Geography @ Stretford
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Geography @ Stretford
Extended reading from the Geography Department at Stretford High School, Manchester, UK. Aimed primarily at our students but also a space for wider geographical debate about our ever changing planet.
Curated by Adam Cooke
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The Early Earth and Plate Tectonics - YouTube

The Earth is formed by accretion of spatial particulates and large masses and eventually forms an outer crust. Video follows with speculation of early plates...
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An insightful video into tectonic plates.

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New Oxfam report says half of global wealth held by the 1%

New Oxfam report says half of global wealth held by the 1% | Geography @ Stretford | Scoop.it
Oxfam warns of widening inequality gap, days ahead of Davos economic summit in Switzerland
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Gates foundation annual letter: what do you think of their vision?

Gates foundation annual letter: what do you think of their vision? | Geography @ Stretford | Scoop.it
Carla Kweifio-Okai: Do you think the goals outlined by Bill and Melinda Gates are achievable? Share your thoughts
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Reese Witherspoon in 'Wild': An all too rare story of a woman on a solo adventure

Reese Witherspoon in 'Wild': An all too rare story of a woman on a solo adventure | Geography @ Stretford | Scoop.it
There is a scene in the film Wild in which Cheryl Strayed (played by Reese Witherspoon) runs out of food in the middle of nowhere and is forced to hitch a ride into town with a farm worker, an overweight middle-aged guy in a pick-up truck. Is he creepy? Is something awful about to happen to her? We’re not sure, but he makes a few possibly untoward comments and, as Witherspoon edges into the passenger seat, she blusters nervously about her “husband”, who has gone ahead and is waiting for her, “ju
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50 years of gentrification: will all our cities turn into 'deathly' Canberra?

50 years of gentrification: will all our cities turn into 'deathly' Canberra? | Geography @ Stretford | Scoop.it
The drive to make cities more ‘liveable’ means parks, plazas and happy pedestrians. But the reality is ever more sterile, identikit cities where public space isn’t public at all
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World's beaches being washed away due to coastal development

World's beaches being washed away due to coastal development | Geography @ Stretford | Scoop.it
From Florida to the Costa del Sol, costly sea defences are accelerating beach erosion and will ultimately fail to protect coastal towns and cities from rising tides, say experts
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India's massive migration crisis

India's massive migration crisis | Geography @ Stretford | Scoop.it
Allianz Knowledge on Demography: Is the Oscar-winning movie Slumdog Millionaire just a Hollywood fantasy? K. Laxmi Narayan, an expert in Indian urbanization at the University of Hyderabad, doesn’t think so. He reports that half of Mumbai residents live in slums and warns that both Indian cities and the countryside are chronically overcrowded.
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Urban Age Cities Compared | Articles | LSE Cities

Urban Age Cities Compared | Articles | LSE Cities | Geography @ Stretford | Scoop.it
LSE Cities is an international centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science that studies how people and cities interact in a rapidly urbanising world, focussing on how the design of cities impacts on society, culture and the environment. Through research, conferences, teaching and projects, the centre aims to shape new thinking and practice on how to make cities fairer and more sustainable for the next generation of urban dwellers, who will make up some 70 per cent of the global population by 2050.
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A wealth of statistics to support settlement case studies.

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Green Climate Fund will get $200m from Australia after Tony Abbott's about-turn

Green Climate Fund will get $200m from Australia after Tony Abbott's about-turn | Geography @ Stretford | Scoop.it
Prime minister had previously disparaged the international fund designed to help poor countries adapt to climate change, and said Australia would not contribute
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Hans Rosling: Debunking third-world myths with the best stats you've ever seen - YouTube

Hans Rosling shows how measurement reveals incredible progress in saving the lives of children in what were once labeled "developing countries." If the few c...
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Worldwide Country Comparison

Worldwide Country Comparison | Geography @ Stretford | Scoop.it

"MyLifeElsewhere allows you to compare your home country with different countries around the world. Ever wonder what your life would be like if you were born somewhere else?"


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HG Académie de Rennes's curator insight, January 31, 2015 1:56 AM

Un site d'une grande simplicité d'utilisation bien qu'en anglais. Le principe est de choisir deux pays dans un menu déroulant pour en comparer les principaux indicateurs de développement sous la forme de petites infographies très pédagogiques.
La comparaison est évidemment un processus de raisonnement à mettre en place pour situer et caractériser en géographie. On songera ainsi à l'utilisation d'un tel outil dans le cadre de l'étude des inégalités de développement en classe de 5e et de Seconde, mais aussi pour une mise en perspective sur les Territoires dans la mondialisation en classe de 4e afin de caractériser un PMA, un pays émergent, un pays développé (cf. exemple réalisé pour l'illustration).

Dernière information sur ce site, les statistiques utilisées proviennent des bases de données open source de la CIA américaine.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, February 7, 2015 7:51 PM

After studying this comparison tool and using it to find the best of the best and worst of the worst, I picked out some highlights I'd like to share. Monaco is clearly the place to be born, earn, and live. When compared to the USA, the infant mortality rate is 71% less, the life expectancy is 10 years longer @ 84, and you'll earn 62% more money, no doubt because you have ten more years in which to do so. I believe the stats may be skewed a bit in this country comparison as the very rich live there and they have access to the best medical care, and probably don't have very many infants with them when they make the move from elsewhere, hence the low infant mortality rate. Austria is not a bad second choice as you are 33% less likely to be unemployed. On a sobering note, the life expectancy if you live in Namibia is only 52! Yikes, I'm already 53... It's far worse however in Swaziland. The life expectancy is sadly only 50.5 years and you are 44 times more likely to have AIDS than if you lived here. 26.5% of the population has AIDS! Be thankful for where you live and stop complaining, it's far worse on average in nearly all other countries.

