Geography Resources for Secondary Students
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Geography Resources for Secondary Students
useful sites to assist teaching Geography to secondary students
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How to Create an Interactive Map with Visme

How to Create an Interactive Map with Visme | Geography Resources for Secondary Students | Scoop.it
A step-by-step tutorial on how to create an interactive map with Visme, a free online infographic and presentation tool.

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Tom Cockburn's curator insight, December 13, 2016 3:55 AM
Create your own maps
António Leça Domingues's curator insight, December 19, 2016 6:44 AM
Criar um mapa interativo com Visme.
Bart van Maanen's curator insight, December 19, 2016 10:02 AM
Mooie tool om een kaart van data te voorzien.
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The Ganges River Is Dying Under the Weight of Modern India

The Ganges River Is Dying Under the Weight of Modern India | Geography Resources for Secondary Students | Scoop.it
The country’s future depends on keeping the holy river alive.

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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 7:00 PM

The Ganges River is a place of religion for these people, they see it as a place where they can bathe for the forgiveness of sins and for ancestors alike. The only problem with this really is that it is a very dirty river, sewage and other sorts of waste, germs and disease are running through it. Unfortunately, the people are drinking from this river.  

Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:21 AM

The Ganges River is the most populated region in all of India. The river is sacred and is very holy to the people of India. The river is a religious river in which the people residing in the area use it as a symbolization or purification, life, bathing and drinking. The bigger issue for 'purification' is the fact that the river is very polluted and unsanitary. The pollution not only threatens the people because it could be used for drinking but it also affects the thousands of species, for example fish, that are in the river. The fish could be a source of food for the very overpopulated area but instead the very own people of India are damaging the river. One would think that a river so sacred would be protected and cleaned but it fails to meet these standards. Overall, regardless of the pollution, India still uses it for its religious beliefs and still declare it a holy river. 

Sarah Holloway's curator insight, February 16, 2016 6:26 PM

This article touches on very serious religious and environmental issues connected to the Ganges River.  The Ganges is the sacred river of Hinduism and in part because the river valley is the most heavily populated region of India.  Simultaneously, this holy river is an incredibly polluted river as it's the watershed for a industrial region that struggles with significant sanitation problems; this is a great article on the environmental and cultural issues of development.

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Singapore's Pro-Natalist Policies

"Today, it’s no longer unusual to see married couples not wanting to have any children or delaying parenthood. Regardless of big or small changes between the past and present, one thing remains constant –  the joy & bliss that are seen in the parents’ eyes. Parenthood is not without its challenges, but you can't put a price on seeing the smile on your little ones' faces."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 2, 2015 8:54 AM

This video is part of the "Maybe Baby?" campaign in Singapore designed to boost the low fertility rate in this small Southeast Asian country.  Singapore's National Night was another innovative campaign to boost fertility rates (although much more provocative than this one).

There are several countries these days that are adopting pro-natalist policies (including Denmark and their favorite travel agency); they officially encourage citizens to have more children to boost fertility rates that are below the replacement level, fearful that it will have negative social and economic impacts for their population.

 

Tag: declining populations, Singaporepopulation, demographics, unit 2 population, .

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Spatial technologies for educators

Spatial technologies for educators | Geography Resources for Secondary Students | Scoop.it
Use spatial resources and technology in the classroom.

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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, September 25, 2015 12:04 AM

GTAV Technology and cartography in Geography

Find out what spatial technologies are and how they can be used by students in the classroom. From the GTAQ

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Geography Right Here. Right Now. - YouTube

Amazing facts for a Geography of the 21st Century. See www.geography.org.uk See www.pupilvision.com
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great video for what Geogrpahy means today and why it matters.

Useful for Year 9 and above

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What can you do with geography? - YouTube

We all know that geography is important; but what can you do with it? As students across the country prepare for the 2012 National Geographic Bee, we've expl...
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good resource for Years9 & 10 about how geography is used in different fields and careers

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The difference between weather & the climate in 3 minutes.

The difference between weather & the climate in 3 minutes. | Geography Resources for Secondary Students | Scoop.it
The difference between weather & climate can be confusing, but this is a great simple explanation.

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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, April 3, 2015 2:29 AM

GTAV AC:G Y7 - Water in the world

CD - The causes, impacts and responses to an atmospheric or hydrological hazard.

