Geography Portfolio
Follow
Find
114 views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Paige McClatchy from Geography Education
onto Geography Portfolio
Scoop.it!

Venice sinking five times faster than thought?

Venice sinking five times faster than thought? | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it

Venice, by virtue of its geographic situation will always be sinking as a course of nature.  A research team from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the UCSD has recently concluded that Venice is sinking 2 millimeters per year...not catastrophic on a single year basis, but threatens the long-term viability and sustainability of the location. 

 

Urban ecology: what economic forces created the rationale for building Venice?  What environmental factors are currently threatening it?  Will economic or environmental forces win out? Location: do the economic advantages of a location outweigh the environmental liabilities of the location?  How do these competing factors influence the development of a city?  For additional information on this story see: http://www.physorg.com/news/2012-03-venice-hasnt.html


Via Seth Dixon
Paige McClatchy's insight:

So not only is Mexico City sinking, but Venice is as well, and five times faster than we thought at that. If the heart of an urban, sprawling city becomes completely destroyed what changes will be made to the outlying areas? Will they break up into multiple, smaller districts each with a central area? Where will the rich who used to reside in the heart move to?

more...
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, September 30, 2013 8:47 PM

The famous city in Italy is sinking, and quickly.  It seems that the transient opportunities of a transient town are like that of other areas exposed to natural inclemence- such as New Orleans, and earthquake zones.  Sooner or later, places that are exposed to disaster will become inhabitable, and possibly abandoned.  When I hear of this city sinking, it makes me think of the Titanic, and how people should likely jump ship out of this situation, before the whole city 'goes under.'  I also think of marshy areas that would not be well-suited for development and inhabitance, and it seems that there is a history in the town that united people to live there in spite of the abundance of water.  Some of my ancestors were from Italy, and I wouldn't want harm to come to their homeland, but it really makes me wonder why they chose such a place to live...  It seems likely to me that the mere fact that it was sinking was not really considered much back then;  they were not as realistically concerned about the longevity of the city in the long run, than they were about the 'now' and the time at hand.  This reflects many facets of humanity and the hedonistic lifestyles that accompany many humans.  Humans that live for today and forget about tomorrow are doomed to live a life of sorry.  Humans that live for tomorrow and not today are out of touch and fail to seize the day.  Humans that live for today but remember tomorrow are the masons that build stairways to new lands for their descendents, and along with that, myriad new possibilities for positive opportunities.  I think some of the wisdom of Italy was put into its architecture and structural design, so that we might remember- we are dying in this life, just as Venice sinks, but we should live life as best as we can, and pave the way for future generations.  Like so, the dumping of wastes into the ocean seems tiny at first, but accumulates over many generations and will leave many ocean species dead, and harm the overall functionality of the Earth as a whole.  Let Venice be a reminder.

Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 8, 2013 3:36 PM

Day to day, even looking into next year the rate of 2 millimeters per year may not seem drastic.  To a city that has been around for hundreds of years, it's assumed the city plans to stay standing for hundreds more.  Considering the age of the city, say in a couple hundred more years, some buildings could begin to take in water.  It is also possible that certain parts of the city could be sinking faster than others.  There is a similar situation in Mexico City where it was built on a lake and each year that source diminishes due to the demand of water by its residents.  Certain parts of the city are sinking and some buildings are slanted due to the results.  These cities are beautiful  but reality shows that as time passes, it will probably only get worse.  Hopefully preventions can be taken to at least reduce the speed of sinking so that people after us can appreciate the architecture and atmosphere the city has provided all these years.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 12:11 PM

Venice is a city that capitalized on its geography and developed canals so the city could grow despite being so close to sea level. Now that sea levels are rising, Venice is in trouble because its survival is dependent on the water levels, as they become out of control Venice will not be able to withstand the change. There are similar circumstances like in the Maldives where global warming and rising sea levels will put entire countries under water.

Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Paige McClatchy
Scoop.it!

From Lorde to Gin Wigmore, New Zealand punches above its weight

From Lorde to Gin Wigmore, New Zealand punches above its weight | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
I should have been a singer. That’s how you conquer the world these days. At least it’s how you become rich and famous if you are a New Zealander, like…
Paige McClatchy's insight:

Playing off perceived exoticism is putting New Zealand in the spot light this year. The country has turned out a few notable musicians of late, giving the country good press. Most people in America think Lord of the Rings when they think of New Zealand, but perhaps once the country is more on our radar due to other pop phenomena we will learn about it more.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paige McClatchy from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Vanuatu: Meet The Natives

"Five men from the remote Pacific island of Tanna arrive in America to experience western culture for the first time, and force us to look at ourselves through brand new eyes..."

 

This cross-cultural experiment reinforces numerous stereotypes, but also seeks to get viewers to look at issues from a variety of perspectives.  Folk cultures, modernization and globalization are all major themes of this show.     


Via Seth Dixon
Paige McClatchy's insight:

This promotion for the series "Meet the Natives" is a laughable cross-cultural experiment in forced globalization. While there are many political and cultural problems with this video, perhaps the Vanuatu people are less isolated and exotic than we really think. It's naive to think they are totally backward with no interest in connecting with the world.

more...
Jennifer Lopez's curator insight, December 15, 11:26 PM

This is great I also viewed a little of the other videosprovided. I believe this can be a mix of pop culture and Folk cultur mix together if that makes any sense. For example this is coming from a point of view of Folk people that live in rural areas. We as people living in the USA see different vidos of citizens going to these areas and experiencing  a once in a  life time momment. But its amazing to see how they view our Urban area our pop culture gives you a different prospective in your life, a snse to look at things a bit different for once.  

