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Cultural Perspectives

Cultural Perspectives | Geography News | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Jacqueline Landry's insight:

when I look at this the first thought that comes to mind is it is easy for other people to judge. just by there comments they have no idea what the others beliefs are,. This is a classic judging a book by it's cover. The are both assuming it has to do with a male dominating world. I think it has to do with what you are comfortable with. 

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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 21, 2013 3:52 PM

This cartoon reminds me of what a fascinating time we live in with the internet and streaming videos.  Just a few hundred years ago people thought dragons walked down the streets in china, now there are a handful of documentaries on the Chinese new year.  Wars have been fought using propaganda of us vs. them but now I could skype with a kid in Syria right now and find out what he thinks and has seen.  I hope as all of the world cultures acclimate to each other we adopt a live and let live mentality. 

Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 7:12 AM

This political cartoon is just another great example of how different cultures are across the globe. Here in America, we are told that the appropriate swimwear to wear to the beach only covers about a third of our body. Where as in the Middle East, wearing a burka is what they are told is the right type of clothing to wear. Whether it be for religious, cultural, or fashionable reasons, women wear all types of clothing and I don't believe it is directly due to male influence. There are many things that could cause this influence such as the church, family, or the media. Yet as the cartoon says, each woman thinks the men in that country are forcing them into wearing clothes like that and their culture is dominated by men. I guess it just shows the different perspectives each culture can have. 

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 9:51 PM
This cartoon depicts the cultural differences between two different cultures. On the right you have a woman in a traditional burka that covers all but her eyes. On the left you have a woman in a bikini which is what is apropriate to wear on the beach or to bed. Two totally different societies and beliefs and they both look at one another and see the other person as inapropriate. This is not the first time another country has looked at the USA and turned their nose up to something that we do differently.
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10 Places You're Not Allowed to See on Google Maps

10 Places You're Not Allowed to See on Google Maps | Geography News | Scoop.it
Google maps brings the world to your desktop - well, most of it, anyway. Here are 10 locations that governments and other entities have blurred or removed from satellite photos.

 

A user of geospatial technologies is not free to explore all places of the Earth with equal levels of specificity. Why?  Where?  How come?


Via Seth Dixon
Jacqueline Landry's insight:

When I was working on my environmental classroom assignment I came across an area that I couldn't see from above, only the fence that wrapped around it. At first I thought that couldn't happen but it makes sense for government reasons.  a security reason. 

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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 6, 2012 4:41 PM
I must say I'm fairly surprised there were not more then 10, unless that is just the number chosen for this article.
Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 18, 2013 6:15 PM

although we like to think that we are able to go anywhere on the world wide web some locations are off limits. Google Earth allows us to see place we have never been. However, some place are not available for us to see due to security reasons. Google Earth has restricted the public to view certain images of locations.

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‘How to Build a Country From Scratch’

‘How to Build a Country From Scratch’ | Geography News | Scoop.it
The filmmakers present a 12-step program to establish the world’s newest country: South Sudan.
Jacqueline Landry's insight:

1.start to panic

2. Pick a name

3. Learn to sing your anthem

4. Choose a capital

5. Welcome your people

6. Invite ban  ki-moon

7. Honor  your flag 

8. Cherish your past

9. Collect first taxes

10. Train the police

11. Refrain from invasion

12. Don't stick to your guns

 

what is important is governance.  there needs to be establishment of order first- government and the political constitution. Then to enforce the law, with that comes economics and taxation. After the foundation is set then worry about the identity of the country. 

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Rare snow storm hits Middle East

Rare snow storm hits Middle East | Geography News | Scoop.it
A rare snow storm hit the Middle East last week, producing record snows and extreme conditions for Syrian refugees.

Via Seth Dixon
Jacqueline Landry's insight:

Yes anything can happen, even snow in the Middle East. 

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 26, 11:59 AM

When snow hits the Middle East, Syrians are affected in different ways. Refugees fight the bitter cold outdoors. The Middle East is not used to snow. Areas are forced to go into shut down because they do not have the tools or skills to battle this rare weather. 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 4, 11:33 AM

So strange to see an area that I think of as the desert covered in snow. They all seemed to be enjoying it though. Is this a side effect of global warming?

