had been so greatly treasured that countries all around the world were getting their fair share of producing a good that was in such high demand and through the use of globalization transport created an higher demand for textiles. Although, the boom of the textile industry came with the sacrifice of innocent civilians who worked endlessly just to feed their family. Regulations and legislation have to be put into effect to protect our people and our economy. 

Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Ship-Shipping Ships

Ship-Shipping Ships | Urban Places | Scoop.it

"This is a ship-shipping ship, shipping shipping ships."  http://geographyeducation.org/2013/10/14/ship-shipping-ships/

 


Via Seth Dixon
L.Long's insight:

The two industries that are the real backbone of globalization are transportation and communication.  What has accelerated the pace of global interconnectedness is the scale of these devices and their ubiquity in facilitating massive global commerce.

more...
Jamie Strickland's curator insight, October 15, 2013 1:35 PM

First, this is a fantastic photo...a freighter shipping other freighters.  As my colleague Seth Dixon points out, this is a fantastic image of one of the important drivers of the acceleration of globalization in recent history.  

jim dzialo's curator insight, October 16, 2013 2:54 PM

Pretty sure that doesn't fit in the panama canal

 

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:33 PM

#shippingships