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 4:24 PM

The beauty of this video is not that it shows a group of people coming from a remote area but instead provides a outside view of western culture. These men come from a life so different culturally and materially form our own that their unbiased view is fascinating to see. This mixing of cultures is almost a kin to when young Amish leave their communities to see the world and then decided to remain or return to their homes. While the show may focus on the differences between those in the USA and those living in their village I'm sure many innate human qualities remain the same between both groups. 

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 17, 7:36 PM

I always find it amazing when people who are from different parts of the world visit America for the first time and experience the things that people here experience on a day to day basis. With their visit here, their misconception about seeing America as the land flowing with milk and honey is usually thrown out the window one they start facing hardship and difficulty. With these video these people from Australia, get a first site of how New Yorkers live their life. One thing that struct me was how they regarded poverty and homelessness here. As the world's most powerful country, USA has yet to combat and overcome its poverty issue. Those who were visiting, regarded homelessness as people who are unloved. Its sad because as a community, we are responsible for those who are less fortune, yet people in our very backyard are dying of hunger on a day to day basis. 

Rescooped by Paige McClatchy from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Finding the flotsam: where is Japan's floating tsunami wreckage headed?

Finding the flotsam: where is Japan's floating tsunami wreckage headed? | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it

Scientists model where and when the debris from the March 2011 Japanese tsunami will be.  The likelihood that the debris (not radioactive) will reach the U.S. west coast is increasingly likely.  Look at the great video attached to the article.   


Via Seth Dixon
Paige McClatchy's insight:

Hopefully none of the wreckage that reaches the US is radioactive.... But the projected travel of the debris shows how ocean currents create, almost, a "natural" globalization of natural disasters. 

more...
Brett Sinica's curator insight, December 10, 2013 5:02 PM

This video showed time elasped which stopped in the summer of 2013, it is now December.  At the time of the video the mass was entering the eastern part of the Pacific Ocean so I'm curious to where it is now.  I can't find any current imagery of the vast ocean but it would be a neat, yet dangerous spectacle.  I could only imagine any of the harm it's causing on the sealife on its way across the pacific.  We can only hope that doesn't bring too many issues once it washes up on the west coast, if at all.

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, September 1, 10:43 AM

Although it's important to know where all of this trash is headed, this just makes me think of how we might prevent this. We can't prevent these catastrophic natural disasters, but how might we lessen it's effects on our cities and settlements? Furthermore, how might we lessen our impact on ecosystems during these times of catastrophe? 

It's only called a catastrophe when it hits human populations for a reason, it's not just devastating to us. Remnants of our lifestyle are carried far and wide, able to cause harm on many other species. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 4:37 PM

An example of how even without considering globalization the world is interconnected. The debris from the 2011 tsunami was never disposed of effectively and the United States may be effected more than they ever expected. If this pile of debris reaches US shores it will make many Americans consider how a tsunami across the globe will eventually hurt them at home. 

Rescooped by Paige McClatchy from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

A Tit for Tat: A Spratly Island Spat!

If you haven't yet discovered http://www.plaidavenger.com/ I recommend exploring it (numerous World Regional resources). You'll find its brand of geography has a whole lot of personality; you'll decide soon enough whether that personality works for your classroom.  This particular 'plaidcast' discussion focuses on political geography, the Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ), and the strategic importance of overseas exclaves using the Spratly Island example in the South China Sea.

Minor correction to video: Territorial waters only extend 12 miles offshore, not the 200 miles of the exclusive economic zone. 


Via Seth Dixon
Paige McClatchy's insight:

The conflict over the Spratly Islands is similar to the more current dipute between Japan and China over similar rocks. The rocks are not desired, however, for their land value but for their potential for oil, and exclusive economic zone-ability. The Spratly Islands are clearly closest to the  Philippenes (in my opinion) but that doesn't make it simple. Perhaps in the future islnds like these will have no claim over them, and revert to international territory?

more...
Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 10:01 PM

Depending on what age group and what grade level you're teaching this may or may not be the right video to use. I personally think he's funny yet informational. I would like to use this in a classroom of middle schoolers. Obviously this plaid cast wouldn't be appropriate for first or second graders, but it has potential for other grade levels.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2:30 PM

This is definitely an interesting tool to use in the classroom. But it also gives the viewer an animated expression of geographic topics. The EEZ that make countries fight over small useless islands because it allows for access to profitable seas. I like this goofy host and the way he takes on serious topics in a way that makes them engaging for people who would otherwise be bored when just reading about it in a text book.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 17, 8:08 PM

I truly believe that if a World War III erupts, it will solely be the fault of China. China isn't contempt with the current land it possesses. As one of the world's super power, China is trying to expand its territory to become a holder of the global economy. Not solely on China, but countries that lie on the South China Sea are claiming the scattered island that lies in the middle of the sea. But the problem comes with the definition of how much land outside of a country can a country possess? If China were to possess this land, what would happen to all of the natives?