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 12:16 PM

I live in New England, so there isn't much to say about an oddball snowstorm. Yes, its weird that it happened randomly in Syria but the fact is that mother nature can surprise us more often than not.

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World's Most Thrilling Airports

World's Most Thrilling Airports | Geography News | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Jacqueline Landry's insight:

Some of these airports look to me as if planes won't make it. The one in Portugal goes over mountains and trees and is very short. Flying can be terrifying as it is but landing on some of these airport can be more nerve racking. This raises a question, was this the only land area these countries had to build a runway? 

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sonia monetti's curator insight, October 24, 2013 7:16 AM

scherzetto............

Caterin Victor's curator insight, October 27, 2013 1:02 PM

Amazing !!!

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 2:09 AM

Most people are scared enough to even go on a plan much less having to deal with some of these runways. This horrid runways include high altitude, short runways or even 90 degree turns to even advance onto the runway. Pretty scary if i might say so myself. Im surprised the St Maartens runways didn make the list with its threat of hitting a popular beach in the local proximity.

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Ramen To The Rescue: How Instant Noodles Fight Global Hunger

Ramen To The Rescue: How Instant Noodles Fight Global Hunger | Geography News | Scoop.it
The supercheap and palatable noodles help low-wage workers around the world get by, anthropologists argue in a new book. And rather than lament the ascendance of this highly processed food, they argue we should try to make it more nutritious.

Via Seth Dixon
Jacqueline Landry's insight:

I think everyone has had ramen noodles at some point in there life. I do enjoy ramen noodles here and there but couldn't eat it daily. I have found in some of my cookbooks they use ramen noodles in their recipes. It is mostly the quick and easy recipes.  if we are the 6th highest country that purchases ramen noodles I am convinced everyone eats it. 

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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 9:06 PM

Ramen became an essential food to help the people who were starving all over the world. This food is cheap to buy and easy to make so it is a perfect food to feed millions of people who are starving everyday. The only bad thing about it is that it is not very healthy to be eating constantly. 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 9:10 AM

Its pretty crazy to think something as simple as ramen noodles can help feed billions of people. in the western world iramen is the butt currently for running jokes about poor college kids, i never thought it would have this impact. I can now say that ramen is a nessicty in some areas. Who cares about the slight health affects because if some of this people didnt have ramen they would already be dead from starvation. 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 26, 12:12 PM

I am sure almost every person in this country has eaten instant noodles at one point in their life. Due to the fact they are very cheap and enjoyable. Today, many impoverished people all over the world eat these instant noodles, as they are economical. Although they are not a nutritious, they can temporarily relieve people’s hunger.

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Hydraulic Fracking

Hydraulic Fracking | Geography News | Scoop.it

"Hydraulic fracturing, or 'fracking', is the process of drilling and injecting fluid into the ground at a high pressure in order to fracture shale rocks to release natural gas inside."

 


Via Seth Dixon
Jacqueline Landry's insight:

The development of gas is important for energy but there are health and safety risks with cracking in neighborhoods. Quality of air and water is important for survival. Nature matters and people matter, they need to find a middle ground. 

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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 10:07 AM

Fracking is happening in some peoples backyards and it is effecting how they live. People are directly in this unhealthy atmosphere. It is causing bad things to happen to peoples health. It is especially ruining their water which is needed to cook, drink, and clean. Water is needed in our everyday lives to survive and fracking is contaminating their water. 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 9:17 AM

Great visual aid about the dangers of fracking. this article is obviously siding with antifracking beliefs so it may be a little biest but in all honest facking may be the worst form of producing energy in the past 100 years. Offshore drilling may be unpleseant to see but as long as it dont exploded then the ecosystem around it stays intak. Fracking on the other hand can be evident miles down the road with chemtrails and runoff. I can understand why people do alot of things for money but devastating the local water supply when there is multiple new ways to produce clean energy is just shameful. 

Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:37 PM

Hydrographic Turing puts people in  safety and health risks. Because the water is contaminated and because of the oil spills, blow outs, and fires. They put chemicals into the ground in order to make cracks in the earth to collect natural oil, but they use people's land in order to collect the oil. People are complaining about these industries because they now have to buy water every month instead of getting it from their sinks or wells. Not to mention some houses have already blew up or caught on favor thanks to hydro fracturing. They need to put a stop to this, at least do it on land that is not being used and far away from people.

