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Rise of Residential Segregation by Income

Rise of Residential Segregation by Income | Geography Resources | Scoop.it

"Residential segregation by income has increased during the past three decades across the United States and in 27 of the nation’s 30 largest major metropolitan area, according to a new analysis of census tract and household income data by the Pew Research Center.  The analysis finds that 28% of lower-income households in 2010 were located in a majority lower-income census tract, up from 23% in 1980, and that 18% of upper- income households were located in a majority upper-income census tract, up from 9% in 1980."  This interactive map allows the user to explore the 10 largest metropolitan areas in the U.S. To read the article associated with this map, see: http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2012/08/01/the-rise-of-residential-segregation-by-income/


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Middle-Class Areas Shrink as Income Gap Grows, New Report Finds

Middle-Class Areas Shrink as Income Gap Grows, New Report Finds | Geography Resources | Scoop.it
Over the past four decades, rising income inequality has left larger patches of affluence and poverty. (Middle Class Shrinks as Income Gap Grows.
 
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Clair Koh's curator insight, January 26, 9:17 AM

What i know is that poverty is poor whereas affluence is wealthy. What makes me wonder about this is why is the world so unfair. And why is it so that the poor people have such horrible lives. They go through the same hunger everyday. The people who are wealthy should help out a little as they have plently of cash to spare. And also this leads me to another question. Why isn't the governement or some fiancial assistance help helping them instead of letting them suffer.

Rescooped by Emily Fekete from Inequality in U.S.
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Rise of Residential Segregation by Income

Rise of Residential Segregation by Income | Geography Resources | Scoop.it

"Residential segregation by income has increased during the past three decades across the United States and in 27 of the nation’s 30 largest major metropolitan area, according to a new analysis of census tract and household income data by the Pew Research Center.  The analysis finds that 28% of lower-income households in 2010 were located in a majority lower-income census tract, up from 23% in 1980, and that 18% of upper- income households were located in a majority upper-income census tract, up from 9% in 1980."  This interactive map allows the user to explore the 10 largest metropolitan areas in the U.S. To read the article associated with this map, see: http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2012/08/01/the-rise-of-residential-segregation-by-income/


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Growing Income Gap Segregates More Neighborhoods

Growing Income Gap Segregates More Neighborhoods | Geography Resources | Scoop.it

"A new report by the Pew Research Center shows that rising income inequality has led to an increasing number of Americans clustering in neighborhoods in which most residents are like them, either similarly affluent or similarly low income." 

 

DB: Economic deprivation both within and between nations are increasing as the world becomes further globalized.  American is no exception to this as the current recession continues to impact not just how people live their lives but where as well. As the middle class continues to shrink, the location of you residence is becoming a stronger indicator of your socioeconomic standing in society. The issue is not only that both opposite ends of the nation’s wealth spectrum are expanding but also that they our clustering together creating entire communities segregated by income. What role does gentrification play in this? How does income affect who is moving in and who is being displaced? What effects will this have for American society concerning which communities voice is heard?


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Why Do Americans Accept Wealth Inequality?

Why Do Americans Accept Wealth Inequality? | Geography Resources | Scoop.it
The belief in individual choice affects beliefs about wealth inequality...

It is clear that many Americans who are not in wealthiest 20% support policies that maintain the inequality in the distribution of wealth. Over the past fifteen years, tax rates have been cut across the board and attempts to increase tax rates on the wealthiest 1 to 2% of Americans have been blocked. The politicians who have blocked these tax increases have been re-elected. Clearly, many people are voting for these candidates, suggesting that there is broad support for the current inequality in wealth.

Why is that?


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Gentrification: Views From Both Sides of the Street

Gentrification: Views From Both Sides of the Street | Geography Resources | Scoop.it
Despite the fact that Detroiters will get the benefits of newfound energy, enthusiasm, and even money, it's unrealistic to expect a group who is scared of the unknown and having power stripped away to welcome outsiders with open arms.

 

 BM: Detroit has been down in a slump for a while and with gentrification(adding people of wealthier income) into the the Midtown neighborhood of Detroit. Despite the wealth of income in Midtown the rest of the City still has an average income of around $28,000 which is pretty weak compared to Midtown's average income of $111,000. One could argue that this gentrification project is not going at the pace desired. Slow and steady...


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BBC: Urbanization

BBC: Urbanization | Geography Resources | Scoop.it

A fantastic interactive map with population charts that show the massive explosion in urbanization since 1950 until the present.


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Seth Dixon's comment, November 4, 2011 11:22 AM
Thanks to my mentor teacher (when I was a student teaching myself in Utah with 9th graders) for finding this link. He's STILL helping me out all these years later...here's to all you mentoring the next generation of educators!