Rescooped by Paige McClatchy from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Decoding Bangkok’s Pocket-Urbanization: Social Housing Issues + Community Architects

Decoding Bangkok’s Pocket-Urbanization: Social Housing Issues + Community Architects | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it

This is modern cosmopolitan Bangkok, the second most expensive Southeast Asian city after Singapore.  Along with explosive city growth, the demand for urban housing has increased substantially. Due to a lack of sufficient and affordable housing, communities have settled into the cracks, eliciting a diagnosed social and institutional ‘pocket-urbanism’ that forms barriers of interaction among communities, and certainly between communities and authority figures...


Via Lauren Moss, Seth Dixon
Paige McClatchy's insight:

The poor of Bangkok have been settling their communities in the cracks of wealthier areas, creating a phenomenom of "pocket-urbanization." The artical talks about an emerging "ethical turn" in architecture. People will certainly enjoy their lives better when they are empowered in their own living situations, but also we have seen how poor infrastructure is a target for the worst of natural disasters. Rebuilding these areas would be good for many parties.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paige McClatchy
Scoop.it!

Chinese moon rover launched successfully

Chinese moon rover launched successfully | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
China's first lunar rover deployed successfully from the unmanned spacecraft Chang'e-3 that landed on the moon Saturday.
Paige McClatchy's insight:

China has now joined the US and the former USSR to be the only nations who have soft-landed on the moon, complicating the geopolitics of space. Space has always been the final frontier; the US landing on the moon first was a major victory for the American nationalist project in the Cold War. China is flexing its scientific muscle, and this landing certainly symbollically increases the nation's power, even though it will probably not contribute any drastic knowledge to what we already know about the moon.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paige McClatchy from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Incredible Shrinking Country

Incredible Shrinking Country | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
There are “babyloids” and relatives-for-rent in an increasingly childless Japan.

 

While many parts of the world are concerned with population growth, Japan is struggling to find ways to slow down the demographic decline.  What economic and cultural forces are leading the the changing nature of Japanese demographics?  A video that explains the changing nature of modern Japanese relationships and gender norms can be accessed here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/01/30/japan-population-decline-youth-no-sex_n_1242014.html


Via Seth Dixon
Paige McClatchy's insight:

Japan's shrinking population poses many challenges to the state, namely a shrinking work force. While Japan is a very developed country, it still needs people to continue its growth. Perhaps the government should subsidize families with more than one child? a la reverse One Child policy. As I'm sure Japan would not welcome an influx of Han Chinese.

more...
Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 7, 2012 12:52 AM
This article helps to see why population is declining so rapidly in Japan. There is not just one contributing factor, but many factors. There is a high suicide rate and low birth rate. Many single Japanese women decide not to have children, while countries such as the US, many single women choose to have children. Japan's high divorce rate will also cause decline in population. Al of these factors that contribute to the decline in Japan's population is hurting the economy. If the population does not start to increase, Japan will be further in trouble.
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 6:30 PM


Japan in the future will have a great economy because there will be more people working than being retired collecting a monthly check. Which means they have more taxes coming in than being given out and they can use that extra money to help create better things for their society.  It also could mean they wont have so much of a deficit like the United States does.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2:14 PM

In Japanese culture older generation are taken care of by their decedents. With more and more people not having children it is going at odds with long standing cultural traditions. What will happen when these people are no longer able to take care of themselves and have no one to turn to for assistance. Japan will  have to adapt and consider solutions that go against their norms regarding familial structure.

Rescooped by Paige McClatchy from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Worker safety in China

This is an incredible video because of the shocking footage of blatant disregard for worker safety.  This can lead to an interesting discussion concerning how China has been able to have its economy grow.  What other ways has China (or Chinese companies) been "cutting corners?"  How does that give them a competitive edge on the global industrial market?     


Via Seth Dixon
Paige McClatchy's insight:

This video is jaw-dropping proof of how China cuts corners in their quest for growing their economy. With such a large population looking for work China does not really need to protect their workers. I wonder if China will experience a labor movement similar to the one in the US that introduced protective legislation.

more...
James Hobson's curator insight, November 21, 9:11 PM

(East Asia topic 6)
This video signifies two distinct characteristics of labor in China. First and most obviously is the disregard of safety. One could argue in the past that risks such as these were accepted by workers since China was a largely less-developed country with fewer employment opportunities; however, being a recent video and China  currently making exponential economic and developmental ground, this is definitely one of those 'things which shouldn't be happening'. With all of the nation's so-called "improvements," why are none discernible  here?

  Secondly, traits such as subservient respect are valued more in nations such as China. It is possible that if these workers hadn't have taken the risk and not completed the job, they would've been fired and had a somewhat 'tainted' reputation for not following their orders to demolish the building.

  Though it seems that all industrializing nations have gone through issues of workers' safety and reasonable expectations, China should use it's late-coming as a plus by learning from others which have gone before it, and avoiding the personal, legal, and even some social issues which have been faced before.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 1:52 PM

China's ability to sweep unjust working conditions under the rug has allowed it to grow economically at an impressive rate. Although I disagree with unsafe working conditions it is important to note the hypocrisy that developed countries display when advocating fro workers rights. In the US for example, our economic growth was contingent on slavery, child labor, and immigrant exploitation. Unfortunately if any developing country wants to compete with countries that are at the top of the global economic hegemony, they must cut the same corners those countries cut centuries ago. What needs to be done is find a way to show developing countries that growth is possible without abusing workers. 

