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Debt of Sisyphus: Greek economy’s coma is a misguided political experiment

Debt of Sisyphus: Greek economy’s coma is a misguided political experiment | Geography resources | Scoop.it
Austerity is destroying the free part of the Greek economy, leaving government more dysfunctional than ever. Worse news: it will need yet another bailout...

Via Enrique Ferro
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Please read article and use summary sheet

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South Africa HIV & AIDS Statistics

Estimated number of people living with HIV in South Africa, and estimated AIDS deaths: analysis of statistics from the major recent studies.

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Mapping Europe's war on immigration

Mapping Europe's war on immigration | Geography resources | Scoop.it
Europe has built a fortress around itself to protect itself from ‘illegal' immigration from the South, from peoples fleeing civil war, conflict and devastating poverty. The story is best understood through maps.

Via Seth Dixon
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Marist Geography's curator insight, October 17, 2013 8:05 AM

This shows how Europe controlles entry into its borders. With MEDC's being favoured over LEDC's

François Arnal's comment, October 21, 2013 11:32 AM
https://www.facebook.com/events/462634527184992/
François Arnal's comment, October 21, 2013 11:33 AM
A "Café géographique" with Philippe Rekacewicz" in ST Dié des Vosges for the International Festival of Geography. https://www.facebook.com/events/462634527184992/
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Smarter Food: Does big farming mean bad farming?

Smarter Food: Does big farming mean bad farming? | Geography resources | Scoop.it
In Minnesota, ‘industrial’ operation shows effort to balance economic, environmental sustainability.

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Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:33 AM

The large-scale agricultural practices of modern America tend to lend to the bad image of commercial farming. However, the practices are actually helping feed more people in the US, but they also use genetically modified crops and other highly debated techniques.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 11:45 AM

Yes it does because in all large scale endeavors, regardless of what for, the quality is always sacrificed for the quantity because it becomes cheaper to produce and profits are greater.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:56 PM

In the long run, a successful farmer needs to find a balance between economic and environmental sustainability.  Some big farms are working towards that so the 'big-equals-bad' narrative about agriculture may be easy, but it doesn't tell the whole story about modern agriculture. 

 

Tags: GMOssustainability, agriculture, agribusiness

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ObamaCare: It's the Law, But for How Long? | FreedomWorks

ObamaCare: It's the Law, But for How Long? | FreedomWorks | Geography resources | Scoop.it

FreedomWorks is a grassroots service center dedicated to helping activists fight for lower taxes, less government, and more freedom. ("It's. The. Law." So was DOMA, Welfare reform and Prohibition.


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Big Racial Divide over Zimmerman Verdict

Big Racial Divide over Zimmerman Verdict | Geography resources | Scoop.it
Overview The public is divided over the not guilty verdict in the George Zimmerman trial and over the conversation about race that has surrounded it. The

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 28, 2013 12:13 PM

Sometimes people refer to the 'culture of the United States' or the 'geography of Florida' in the singular.  While this is grammatically correct, it obscures the reality that there are many 'cultures of the United States' and that there are intertwined 'geographies of Florida' that help explain why the George Zimmerman case and Trayvon Martin's death are such lightning rods of debate about social justice, race, class and gender these days.   

RockMe on the Road Glen and Maureen's curator insight, July 31, 2013 8:45 AM

Is anyone really surprised?

Audrey's comment, September 9, 2013 6:07 AM
When certain groups start judging human beings as one race with different, equal ethnicities maybe the debate will make sense.
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Germany Fights Population Drop

Germany Fights Population Drop | Geography resources | Scoop.it
As German towns work to hide the emptiness, demographers say a similar fate awaits other European countries, with frightening implications for the economy.

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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 17, 2013 8:55 PM

Yes, identity!

Holly Hough's curator insight, December 8, 2013 3:35 PM

Germany is undergoing a population crisis. The population is plunging due to a high number of elderly people (the dependency ratio is 1:4) and the desire of women to be in the workforce. As a result, the women are not having children. There is a large number of young people who have obtained educations, but are unable to find work, which makes them less likely to want to have kids and start a family. This is a push factor for them to immigrate to another country where they can find work. This leaves Germany with higher dependency ratios and pushes them further towards economic crisis. Germany and many other European countries are offering incentives to women to have children, such as 24 hour child care, tax breaks, and money for married couples. Some fear fertility rates have fallen below replacement level. Just what will Germany do, “part of the solution lies in remaking values, customs and attitudes in a country that has a troubled history with accepting immigrants.” Germany will have to work to pull immigrants to their country to regenerate their population. Who knows where Germany will be 50 years from now?