 

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Take A Mouth-Watering Tour Of School Lunches From Around The World

Take A Mouth-Watering Tour Of School Lunches From Around The World | Geography Resources for Secondary Students | Scoop.it
Eating at the school cafeteria could've been amazing if you grew up almost anywhere but the U.S.

 

Tags: agriculture, food distribution. 


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Emily Bian's curator insight, March 25, 2015 5:53 PM

This is a really cool article! I always enjoy looking at food from around the world, so I automatically scooped this when I saw it. This is a article with a slideshow of school lunches around the world. At the very end of the photo slide, there is a photo of an American school lunch which is pretty embarrassing compared to Brazil and Finland. This photo series was taken by SweetGreens, and the school lunches were put together to represent an average school lunch, not necessarily what they have every day. 

They talk about how each country eats what is grown around them, while US is processed food like chicken nuggets and chocolate chip cookie.

I really want to move to Brazil and eat their school lunch, haha! It looks so good. For dessert in Finland, they have a berry crepe on their plate! That's awesome! If you have some free time, then be sure to check this out! 

5) Interdependence among regions of food production and consumption

Raychel Johnson's curator insight, May 25, 2015 6:46 PM

Summary: This article showed a series of pictures, which showed traditional school lunches of different countries. Greece's lunch included a Mediterranean diet, while Brazil's had rice and beans with greens, and the United States had its classic chicken nuggets, chocolate chip cookie, and mashed potatoes. The goal of this article was definitely to show what foods were incorporated into different cultures and climates.

 

Insight: Food is one example of a cultural trait, and quite a prominent one. Tradition may prohibit or encourage eating a certain kind of food, while long term climate also makes a large difference on the crops traditional grown in a country. 

Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, February 10, 2016 9:16 AM

This is an excellent way to compare the impact that agriculture and culture in general have on our schools! 

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The Global State of Agriculture infographic

The Global State of Agriculture infographic | Geography Resources for Secondary Students | Scoop.it
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Into the desert

Into the desert | Geography Resources for Secondary Students | Scoop.it
Deep in Australia's outback, the harsh, dry conditions belie the beauty and life found among the shifting red sand dunes, vast gibber plains and rocky ranges. Discover the desert in this stunning collection of photos from across Australia.
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Here's what Pangea looks like mapped with modern political borders

Here's what Pangea looks like mapped with modern political borders | Geography Resources for Secondary Students | Scoop.it
Pretty wild, right? It's a map of Pangea -- a supercontinent that formed roughly 300 million years ago -- mapped with contemporary geopolitical borders.

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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, October 15, 2013 5:59 AM

CD - The geomorphic processes that produce landforms, including a case study of at least one landform.

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Space archaeologist unlocks secrets of ancient civilizations

Space archaeologist unlocks secrets of ancient civilizations | Geography Resources for Secondary Students | Scoop.it
Dr Sarah Parcak uses satellite technology to unearth Egypt's ancient settlements, pyramids and palaces lost in the sands of time.

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 4, 2014 12:10 AM

It is interesting to find out that in this specific article there is controversy over the looting of tombs over 5,000 years ago as soon as the deceased were buried there were many more looting acts taken place. The Arab spring is an important landmark to think of when relating this to the reading.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 11:51 AM

This describes human characteristics that defined this region because it shows how ancient artifacts are being unearthed through new-age technology.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 19, 2015 10:49 AM

Space archaeology only makes sense.  If we have the capability for satellites to take pictures of earth from above why shouldn't it be used for archaeological analysis?  I am sure that this is only the tip of the iceberg as far as what we will see in the future from this specific field. This article/video just lends more credibility to the fact that Archaeology should function as an interdisciplinary field.