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 5:23 PM

This video borders on difficult to watch. While it is definitely amazing to watch it really flies in the face of standard American job safety operations. These workers are perched on top of this building with no harnesses balancing in the shovel of a back hoe while sawing loose great slabs of concrete. Luckily no one was injured in this video but frankly this video does a great job of showing how China has been able to grow so rapidly. A lack of interest in individual workers safety and a sole goal of progress, at the possible cost of its citizens.

Rescooped by Paige McClatchy from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Al Jazeera-Nepal's Forest Future

Al Jazeera-Nepal's Forest Future | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
In Nepal, government owned forests are being felled at record speed, while community managed ones are thriving.

 

This is a great link for discussing governance and the environmental interactions and community.   


Via Seth Dixon
Paige McClatchy's insight:

The deforestation of Nepal to supply the growing needs of India is an example of how growth in one country strips another of its resources. While Nepal may gain in the short term form logging away their forests, deforestation has steep long term costs. Many people live off the forests and their disappearance could threaten to ruin their culture.

more...
Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 13, 2013 12:07 AM

This shows want can be done to help preserve some of the natural habitat that we all need to live.  While the government lands are being used, illegally, though the government does nothing to stop it becasue of the economic stimulus it provides the lands given too the commnity are surviving and actually striving.  So why can't something like this be done in the Brazilian rain forest.  Set some of it aside to the community so they can maintain it, let it grow so that one of the most important natural resoures on this planet just doesn'tend up as ashes.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 23, 1:05 PM

Rapid population growth and development in a country can lead to dangerous resource drains, both illegal and legal, in neighboring countries. India's growth demands more wood, and Nepal has been trying to supply their demand. In the last 20 years, 25% of Nepal's forests have been harvested for the logging industry. The demand for wood and rising prices has caused an illegal logging industry that threatens non-governmental forests. Luckily, in the 1980s, Nepal handed over 25% of the forests to communities, who have worked to preserve them.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 3:09 AM

This is really a sad thing to behold, these jungles which for many many years have provided resources to both wild life and resources for the people of Nepal. Unfortunately now partially because of globalization these jungles are far more valuable for their lumber than as living forests. The destruction of the environment such as this is a huge catastrophe for the world as a whole. Ideally the government or foreign powers will do something to prevent the entirety of the forests from being cut down.

Rescooped by Paige McClatchy from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

India's Census: Lots Of Cellphones, Too Few Toilets

The results of India's once-in-a-decade census reveal a country of 1.2 billion people where millions have access to the latest technology, but millions more lack sanitation and drinking water.

 

More Indians are entering the middle class as personal wealth is transforming South Asia's economy in the private sector.  Yet the government's ability to provide public services to match that growth still lags behind.  Why would it be that it is easier to get a cell phone than a toilet in India?  What will that mean for development?  


Via Seth Dixon
Paige McClatchy's insight:

This NPR podast reflects the geographic theme of development, specifically the uneven development of India. Despite a rising economy, the infrastructure of the country is not keeping up. While many people buy things, have "personal wealth," they live in conditions that betray their poverty.

more...
Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 23, 10:10 AM

Government in India may be ill equipped to handle the need for sewage, sanitation and clean water. These items are harder to come by than cell phones and televisions. Over 1/2 of the country lacks basic sanitation, but yet, have cell phones. This dystopia is leading to even people climbing out of poverty from having some of the basics needed for a healthy life.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, November 29, 3:41 PM

Its interesting in a country as large as India, its number one problem is waste management. Its telling of the priorities of the country's leader and it also speaks on the country's reception of first world waste. While more than half of Indians have access to a cell phone device, television and other electronic products, its also embarrassing on the country's behalf that less than half of the country's population have access to toilets.

I believe the case for this is Indian government not have the proper equipment to be able to establish properly install proper sanitation in the land. In order for the government to put in place they would need to establish a proper pipelines throughout the land to ensure that once toilets are set in place, waste is properly disposed of.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 12:59 AM

This sound clip highlights an interesting issue today in India, as the population has exploded the logistics to support these people is nonexistent while access to modern technology is present. Its an odd concept that one can readily find cheap accessible technology such as cell phones or TVs yet something as basic as a toilet or running water is out of reach for many. This is the problem when a population expands faster than it is possible to increase its logistical capacity.

Scooped by Paige McClatchy
Scoop.it!

WATCH: U.S. Relations In The Middle East In Less Than 3 Minutes

WATCH: U.S. Relations In The Middle East In Less Than 3 Minutes | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
For those of you who are confused as to where the United States stands in the Middle East (world leaders included), look no further: this handy map can teach you the nuts and bolts of American relations in the region in less than three minutes.
Paige McClatchy's insight:

While I wish this video/map had a legend (it was dechipered for me in the following article), it does provide a good way to visualize the relationship of the US to various countries in the Middle East throughout the 20th Century.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paige McClatchy from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Religious architecture of Islam

Religious architecture of Islam | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
Read Religious architecture of Islam for travel tips, advice, news and articles from all around the world by Lonely Planet...

 

This is an excellent article that can be used in a thematic class for analyzing religion, the human landscape, the urban environment and cultural iconography.  For a regional geography class, this show great images from Indonesia, Spain, Egypt, Syria and Israel/Palestine.  