Sarah Ziolkowski's curator insight, December 31, 2013 11:05 AM

This article applies to how values and preferences impacts an area. For Germany, their low birth rates are being caused by highly valuing  single mothers and discouraging immigrants to stay in their country.  These  unfavorable birth rates may be a future for many other highly developed countries, or already are a part of many countries. This could happen to your home, so your values or preferences may be come a problem to the economy. Low birth rates and unwelcomed immigration are causing decreased work force and increased demand in Germany, that they can't fulfill. It also causes an uneven population between the young and old population. 

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What Religion Does Your Member Of Congress Identify With?

What Religion Does Your Member Of Congress Identify With? | Geography resources | Scoop.it
A breakdown of Congress' religious makeup. One nation, under God, with liberty and justice for all.

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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 24, 2013 8:02 PM

Cultural geography! Very intersting!

Adilson Camacho's comment, August 24, 2013 8:03 PM
http://mappingmormonism.byu.edu/?page_id=12
Hannah Hitchcock's curator insight, December 13, 2013 2:09 PM

This map adds interesting insight to how Religion might affect Congress. America is a very Christian country, supported by the map. The other non-Christian religions are shown to be condensed in to small or isolated areas. This also supports the stereotypical ideas we have of the regions in America. Baptist for exapmle, is highly popular in the south. This is typically the religion we associate with the south. The Mid-West is an area with a high Mormon population, therefore it makes sense that the representatives fom those states consist of Mormon religious people. 

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Miss America crowns 1st winner of Indian descent

Miss America crowns 1st winner of Indian descent | Geography resources | Scoop.it
She's the second consecutive New York beauty queen to take the Miss America title, but she's the first Indian-American to wear the national crown.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 16, 2013 1:17 PM

Quoting directly from the article, "Racists took to Twitter to lambaste the pageant for picking an Indian-American."  This got me the thinking about the topic from multiple perspectives.  First of all, the United States is becoming increasingly diverse as the white population's fertility rate is slowing and this is seen as emblematic of that shift.  But does disagreeing with the pageant's evaluation of beauty make all of the critics racists?  Certainly not; although I'm sure their was a strong racist undercurrent to the much of the criticism, the pageant seeks to quantitatively measure and rank beauty.  The idea of beauty is culturally constructed and varies based on the cultural milleu of the individual; there is perhaps nothing more subjective in the world, and the criteria for beauty has changed over time, and certainly various across space as many culture value different attributes.  Why is anyone arguing about the bias in the selection process of Miss America when the process is inherently subjective and based on the cultural preferences of the judges?  Maybe the real question is this: why is anyone evaluating the worth and importance of women in society based on evening gown poise and swimsuit appearance?              

Linda Alexander's comment, September 16, 2013 11:55 PM
I agree with your overall assessment, Seth, but do feel the twitter feed is worthy of further examination. I also noted that this winner, for a change, is advocating for girls in the STEM fields and appears to be quite different from the norm. She looks different, thinks different and acts different. Is that another reason for the unsettling discomfort that sparked the racists remarks? Yes, but sorry, but the world really is changing folks, so deal with it. Anyhow, it's a step in the right direction when beauty is not defined by age-old standards, thinking and behavior. However, at the end of the day, I don't particularly like beauty contests either and didn't watch this one....
Alison Antonelli's curator insight, September 25, 2013 7:32 PM

I think this is really cool. That is something to be extremely proud of, to be the first Indian-American to win Miss America.

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These Are All the Places That Europeans Actually Discovered

These Are All the Places That Europeans Actually Discovered | Geography resources | Scoop.it
Of all the places you think were discovered by Europeans, how many were actually discovered by Europeans?

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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, August 31, 2013 3:01 PM

Really?