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Free Technology for Teachers: Three Ways To Look At The World As A Village

Free Technology for Teachers: Three Ways To Look At The World As A Village | Geography Resources for Secondary Students | Scoop.it
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great introduction for Global Communities - could use it as a comparison with Australia & then Mildura

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Growing pains: Caroline Springs and Point Cook rate poorly for liveability

Growing pains: Caroline Springs and Point Cook rate poorly for liveability | Geography Resources for Secondary Students | Scoop.it
Point Cook and Caroline Springs are planned suburbs – so what went wrong?
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Why everyone should take a geography class, especially now

Why everyone should take a geography class, especially now | Geography Resources for Secondary Students | Scoop.it
Geographical literacy remains vital—particularly for those of us who live in (for the time being at least) the world’s preeminent military and economic superpower. Geography is necessary for understanding why the overthrow of a government in Libya contributed to an unprecedented surge of migrants into Europe, why Ukraine has been split between East and West amid its conflict with Russia, and why China’s neighbors are alarmed at the new islands under construction in the South China Sea. And as we learned during last year’s Ebola panic, an understanding of African geography could have helped explain why an outbreak in West Africa should not lead to the quarantining of people from Kenya or Tanzania. In the years to come, as the effects of climate change on everything from sea level rise to deforestation to drought quite literally reshape the world we live in, an understanding of geography will be necessary for mitigating and adapting to the consequences.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 18, 2015 11:52 AM

A basic understanding of geography is a prerequisite for any informed citizen, and globalization means that is even more important than ever.  

TagseducationK12geography education.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, October 7, 2015 7:39 AM

Geographical literacy

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Is it time to scrap "Eastern Europe"?

"Europe’s divisions are indeed grave. But counting the ex-communist countries as a single category is outdated and damaging "


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Vermont Social Studies's curator insight, October 6, 2015 8:47 AM

Danube Europe? Roma Europe? Scared of Russia Europe? Solvent Europe? Could be a great learning exercise to have your students decide and justify the best new term.

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, November 4, 2015 7:15 PM

I don't know what else you'd want to call the region. Western Asia? Western Russia? I understand that the culture isn't particularly what one would think of when they think "Europe". Regions are like nicknames, you don't get to pick your own (unless you're Howard Stern).

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 7, 2015 11:53 AM

It's true the term Eastern Europe is very outdated because borders are constantly changing. Also different ethnic groups and geographic differences that make up the region divide the west and east. However, some countries such as Greece wants to be more Europe and the countries surrounding it are not really "western". So by labeling countries by fixed region is not very accurate in terms of where they are located on the map.

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Maps That Prove You Don't Really Know Earth

You'll never trust a map again. Check out more awesome BuzzFeedBlue videos! http://bit.ly/YTbuzzfeedblue1 MUSIC “Phat Hair Day” Licensed via Warner ...
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great for showing how mercator projection distorts the size of continents relative to each other and why

 

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Daily chart: Syria’s drained population | The Economist

Daily chart: Syria’s drained population | The Economist | Geography Resources for Secondary Students | Scoop.it
OVER the past few summers—when the paths are clear and the seas calm—Syria has churned out high numbers of migrants and refugees. But this year has seen the...
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Geography: What is it for? - YouTube

This animation is designed to help teachers to tune into the grand narrative of Australian Curriculum Geography.
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useful explnations about purpose of Geography in the AC (from SA perspective but generally applicable).

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Why Mercator for the Web? Isn’t the Mercator bad?

Why Mercator for the Web? Isn’t the Mercator bad? | Geography Resources for Secondary Students | Scoop.it

"As you may know, Google Maps uses the Mercator projection. So do other Web mapping services, such as Bing Maps and MapQuest. Over the years I’ve encountered antipathy toward the use of the Web Mercator from map projection people. I know of two distinct schools of opposition. One school, consisting of cartographic folks and map aficionados, thinks the Mercator projection is 'bad': The projection misrepresents relative sizes across the globe and cannot even show the poles, they are so inflated. The other school, consisting of geodesy folks, thinks mapping services have corrupted the Mercator projection, whether by using the wrong formulæ for it or by using the wrong coordinate system for it."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 30, 2015 8:41 AM

In this article you will find a thoughtful discussion of the reasons why the Mercator projection is disliked by many, but still so prevalent.  In ArcGIS online, you can Search For Groups and then enter Projected Basemaps to see many map projections on that platform. For more resources on understanding map projections, click here


Tags: mapping, visualization, map projections, cartography, perspective, unit 1 Geoprinciples.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, October 7, 2015 7:42 AM

Mercaror ArcGis

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Teaching the Geography of Food

Teaching the Geography of Food | Geography Resources for Secondary Students | Scoop.it

"Food. It’s something we all think about, talk about, and need. Food has been one major topic of interest at National Geographic because it connects all of us to our environment. The recent global population projections for the year 2100 just went up from 9 billion to 11 billion, making the issues of food production and distribution all the more important.  For the last 3 years I’ve stored podcasts, articles, videos, and other resources on my personal site on a wide range of geographic issues, including food resources.  I thought that sharing 10 of my personal favorite resources on the geography of food would be helpful to understand our changing global food systems."