Via Seth Dixon
Paige McClatchy's insight:

Studying the architecture of Islam makes it so obvious that, of course, Islamic peoples pushed the frontier of knowledge whe Europe was rediscovering how to write words. In today's world I feel like Islam is portrayed as "backwards" and completely stuck in time. Perhaps their social policies do not seem to catch ours in terms of modernity and progress, but there is no denying that Muslims do have extremely elegant and complex modes of expression.

more...
andrew desrochers's curator insight, October 28, 2:47 PM

These architectural designs in Israel show religious meanings, what other factors inspire architectural creativity? Who uses these different styles of creativity?

Lily and Cami's curator insight, November 5, 5:18 PM

Israel Religion: I scooped this because the picture really stood out to me because the golden dome stands over the rock on Temple Mount. you also can see great images of Indonesia, Spain, Egypt, Syria, and Israel/Palestine. Not only are these sacred buildings but they are also big religious and tourist attractions.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 1:20 PM

Although all part of the same religion these buildings are influenced heavily by their location. I think this is important to note because it challenges our assumptions on Islam. When I think of a mosque a certain image pops into my head, these images shows how the same religion can still have local influences.

Rescooped by Paige McClatchy from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Gender Divisions in Iran

Gender Divisions in Iran | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it

For my non-Farsi speaking readers, this map displays a 'male' province and a 'female' province.  These two provinces are separated by barbed wire, 20-meter trench and the Great Wall of China with ground-to-air missiles.  

 

While not a "cartographically accurate" map of the divisions within Iran, it does symbolically highlight the enormous gulf between men and women.  Men and women are not in separate provinces, but what might the symbolic spatial gender division on this map represent for Iranian society? 


Via Seth Dixon
Paige McClatchy's insight:

Political cartoons like these are very effective at using satire for criticism. The author's analysis seems to get at the heart of the issue here- gender realtions- as the map tries to give a "geography" to gender inequality. It was important that the author noted that "Islam’s rules for segregating the sexes are open for interpretation - and are applied with a huge degree of variation throughout the Muslim world" as this is congruent with the diversity of the Middle East we have been trying to understand.

more...
Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 2:01 PM

I think this picture shows how Iranian society thinks and operates. There is an entirely different set of rules, ideals, and codes men and women follow in their society. Women are typically held inside, wear head coverings, are not allowed to be in the public sector unless accompanied by a man or her husband. This map isn't real, but it does show that if they were in separate provinces, there would be a gender division that could spring a revolution for women to be educated and empowered, and it could also hurt the economy because ultimately a society needs women to have children to ensure there is a workforce.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 29, 4:16 PM

A map is a very powerful symbol.The image depicted above is no exception. Despite the fact that the division stated above is not physically accurate it is a strong metaphor. In the country of Iran there is a "great wall" dividing the genders. Woman and men are not viewed in the same light. Men have far more rights than woman.This is an ongoing battle and until it is resolved this country will not be complete.

 

“A house divided against itself cannot stand”-Abraham Lincoln.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 1:15 PM

An extreme exaggeration that still addresses a real issue in Iran. Although there is no barb wire and missiles that divide genders in Iran there are cultural as well as structural barriers that keep men in the public sphere while women are kept in the private sphere. 

Rescooped by Paige McClatchy from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Penguins from Space: A New Satellite Census Doubles the Known Population of Emperors

Penguins from Space: A New Satellite Census Doubles the Known Population of Emperors | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
High-resolution imaging has allowed scientists to produce the first full count of Antarctica's emperor penguins...

 

Before this, there was no way to to gather reliable penguin statistics.  Geospatial technologies are now providing us the tools to teach us more about the biogeography of penguins.  The applications of geospatial technologies are endless.   


Via Seth Dixon
Paige McClatchy's insight:

I wonder when this geospatial technology will be used to spy on humans, maybe it already has! It is important, however, to learn more about Antarctica, the alien continent of the world. This is a victory for science.

more...
Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, September 1, 10:22 AM

Our world is changing rapidly. Both due to human activity and natural climate patterns. It's important to be able to quantify the effects of this change in order to understand how our world will continue to change. If we can correlate these specific changes in climate and weather patterns and declining/rising species populations we may be able to protect important species in decline and manage those on the rise. Using geospatial technologies is vital in studying these changes and will only improve and become more valuable in time.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 16, 7:48 AM

In the beginning of the semester we talked about how geography is always changing. Our understanding of geography does as well. This new technology helps people have a clearer picture of the wildlife that exists on Antarctica. Because of its harsh environment the amount we know about this barren continent has been limited. As technology improves we will be able to gain more accurate information about Antarctica.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 16, 12:58 PM

Using this new technology, animal can be monitored and helped by the satellites. Having a way to accurately know the population of a species is incredible,  because now we can know which species are in danger of extinction and we can take steps to help them. Before the use of the satellite,  the population of Emperor penguins was found to be 595, 000 and the colonies of penguins was found to be 46 instead of the previous 38, so without this technology there have been penguins that may have needed help, but now they will get proper attention.

Rescooped by Paige McClatchy from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Lurking in the Deep

Lurking in the Deep | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
Divers on Australia's Great Barrier Reef recently snapped rare pictures of a wobbegong, or carpet shark, swallowing a bamboo shark whole.

 

The diversity of life on this planet and the ecosystems which such creatures live in is something that continually leaves me in awe at the wonders of the natural world.