Ignacio Garrido's curator insight, September 4, 2013 6:18 AM

Exercise 1

 

Read the new :

 

1. What was the first country in discover another place ? and the last one ?

2. What decade were the discoveries in ?

3. Why does the author of the new write "discovered" ?

4. What kind ( geographical characteristics ) of territories are the mostly of the discoveries ?

5. Give your personal opinion about text

 

Answer it on the Moodle plattform. Good Luck ¡¡

Remember put the number of exercise ¡¡

 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 5, 2014 5:03 PM

This mpa depicts the European discoveries that have transpired throughout the years and where they have been invented in Europe. Many of them have been created in regions near Portugal and the Spain/Austria Hungry regions. This shows you the percentage and the amount of people it has affected in each region.

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Public Transit and Density

Public Transit and Density | Geography resources | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 14, 2013 10:25 PM

This image is an excellent visualization to use when teaching about density, public transportation and urban planning. 


Questions to Ponder: How is this a persuasive image?  Do you argee with the argument that the planning office is making? Are there something important factors that this image ignores?


Tags: transportation, urban, planning, density, sustainability, unit 7 cities.

Imran Ahmed Khan's comment, January 17, 2013 3:44 PM
Good picture! It defines the growth of the city that impact on urbanization rate, public health, socioeconomic environment. It also tell us that if we reduce vehicles on the road more space and clean environment may we get, that reduce motality and morbadity of several disease especially lung diseases.
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, April 8, 2013 9:31 PM

What are the benefits for each?  Drawbacks? You decide!

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Population influx in city linked to rising pollution - The News International

Population influx in city linked to rising pollution - The News International | Geography resources | Scoop.it
The News International
Population influx in city linked to rising pollution
The News International
The survey says population density in Pakistan was 231 in 2012-13.

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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, July 22, 2013 1:45 PM

This is a major problem in peripheral countries

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BBC NEWS | Country Profiles

BBC NEWS | Country Profiles | Geography resources | Scoop.it
BBC Country Profiles: instant guide to history, politics and economic background of countries and territories, and background on key institutions.

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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, July 25, 2013 7:45 PM

Better than VIA Factbook

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History of HIV & AIDS in South Africa

The history of HIV and AIDS in South Africa including the early days, controversies, denialism, civil disobedience and future prospects...

Factors influencing HIV prevalence

 


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Uganda: Eliminating HIV/AIDS in Children - AllAfrica.com

New Vision
Uganda: Eliminating HIV/AIDS in Children
AllAfrica.com
Uganda: Eliminating HIV/AIDS in Children.

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Chinese couple sells babies for iPhones and shoes, authorities say

A Chinese couple faces charges after allegedly selling three newborn babies for $13,000 and using the money to pay for iPhones and shoes, authorities said.


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We’re a Culture, Not a Costume

We’re a Culture, Not a Costume | Geography resources | Scoop.it
Controversy surrounding racist Halloween costumes have become a routine part of the holiday on college campuses.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 22, 2013 8:45 AM

Halloween costumes, especially at college-aged parties are designed to shock, push the boundaries of acceptability and do things that you normally 'wouldn't be able to get away with.'   These students at Ohio State are pushing back a little, reminding classmates that Halloween isn't an excuse to be racist...where is the line?  I don't have all the answers to that but think that it is worth considering BEFORE Halloween night.  


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First indigenous map of its kind; U.S. map displays “Our own names and locations”

First indigenous map of its kind; U.S. map displays “Our own names and locations” | Geography resources | Scoop.it

"Aaron Carapella, a Cherokee Indian, has taken it upon himself to create a map that shows the Tribal nations of the U.S. prior to European contact. The map is of the contiguous United States and displays the original native tribal names of roughly 595 tribes."


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Gladysthecoach Cruz's comment, July 25, 2013 6:49 PM
Love this great idea. But where would I start?
Ishola Adebayo's comment, August 2, 2013 8:59 AM
good
Kyle Kampe's curator insight, September 3, 2013 10:15 PM

Native American culture and experience has different tenets than that of the European Americans.