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Before and after: Tornado cuts devastating path through Oklahoma

Before and after: Tornado cuts devastating path through Oklahoma | Geography News | Scoop.it
Explore the Bing map, or Google map of Moore, Okla. More on the Oklahoma tornado:

Via Seth Dixon
Jacqueline Landry's insight:

I look at these pictures and I can't help but feel bad for the people that were apart of this tornado. In minutes your whole life can change. The picture of the corner house there before the tornado and afterwards nothing, your whole life changed. I couldn't imagine the heartbreak these families went through, loosing everything. 

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oyndrila's curator insight, May 26, 2013 8:58 AM

Images showing the devastation by the tornado.

Courtney Burns's curator insight, September 18, 2013 8:29 AM

Seeing the damage done to all of these homes and communities is devastating. You see all the destruction in different areas on TV, but looking at it from a maps perspective is so much different. Seeing how it was and then looking at it after is unreal. The damage that is done to so much land is saddening. Then to look at the map of all the tornadoes since 1950 was eye opening. I never realized that there was so many tornadoes that occurred throughout the U.S since 1950. It was also shocking to see that there had been a huge tornado in the Boston area that took peoples lives. Usually when I think about tornadoes I don't think about them in Boston, Connecticut, or New York. 

Justin McCullough's curator insight, September 18, 2013 6:03 PM

The before and after images in this picture are insane. Living on the east coast it's hard to picture losing your home (your whole life) in a matter of mere seconds or minutes. It is really sad to see pictures such as these, and even more devastating to see the families affected by this with looks of disbelief. However, what is encouraging to see from tragedies such as these, is the community helping each other regardless of whatever background a person may have. Unfortunately it is moments like these that force people to help others without the thought of asking or seeking some sort of favor in return.  

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The Dubai Skyline In The Fog

The Dubai Skyline In The Fog | Geography News | Scoop.it

Now this is an amazing sight...no doubt where the main boulevard is. 


Via axelletess, Seth Dixon, megan b clement
Jacqueline Landry's insight:

This is pretty cool. You can tell how  high that main strip of buildings are. Very unique 

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megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 10:01 PM
Dubai a country that has developed itself. It is a country that is extremely rich and beautiful.
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Cultural Perspectives

Cultural Perspectives | Geography News | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Jacqueline Landry's insight:

when I look at this the first thought that comes to mind is it is easy for other people to judge. just by there comments they have no idea what the others beliefs are,. This is a classic judging a book by it's cover. The are both assuming it has to do with a male dominating world. I think it has to do with what you are comfortable with. 

more...
Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 21, 2013 3:52 PM

This cartoon reminds me of what a fascinating time we live in with the internet and streaming videos.  Just a few hundred years ago people thought dragons walked down the streets in china, now there are a handful of documentaries on the Chinese new year.  Wars have been fought using propaganda of us vs. them but now I could skype with a kid in Syria right now and find out what he thinks and has seen.  I hope as all of the world cultures acclimate to each other we adopt a live and let live mentality. 

Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 7:12 AM

This political cartoon is just another great example of how different cultures are across the globe. Here in America, we are told that the appropriate swimwear to wear to the beach only covers about a third of our body. Where as in the Middle East, wearing a burka is what they are told is the right type of clothing to wear. Whether it be for religious, cultural, or fashionable reasons, women wear all types of clothing and I don't believe it is directly due to male influence. There are many things that could cause this influence such as the church, family, or the media. Yet as the cartoon says, each woman thinks the men in that country are forcing them into wearing clothes like that and their culture is dominated by men. I guess it just shows the different perspectives each culture can have. 

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 9:51 PM
This cartoon depicts the cultural differences between two different cultures. On the right you have a woman in a traditional burka that covers all but her eyes. On the left you have a woman in a bikini which is what is apropriate to wear on the beach or to bed. Two totally different societies and beliefs and they both look at one another and see the other person as inapropriate. This is not the first time another country has looked at the USA and turned their nose up to something that we do differently.
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Pop culture in the Arab world

TED Talks At TEDGlobal University, Shereen El Feki shows how some Arab cultures are borrowing trademarks of Western pop culture -- music videos, comics, even Barbie -- and adding a culturally appropriate twist.