Via Seth Dixon
Paige McClatchy's insight:

The Great Barrier Reef is a natural world wonder that needs to be protected. Even though it seems like Australia does a lot to protect its shores (a huge source of tourism) accidents, like the BP oil spill can happen, and even accidents far away can send shock waves to such a fragile ecosystem.

more...
Jennifer Brown's curator insight, December 10, 6:44 PM

The wobbegong or carpet shark has amazing coloring! I'm glad they eat other sharks and not people. The camouflage this shark has would be deadly for something not "shark" related. I'm glad someone did capture this photo though because it's probably something I'll never get to see again.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 4:36 PM

Amazing photos, there are so many different kinds of life that exists in the Ocean. As the Great Barrier Reef falls victim to climate change and pollution, the number of species at risk is almost calculable. 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 16, 1:26 PM

Australia's marine life is amazing, being able to hide by blending in to their environment is a testament to the waters that Australia has. The diverse wildlife of Australia waters is shown to be an adaptive bunch and begs the question: How many more animals are out there that we do not know of?

Scooped by Paige McClatchy
Scoop.it!

Tsunami Record Discovered in Indonesia Cave : DNews

Tsunami Record Discovered in Indonesia Cave : DNews | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
A cave on the Indonesian island of Sumatra is providing a 'stunning' record of Indian Ocean tsunamis over thousands of years.
Paige McClatchy's insight:

The discovery of tsunami records in a cave of Sumtra suggests that tsnuamis are not evenly spaced through time. Perhaps scientists can study the time patternt to better predict when the next natural disaster will strike, and lead to more preventative action.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paige McClatchy from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Unusual ways to avoid Jakarta's traffic

Unusual ways to avoid Jakarta's traffic | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
Jakarta's traffic is legendary and locals have now become experts at finding ways to get around the jams, with some even making money out of them.

 

The population of Indonesia is heavily concentrated on the island of Java, and the capital city of Jakarta faces a tremendous strain on it's transportation network.  This video show that resourceful people will find inventive ways to make an unworkable situation manageable. 


Via Seth Dixon
Paige McClatchy's insight:

People will always find ways to adapt to their environment- adapt or fail. This video is just simply amazing. I hate sitting in traffic on I95 but imagining a 20 mile drive taking three hours is insane. Its a shame that Indonesia's transmigration program was coercive and deceptive. 

more...
Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 1:12 PM

As urban population growth rises, transportation systems will be put under greater strain. Jakarta's transportation crisis is one of the worst in the world, and people sit in traffic for hours traveling to work or to do errands. Due to incompetencies in the system, people are finding different ways to make travel easier. Motorbike cabs as well as people standing on street corners offering to be passengers in order for cars to travel in the car-pool lanes are two ways people are getting around. These underground transportation services are illegal, but their extent cannot be contained by law enforcement. 

 

Jakarta, as well as many other cities, are continuing to grow due to the global trend of people moving into urban areas. With more people than ever choosing to reside in cities instead of rural areas, new transportation systems will need to be developed in order to accommodate for growth.  

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2:35 PM

The amount of traffic in Jakarta is staggering and the traffic itself has built up a business of making commuting to work easier. What is troubling is that the government hasn't made enough of an effort to fix the problem of traffic in its largest and most economically viable city. If Jakarta wants to keep growing the government has to step in and find a way to make getting to work realistic for Indonesians.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 9:38 PM

The traffic in Jakarta is insane, to be in a constant standstill on your way to work is unreal. The reporter in the video says that if the city of Jakarta continues on its current path, it could be "in a state of Paralysis" which for an entire city is not good. The traffic has, for some, become a way to make money, illegally but money nonetheless.

Rescooped by Paige McClatchy from Regional Geography
Scoop.it!

Drought led to demise of ancient city of Angkor

Drought led to demise of ancient city of Angkor | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
The ancient city of Angkor — the most famous monument of which is the breathtaking ruined temple of Angkor Wat — might have collapsed due to valiant but ultimately failed efforts to battle drought, scientists find.

 

Why do societies collapse?  Often they are overextended, consume too many resources for their hinterland network to supply or they aren't able to adapt to changes to the system.  Angkor Wat, the largest urban complex of the pre-industrial world, collapsed primarily due to drought conditions and a changing ecology.  Without sufficient water resources, the network collapsed.  What other environment 'collapses' can you think of?   


Via Seth Dixon
Paige McClatchy's insight:

This new study shows that even back in time people struggled with environmental challenges. We normally think of people in the past as being much more adaptive to their environments and that only in the modern age nature and humans have come into conflict. The surrender of Angkor Wat to drought shows that even though we have amazing technology today, water is still a staple of life. 

more...
Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 12:29 PM

It's easy to forget that for most of history, even the greatest of empires were subject to the whims of the climate. The ability to survive in places where humans really shouldn't thrive is only a recent development thanks to technology, but a drought is something the mightiest army can't fight, and all the wealth in the world will not stop, without the right technology.