Monika Fleischmann's curator insight, February 15, 2015 4:59 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

Did you know that with 1/30th the territory of the United States, Norway still has over 25% more coastline?  I didn't either until I compared Norway to the United States using My Life Elsewhere.  This site is designed allow United States students to imagine how their lives might be different if they were born in a different part of the world.  Students would probably die 21 years earlier if they were born in Liberia and 11 times more likely to have died in infancy.   Students would be 43.8% less likely to grow up and be unemployed and have 36.3% less babies if they were born in Taiwan.  This side-by-side format is a great way to help students help make these statistics real and meaningful.  One major drawback: this site only allows users to compare a country to the United States.  If you prefer to have students compare, say Cuba to the United Arab Emirates, I would recommend that you try If It Where My Home. 


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Risk of supervolcano eruption big enough to 'affect the world' far greater than thought, scientists say

Risk of supervolcano eruption big enough to 'affect the world' far greater than thought, scientists say | Geography @ Stretford | Scoop.it
The eruption of a “supervolcano” hundreds of times more powerful than conventional volcanoes – with the potential to wipe out civilisation as we know it – is more likely than previously thought, a study has found.
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'Conflict free' minerals from the DRC will only be possible if companies stay

'Conflict free' minerals from the DRC will only be possible if companies stay | Geography @ Stretford | Scoop.it
New legislation for the disclosure of conflict minerals in companies' supply chains is prompting many to leave the troubled DRC, but change will only happen if they stay
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Sustainable development goals: changing the world in 17 steps – interactive

Sustainable development goals: changing the world in 17 steps – interactive | Geography @ Stretford | Scoop.it
The MDGs expire this year and the SDGs begin. But what are the SDGs all about?
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Human Development Index (HDI)

Human Development Index (HDI) | Geography @ Stretford | Scoop.it

"This map shows Human Development Index (HDI) for 169 countries in the World. The HDI is a comparative measure of life expectancy, literacy, education, and standard of living for countries worldwide. The HDI sets a minimum and a maximum for each dimension, called goalposts, and then shows where each country stands in relation to these goalposts, expressed as a value between 0 and 1, where greater is better. The Human Development Index (HDI) measures the average achievements in a country in three basic dimensions of human development: health, knowledge and standard of living."

 

Tags: development, statistics, worldwide.


Via Seth Dixon
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Caroline Ivy's curator insight, May 18, 2015 10:41 AM

This article discusses the Human Development Index (HDI), what it is, and how it is calculated. 

 

This chart displays that the top three spots on the HDI are occupied by Norway, Australia, and the Netherlands respectively, with the USA coming in fourth. As HDI is calculated by comparing aspects like literacy, standard of living, education, and life expectancy, why are two European countries and Australia in the top 3? Something to be looked at is the in-migration of each country. Immigrants arrival in large numbers in some countries can lower HDI if they are refugees or come from a country with a lower HDI, for they may be illiterate, have a low education, and therefore a low life expectancy. With in migration to the US tightly controlled but in constant motion, their HDI could be pulled down to 4th. As Norway and Australia and the Netherlands are not the main destination for refugees, their HDI could be higher.   

Cody Price's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:49 AM

The HDI is the human development index which ranks countries in many different aspects. The higher the country the more developed and modern it is. The least amount of death and the longest lives are here. It is more stable the higher the country.

 

This relates to the topic in unit 6 of HDI. this map shows the basic HDIS of the world and the patterns formed by the HDI layout of the world. 

Anna Sasaki's curator insight, May 27, 2015 2:04 AM

This map shows the Human Development Index around the world. The HDI depends on a set list of variables, ranking them from 1st to last. Nations considered to be "Western" are more developed than nations in regions such as Africa and Asia, although all nations are slowly but steadily developing, improving their Human Development Index ranking.

The HDI shows development in nations, although leaving out Inequality factors. This map also allows us to see spatially what regions tend to be more developed as well as developing.

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Santa's real workshop: the town in China that makes the world's Christmas decorations

Santa's real workshop: the town in China that makes the world's Christmas decorations | Geography @ Stretford | Scoop.it
Inside the ‘Christmas village’ of Yiwu, there’s no snow and no elves, just 600 factories that produce 60% of all the decorations in the world
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Mumbai’s Moment

Mumbai’s Moment | Geography @ Stretford | Scoop.it
A booming economy is pushing an Indian megalopolis — with its new class of super-rich and its crushing poverty — into the limelight.
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Green agriculture: A food revolution

Green agriculture: A food revolution | Geography @ Stretford | Scoop.it
Allianz Knowledge on Environment: Agriculture’s Green Revolution rescued millions from starvation in the 20th century but failed to eradicate hunger. With global food demand set to grow by 50 percent by 2030, the new century needs a new agricultural revolution.
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Hans Rosling: The River of Myths - YouTube

Hans Rosling shows how measurement reveals incredible progress in saving the lives of children in what were once labeled "developing countries." If the few c...
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