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Kids React to Controversial Cheerios Commercial

Kids React to Controversial Cheerios Commercial | Geography resources | Scoop.it

"Here, kids watch the needlessly controversial Cheerios commercial featuring a biracial family and comment on it. None of them can tell the interviewer what’s wrong with the spot.  The video is part of a Fine Bros. series that has kids, teens, and elderly people react to viral videos, news stories, or trends."    


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Audrey's curator insight, August 14, 2013 3:50 PM

This is an example of what results when youngsters are given the freedom to express their own opinions on media representations without adult intervention.

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Rap, Drugs, And Hijabs: 13 Things You Should Know About Young Iran

Rap, Drugs, And Hijabs: 13 Things You Should Know About Young Iran | Geography resources | Scoop.it
The future of Iran will be determined by the first post-Revolution generation. Here's what they're like.

Via Seth Dixon
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Siri Anderson's curator insight, August 25, 2013 9:52 AM

Who knew? Would be nice to have students develop some raps that appealed to democratic, peaceful, shared-world sensibilities.

Mrs. B's curator insight, October 5, 2013 9:36 AM

POPULATION PYRAMIDS!

Isabelle Zahn's curator insight, January 18, 2014 3:02 PM

In this article you see the concept of gender population and folk culture. This article talks about how Iran has had their baby boom population in there right now between the mid teens and the mid-20s. It also talks about how all of the young people are starting to control everything and things are becoming run by the young people. Most of the government is run by young people there all of the young people are just starting to pop up and down getting married as you get there I having more kids because it's a big huge population of young people. This has an impact on every music sucks local national and international communities because every community at some point will have a baby boom generation for us right now it's kind of an older generation for other countries the younger generations so really every time she goes through these baby-boom stages. Some short-term effects of this could be a lot of new births because all the people are starting to get a little bit older because their mid teens to mid 20s they will be getting married soon and will want have families.  Some long-term effects could be another baby boom generation possibly coming because of this baby boom generation all the side to have kids that he couldn't another baby boom generation were everybody wants to have a kid so their country may decide to good use birth control or something that will reduce the chances of having another baby good population because their country can't support all of those people. 

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Cycling Culture in Copenhagen

Cycling Culture in Copenhagen | Geography resources | Scoop.it
More than a third of Copenhageners bike to school or work, but it hasn't always been that way -- and city officials say that's not nearly enough.

Biking here was stress-free — quite a contrast to my route to work in Seattle, which one international bike expert recently called “death-defying.”


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 21, 2013 11:34 AM

Forms of transportation are typically seen in terms of technological developments, but the cultural institutions can either support or hinder the diffusion.  In Copenhagen, bikes are as common as vacuum cleaners because of a cultural movement supported by political initiatives to incentivize cycling and promote sustainable transit and active lifestyles.  Read the first part of this series where an American tourist is pleasantly baffled by European cycling culture. 

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, September 1, 2013 5:44 PM

Very good! 

Sarah Ziolkowski's curator insight, January 1, 2014 6:25 PM

This article applies to the  concepts of culture unit, specifically the diffusion section. It talks about Copenhagen's new cycling culture emerging after the government's efforts to neutralize CO2. 36% of the city's population bikes to work or school, a number they'd like to increase. However, they are still well ahead of The United State's highest percent in Portland, Oregon of 6%. Copenhagen's action could be a model for your community to change to biking. 

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Muslim beauty pageant challenges Miss World contest

Muslim beauty pageant challenges Miss World contest | Geography resources | Scoop.it

"Muslim women from six countries defy western beauty ideals, emphasize spirituality.  Organizers of the event said they wanted to show Muslim women there is an alternative to the idea of beauty put forward by the British-run Miss World pageant. They also stress that opposition to the pageant can be expressed non-violently." 


Via Seth Dixon
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Rawr_adventuretime's comment, October 3, 2013 1:27 PM
This is social because the gender relations is women defying ideas of beauty and expressing beauty through spirit instead of body and looks c:
Mrs. B's curator insight, October 5, 2013 9:34 AM

What do you think?

Hannah Hitchcock's curator insight, December 13, 2013 1:54 PM

This article is a really good example on how beauty is a cultural perception. American pleople have a skewed idea of beauty, those shown above not being in that category. In other countries, these women might be extreamly beautiful, but the American perception doesn't believe the same things.  