James Hobson's curator insight, December 4, 9:12 PM

(Southeast Asia topic 10 [independent topic 2])

Naturally, that which fails to adapt to its environment will not survive. Such was the likely fate of Angkor. But was this early industrial area the cause of its own drought demise? I'll answer this question with another modern one: Are booming metropolises of today having an impact on their environment? Look at the American Southwest, where the booming populations of Las Vegas and Phoenix, and the water use that goes along with it, are slowly sucking dry Lake Mead. Though in both cases the climate is becoming drier itself, adaptations could be the remedy. Just as the inhabitants of Easter Island caused their own demise as well, it truly pays to learn from the past and take proactive precautions to prevent such worse-case scenarios. Luckily today there is knowledge to do such that, and now the issue goes to getting that message acknowledged and acted upon.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2:37 PM

This reminds me of the theories as to why Easter Island fell. Although what many people know of Easter Island is the giant heads, there was once a flourishing civilization in the area but many scholars theorize that they deforested the island to a point that they ran out of resources and had to flee to survive.

Rescooped by Paige McClatchy from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

This little piggy is going to China

This little piggy is going to China | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it

This photoblog will also link you to a full article and video that explains how the American pork industry is supplying China's demand for protein as globalization forces (among others) has led the Chinese consumers to eat 10% more meat than they did just 5 years ago.  WHat impact will this have on American agriculture?  How to we explain fo the rise in meat demand in China?    


Via Seth Dixon
Paige McClatchy's insight:

Chinese farmers cannot keep with with Chinese demand from pork, so America is stepping in to fill the gap. The globalization of American pork seems like it would benefit American farmers and Chinese consumers, but the environmental cost of raising so many extra pigs on American land must be considered, as well as transportation costs to ship it to China.

more...
Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 7, 2013 8:28 PM

Read the linked article. How is China dealing with its increasing appitite for meat?

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 1:35 PM

We never focus on the goods leaving the United States and being imported to China. American pork is filling the demand in China and because globalization has made it cheap to ship exports, China is responding by eating more pork because it is affordable. This is important in keeping American exporting business afloat. There are plenty of pigs in the US to provide large numbers to foreign countries. I also find it interesting that what Americans would consider a staple of so called "Chinese food" is being exported from the US. 

Rescooped by Paige McClatchy from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Chinese Uighurs' economic fears

Chinese Uighurs' economic fears | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
Amid ethnic tensions, minority regards modernisation plans in Xinjiang as favouring Han Chinese migrants.

 

With not as much cultural cachet in the West as Tibet has, the Uighur population in China has still dealt with many of the same political problems in their struggle for greater autonomy, but with much less publicity.  With massive Han Chinese migration, they've become minorities in their own homeland.  


Via Seth Dixon
Paige McClatchy's insight:

The fact that the region is China's highest producer of natural gas but it also one of the poorest regions in the state is an interesting contrast to the wealth enjoyed by oil states in the Middle East. Add to the situation the ethnic marginalization of the Uighurs, and the violence between them and the Han Chinese, and the situation sounds like it could put an unpleasant international spot light (yet again) on China.

more...
Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 18, 2013 8:25 PM

The Uighur people are being left out of their own homeland.  The Chinese government has sent many Han Chinese to this area.  So many in fact that the Uighur are a minority in their traditional and ancestral homeland.  The Han are getting the jobs and going to be running the new gas operations that will surely be developed by the Chinese.  Why has this not been as reported in the west?  Is it becasue the people are mostly Muslim?  The same thing happened to Tibet, but that area seems to get more press.  Or is there going ot be more of a spotlight on this area givin the natural gas that has been found in this area?  Going to be interesting area to watch as this area becomes more developed.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2:00 PM

Uighurs are being pushed out of their homeland because of Han Chinese migration. This article is accurate when it claims that the amount of publicity the region gets is minimum. This makes the Uighurs more at risk than Tibet. With so much attention put on areas elsewhere, China will face less international push back as it over takes yet another region who wishes to maintain its autonomy and culture.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 5:54 PM

I believe that without doubt today it is a bad time to be a minority in China. The Chinese are experiencing a great deal of nationalism and in turn placing economic barriers on the minorities in order to drive them out of regions so the government will be able to repopulate them with Han Chinese. While the Han Chinese have always been the majority within China its only recently the government has decided to provide them with advancement at the risk of the other ethnic groups within China. 

Scooped by Paige McClatchy
Scoop.it!

Bangladesh hangs opposition leader

Bangladesh hangs opposition leader | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
Abdul Quader Mollah execution is the first for crimes related to the country's 1971 war of independence.
Paige McClatchy's insight:

The execution of Abdul Quader Mollah in Bangladesh has increased pre-election tensions to what has been called a "micro-civil war." Bangladesh became independent in 1971; are these still growing pains? Once political stability is reached can the state begin tackling other structural state problems? Or is it the other way around?

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paige McClatchy from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

South Asian floods take economic toll

Environmental degradation, seasonally high rainfall, a low elevation profile and climate change combine in a very bad way for Bangladesh.  Flooding, given these geographic characteristics, is essentially a regular occurence.   For a more in-depth look at these issues from the same media outlet, see: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wj0iZiivYJc&feature=player_embedded#!


Via Seth Dixon
Paige McClatchy's insight:

The "socio-economics of flooding" is a side of the natural disaster we don't normally think about. People most affected by floods tend to live in areas with poor infrastructure and large populations. Their displacement to cities, like Dhaka, has incredible cost. For both the family and the new place they relocate to. 

more...
Matt Mallinson's comment, November 7, 2012 3:41 PM
The people that live here understand that they will have flooding every year. They're smart to build elevated roads so they have some way of transportation over flooded areas. It's weird to think that this is a normal thing for them and for us we close everything down and wait in our houses.
Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 7, 2012 12:17 AM
In an area already stricken with poverty, the floods manifest the problems. High rains and low elevations cause massive floods in areas such as Bangladesh and Nepal. Most areas do not receive aid, especially the remote areas of the villages.
Rescooped by Paige McClatchy from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Muslims masquerade as Hindus for India jobs

Muslims masquerade as Hindus for India jobs | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
Facing religious discrimination in the Hindu-dominated job market, many are forced to assume fake identities.