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Claire Law's curator insight, April 26, 2015 2:01 AM

Ten engaging resources on the geography of food

Kaiden-Leigh Cloete's curator insight, April 29, 2015 11:15 PM

This topic connects to our agricultural unit. This article describes the explaining of food. Knowing where our food comes from is a big component in lit today, with all the GMO's going around we don't know what we r busy consuming daily. Having more information in our minds about food would help decrease the long term affects of genetically modified organisms, help maintain a healthy economy, provide more resources such as water, because if GMO's do come to an end then the water will not be as polluted as it is now due to the runoff from the remaining chemicals in GMO's, and also provide a healthy environment for everyone. 

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 26, 2015 2:10 AM

I absolutely love this article. It touches on many of the most important and challenging issues facing food production in the world, ranging from food manufacturing ethics to global hunger. I think it's interesting how, although we all eat food everyday, we don't think about the many implications associated with the production and consumption of food. To more privileged people, food is not a big deal, as anyone can get food at any time of day. However, for people who are trying to solve the problems associated with food in the modern world or for people who are suffering from hunger and malnutrition, the information presented in this article is extremely important. Brilliant minds can come together to propose potential solutions for all the problems facing food distribution. I can't wait for the day every child can go to bed with a full stomach, and I am willing to do my part to help make that happen.

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Waging War Against Global Food Waste

Waging War Against Global Food Waste | Geography Resources for Secondary Students | Scoop.it
National Geographic Emerging Explorer Tristram Stuart wants the world to stop throwing away so much good food.

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Year 9: Food Security

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 21, 2014 2:22 PM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates.   You can hear more about Tristram's work in this TED talk


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

Deborah Jones's curator insight, October 25, 2014 9:58 AM

PSA

Alex Lewis's curator insight, November 21, 2014 12:18 PM

I think this is a great idea, and the more we reduce our food waste, the better. We can use this food to feed the starving, which would solve two problems at once. Also, the idea of feeding the excess food to the pigs is a good idea. Not as good as conserving the food to give to the needy though. 

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How to Read a (Good) Map

How to Read a (Good) Map | Geography Resources for Secondary Students | Scoop.it

"Just as you shouldn’t trust everything you read or see on television, you should never blindly trust information just because it is on a map. All maps posit arguments. Maps present information about how something is. All maps posit arguments. Maps present information about how something is. Just as there are no unbiased arguments, there are no unbiased maps."


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John Slifko's curator insight, November 23, 2013 5:09 PM

Map skills are vital in the study of democratic place and space. 

YEC Geo's curator insight, November 24, 2013 4:44 PM

Good advice.

Ignacio Garrido's curator insight, November 26, 2013 1:09 AM

Exercise 14 :

 

Read the news and answer the questions:

 

a.What is the news talking about ?

b. There are two maps.Maps that is down has these questions ( Answer them ) :

Who made the map?What is the purpose of the map? That is, what is the map attempting to communicate?Who is the intended audience? (It is important to remember that the map may not have been designed for you, but a more specialized audience.)Does the map effectively achieve its communication goals? Does it present an interesting story or argument?

c.Sum up the news ( five sentences in english )

d.Choose another map ( of Internert  if you want ) and answer the questions 1,2,3 i 4. Add the map.

 

Send by moodle.Good luck¡

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Assessing the Validity of Online Sources

Assessing the Validity of Online Sources | Geography Resources for Secondary Students | Scoop.it
Like so many things today, I found this wonderful image on one of my social media networks.  The discovery of this fantastic map is symbolic of the opportunities and challenges of 21st century educ...
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Government: Behind the News

Government: Behind the News | Geography Resources for Secondary Students | Scoop.it
Check out some reports from our viewers around the world, and perhaps get some tips on how you can make a report for BtN!
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great idea to help students understand the election process

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