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The Middle East, explained in one (sort of terrifying) chart

The Middle East, explained in one (sort of terrifying) chart | Geography resources | Scoop.it

"What could be simpler than the Middle East? A well-known Egyptian blogger who writes under the pseudonym The Big Pharaoh put together this chart laying out the region’s rivalries and alliances. He’s kindly granted me permission to post it, so that Americans might better understand the region. The joke is that it’s not a joke; this is actually pretty accurate."


Via Seth Dixon
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BandKids13-14's comment, August 28, 2013 9:50 AM
Did anyone else notice that both Al Qaeda and the U.S. are FOR syria rebels, and against Assad?
Avonna Swartz's curator insight, August 30, 2013 11:13 AM

Interesting and (as it says) terrifying.

Todd Parsons's curator insight, September 2, 2013 10:06 AM

So we should have peace in the Middle East in maybe 7.59 billion years when the sun goes all red giant and we all burn up anyway. However, in the meantime...check out this cool chart of friends and foes. It all makes sense now, yah?

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Mexican Company Outsourcing Jobs to the United States

Mexican Company Outsourcing Jobs to the United States | Geography resources | Scoop.it
                                                          (ABC News) Within in the next three years, one out of three babies born in the United States will be Hispanic.

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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, May 14, 2013 10:54 PM

Bimbo bread is Big here in Fresno!

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China's reliance on coal reduces life expectancy by 5.5 years, says study

China's reliance on coal reduces life expectancy by 5.5 years, says study | Geography resources | Scoop.it

........"Linking the Chinese pollution data to mortality statistics from 1991 to 2000, the researchers found a sharp difference in mortality rates on either side of the border formed by the Huai River. They also found the variation to be attributable to cardiorespiratory illness, and not to other causes of death."

 

High levels of air pollution in northern China – much of it caused by an over-reliance on burning coal for heat – will cause 500 million people to lose an aggregate 2.5 billion years from their lives, the authors predict in the study, published in the journal the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 29, 2013 9:44 PM

We talked in class about how certain poor working conditions or pollution emissions are permissible in countries whose laws allow for such situations, and how countries like the US arrange for certain work to be done in those countries.  This 'work' stuff all centers around an ever-necessary "profit" that exists as a carrot being dangled in front of a horse as it runs all of its life, blinded to everything else.  It is almost cartoonish, that for a percentage increase in profit due to minimalized expenses, a moral businessman might yield and give in to the temptation of exposing workers to dangerous conditions... or that all businesses might do the same thing... It is socially dangerous; a hazard like bullying, or cheating, using others as human shields to collect the damage while someone else collects the benefits.  I don't think that any life form should be exposed to such unfairness, because it just does not resonate with my philosophical consciousness that any individual should have a better life than another (or worse).  And why make it worse for someone?  Why pollute their areas?  Why steal their natural resources?  Why... Capitalism at all?  I do not think greed is innate to human nature, because selflessness does occur, and is often leaned towards in conventional modern morality/ethics.  I think that the vicious cycle that capitalism puts us in causes us to self-servingly run around like angry rats trying to feed ourselves, which causes us to take out risks on other people, and polluting other people's living space.  It really is sad, because this planet is alive... there is so much life on this planet, assumedly and debateably from this planet, this planet that we consider our home.  To be killing ourselves by not keeping our home clean and healthy is like a very bad habit- it's like smoking.  And it is taking a toll on the planet, as well as its inhabitants

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 2014 11:20 AM

This article and the accompanying resources describe the damage the pollution problem China has in its cities. China's economic desire to do things as cheaply as possible for the best profit margins has done significant damage to the air and now to its own people. By burning cheap coal to meet energy needs China has created a fairly toxic atmosphere in its Northern cities. The pollution is causing high rates of cardiorespiratory illness and even the government-controlled news can't keep quiet about the issue.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 5:28 PM

This article explains how China is burning an abundance of coal for heating. The Chinese population is over 1 billion; image the amount of coal that must be burned in order to supply heat for the people of northern China. Unfortunately, the burning coal is polluting the air and causing the Chinese to have lower life expectancies. China, along with other countries should start to find other ways to heat their homes.