Via Seth Dixon
Paige McClatchy's insight:

I wonder if India will ever adopt any anti-discrimination legislation that will protect Muslims from prejudice. The partition of India and Pakistan was largely for religious, then political reasons, but the lived reality does not translate to all Muslims in Pakistan and all Hindus in India.

more...
Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 8:46 PM

In the marketplace, one of a different religion has to mask her true identity to be able to sell the food there. Not only is this woman facing pure discrimination she is facing it because of what she believes in. Nothing is more horrible than being stripped away from something you believe in. In order for her to sell food in this marketplace, she must do so to survive.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:11 PM

In the marketplace, one of a different religion has to mask her true identity to be able to sell the food there. Not only is this woman facing pure discrimination she is facing it because of what she believes in. Nothing is more horrible than being stripped away from something you believe in. In order for her to sell food in this marketplace, she must do so to survive.

Jackson and Marduk's curator insight, October 27, 4:03 PM

Religion: The main religion in India is Hindu. Since this is so widely practiced in India, other religions are discriminated. This article explains how some people have to act like they practice Hindu just to get a job.

Rescooped by Paige McClatchy from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Slideshare: Middle east flags

 Looking for an easy online method of sharing and using powerpoint presentations?  Slideshare is made just for that.  Here is one I made of Middle Eastern flags a while back, showing the cultural patterns and similarities among the flags.  Students are quick to note that the Israeli flag sticks out and "doesn't fit in well visually."  


Via Seth Dixon
Paige McClatchy's insight:

These flags have a lot in common: I know at least from my own background that green is the color of Islam (in fact, I studied a Newsweek cover about the new "Green Scare" comparing Green/Islam to Red/Communism in the minds of Americans). Each flag is also beautifully geometric, keeping in line with the  inheritance of Islamic art. Of course the US Coalition would design such an ignorant flag for Iraq- we basically thought it was ours in 2004. Quick in, quick out, everyone wins. As we know today that is not the case....

more...
Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 29, 2013 4:11 PM

Many of these countries share similar backgrounds and cultures, as well as flags which is seen above.  The color patterns show red, black,  white, and green on almost every flag except Israel's which is blue and white.  It shows that most of the countries within the region are all linked somehow whether it be through language, identity, or other reasons, though there is still room for conflict and change as time passes.  After looking at flags from other countries such as Iraq and Iran, the graphics on them change, sometimes reflecting government changes.  It is sometimes difficult to remember and notice so many flags, yet some of these flags have changed within the last 2 to 3 decades to accompany the change of government.

Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 2:06 PM

This goes to show how a flag is supposed to represent the people who live in their country. And the flag of Israel really does stick out like a sore thumb. We have the crescent moon, the typical Arabic colors of green, red, black, and white, and the blue and white really doesn't have much to do with the history of the people who live in Israel, only the new Jewish community who live there, but not the Palestinians. 

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 29, 11:36 AM

Representation of middle eastern flags,

Rescooped by Paige McClatchy from Regional Geography
Scoop.it!

Shiite and Sunni: What are the differences?

Shiite and Sunni: What are the differences? | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
While the two sects share the same basic beliefs, differences in hierarchy and doctrine make Catholics and Protestants an apt comparison.

 

Too often we categorize all Muslims together as though they all thought the same things and share the same beliefs.  Although the divisions within the "House of Islam" run deeper that the Sunni/Shi'a split, it is the best starting place to get a nuances senses of regional differences among Islamic groups. 


Via Mr. David Burton, Seth Dixon
Paige McClatchy's insight:

The Christian Science Monitor's attempt to categoraize the differences between Shiit and Sunni Muslims is a good effort but I can't help but feel like its just scratches the surface. I would have also liked to know how each sect views government, gender relations, and, geographically, where each sect has dominance. These other measures would have provided a more comprehensive portrait. I would say, however, that the tone was fair and detatched.

more...
Derek Ethier's comment, October 25, 2012 11:06 PM
It is amazing how different sects of the same religion can evolve. Their argument over the successor to their religion carved a divide that would be felt over a millennia and felt even today. In Iraq, when the Shiite majority attempted to rebel against their opressive government, Sunni leader Saddam Hussein murdered thousands of Shiites. The fight continues in other countries as well.
Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 20, 2013 12:44 PM

It is important to know the differences here.  It also seems that the most extreme sects are coming from the Shiite sect even though they only make up about 15% of the Muslim population.  They are centered in Iraq and Iran from the old Safavid Empire which took the Shiite sect and put them in conflict withthe Ottomans who took the Sunni sect.  This led to many wars in this areas between these two Muslim empires from the 16th to 18th century. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 12:06 PM

I think as Americans we should definitely know the difference between Sunni and Shiite. Our foreign policy in the Middle East is so dependent on our understanding of the Islam and I think it is imperative that Americans avoid lumping all Muslims into one category and ignoring the differences within the worlds largest religion.