Via Seth Dixon
Jacqueline Landry's insight:

Religion plays a huge role in the Arab world and although times are changung they are trying to stay true to their culture. Sherren el feki says that meshing of civilization is important.  Taking popular culture and meshing it with culture will be successful. For instance the comic book 99, fitst Islam superhero. The 99 I to represent the 99 attributes. The 99 superheroes will hopefully join forces with Americas superman,etc. it is not meant to be a clash but to  mix the different cultures in both ancient in modern ways. 

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Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 11, 2013 8:59 PM

What type of diffusion is this? Also an example of ______________

Max Krishchuk's comment, April 30, 2013 6:44 AM
This is an interesting TED talk that centers on the integration of western culture with Arab culture. The Arab pop culture is very different from what I thought that it would be. It takes hard work to produce a culture that is modern yet still centers on Islamic foundation, but is seems like the Arab world has put in the work. The new culture is significant because that means that the people in the Arab world know what pop culture is and why it is important. The speaker says that the culture is a mesh of the old and new. She does not call it a mash or clash because there are certain parts that are being used from the West, such as superheroes and music videos, but the overall culture is centered on Islam. The people in the Middle East still learn about Islamic ideas and thought, but now get to learn about the subjects with superheroes. This is relevant in modern times and even in my life because as a Christian, I try to find movies, music, and entertainment that is different from the world. It is also hard for me to do so because there is a lot of nonsense out in the world that is portrayed as being normal.
Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 8:23 AM

I don't think popular culture and folk culture interact very well. They believe in completely different things and live different types of lives according to their values. The speaker means that the cultural interaction is intertwined together because of the islamic people who have borrowed cultural ideas from other ancient and modern civilizations and adapted it to their own. That's why it's meshed as a opposed to clashing or mash. For example, the music video channel that's like MTV. I think it's kind of funny how they made the people in that music video, that's from the USA, look like we also worship Allah. Also, the comic books show religious values in it, especially since the characters come from it. They want young people to not get sucked in to the outside world or modern culture from different societies, so instead they want to incorporate their religion with our ideas of culture.

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From Pets To Plates: Why More People Are Eating Guinea Pigs

From Pets To Plates: Why More People Are Eating Guinea Pigs | Geography News | Scoop.it
Guinea pigs are popular pets in the U.S., but in parts of South America, they're a delicacy. Some environmental and humanitarian groups are making a real push to encourage guinea pig farming as an eco-friendly alternative to beef.

Via Seth Dixon
Jacqueline Landry's insight:

I can  see both sides of this, I would never eat a guinea pig because I grew up viewing them as pets. I think people are brought up a certain way and even when they move they take their customs with them.  I have a friend from china and lived there until he was 14 yrs old, he  had told me the city he was from they ate dog and cats. they view it as meat were we think of them as pets. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 2, 2013 7:50 PM

First off, my apologies if you find the image distressing (I have two guinea pigs in my house and I will not be showing this picture to my children). However, the fact that many readers might find this image disturbing but wouldn't think twice about the sight of chicken grilling on the barbeque highlights the cultural taboos surrounding what we consider appropriate food sources.  The tradition has diffused to the United States as more South American immigrants have come to the United States.  While the meat is more environmentally sustainable (less resources are required to raise one pound of guinea pig meat than one pound of beef), many potential costumers are leery to eat something that they consider a pet.


Tags: food, diffusion, sustainability.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 28, 7:26 PM

This article is interesting because it is taking into consideration the ecological benefits of eating what we consider unorthodox meats. Raising guinea pigs for food would apparently leave a substantially smaller carbon footprint over a large, high waste producing animal like cows. Culturally, in South America guinea pigs are considered a delicacy, but I can't see culture changing in the United States to the point where we would give up hamburgers for grilled guinea pig.

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Ultra-Dense Housing

Ultra-Dense Housing | Geography News | Scoop.it
Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated areas in the world. Seven million people living in 423 square miles (1,096 sq km).

Via Seth Dixon
Jacqueline Landry's insight:

I understand that thiere is a high density population but having people live like this is unjust. It reminds me of a prison cell, I can't imagine more than one person living in this area. If places are becoming more and more pacaked, they shouldn't build places to fit more and more people like this. People still need there space.

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 2:55 PM

With Hong Kong being one of the most densely populated areas in the world, it is no surprise that living quarters are tight with not much space to move. In the photos shown, apartments were so small that they could only be photographed from the ceiling. There is no place to relax and residents are lucky to have whatever they can fit besides their beds. Families with children have to have bunk-beds in order to accommodate. 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2:57 PM

Wow, I cannot imagine living in these conditions. It looks smaller than a prison cell; only people pay to live there. These extreme living conditions are a result of over population in an area. It seems the city of Hong Kong is running out of places to build and house the abundance of people living there. It appears the average person in Hong Kong lives in these conditions due to the high price tags on larger apartments. This is a sad reality.   

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 8:06 AM

Living in such close quarters must be incredibly hard to do for those people who are new to Hong Kong and know something different. For Chinese residents, this is normal. Living in such small areas is a part of the Chinese daily life and culture. China is so population dense that this is the result of living there, tiny living spaces.

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Bootlegging in Tribal Pakistan

Bootlegging in Tribal Pakistan | Geography News | Scoop.it
In Pakistan's tribal areas, alcohol bootleggers, lured by enormous profits, have created clandestine delivery services to evade recent crackdowns by the Taliban and the police.

Via Seth Dixon
Jacqueline Landry's insight:

Bootlegging is more of a class status issue, the rich want it and they buy more liquor than the lower, middle class. there religion says it is a sin to drink and everyone listens. 

I think it is crazy that they think drinking is compared to adultery. I think because we live in a society were drinking is a norm, most gatherings involve some kind of alcohol, whether it be toasting to a special occasion or grabbing a drink to catch up with an old friend. 

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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 3:47 PM

Other than the actual product, there is no difference between these bootleggers and the illegal drug trade in the US. Even when they said that people that drink the alcohol get arrested, there is no difference. In the US we put heroin addicts in jail every day. Also, in the US the illegal drug trade is very lucrative, but also very dangerous.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 5:48 PM

Alcohol bootleggers have been getting shutdown by the police force. Without this service, the bootleggers would be out of business and probably in jail. This is like prohibition in the U.S. and those who sold alcohol were fined and also arrested. The same thing is happening here where the bootleggers are trying to make huge money by selling something thats outlawed.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, September 10, 11:36 AM

Interesting to see this happening in other areas of the world besides the United States during the times of prohibition.  If there is a will there is a way.

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Protest over Haiti slum eviction

Protest over Haiti slum eviction | Geography News | Scoop.it
Residents of hillside shanties above the Haitian capital Port-au-Prince protest against plans to clear their homes for a flood-protection project.

 

Even before the earthquake, Port-au-Prince was a city filled with slums.  The earthquake exacerbated so many of the urban, economic and environmental issues.  This eviction of the flood plains has class implications as the poor feel that they are being unfairly targeted in plans to improve the city. 


Via Seth Dixon
Jacqueline Landry's insight:

I did my research project on malnutrition in Haiti and couldn't help but feel bad for the people there. Yes before the earthquake they were suffering from hardships but the earthquake made it worse for them. Nature has an influence on the way we live, we depend, adapt and modify the environment all the time. But what happens when you can't depend  on it. Haiti's agriculture is shot, the soil is not sustainable to feed their population. The earthquake left families without homes and living in tents with no running Water. Very sad

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 4, 9:43 AM

Haitians are outraged as their homes in Port-au-Prince are being threatened to be evacuated. Port-au-Prince is home to many in the flood plains. These people cannot afford to move; this is the slums. This slum eviction does not affect the wealthy, because they live in the flood free areas. So is it fair to take away from the poor when they have nothing already?

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, February 6, 8:01 AM

It is hard to relate to this type of article in America.  Unlike third world countries, we do not allow this type of building to occur, but perhaps mobile homes in tornado alley might be a comparison.  The safety of the people in environmental disaster areas must be weighed against the ability of them to afford a home.  How to strike this balance is important and political.  Are their homes being unfairly targeted or are the better built homes simply safer and so they do not need to be moved?  This article is important because it outlines the problems in Haiti and other third world countries that don’t have strict building codes and shanty towns spring up.

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Gaming to Help Farmers

Gaming to Help Farmers | Geography News | Scoop.it
A computer game wants you to map the world's cropland so farmers can get more out of each harvest.

Via Seth Dixon
Jacqueline Landry's insight:

This is cool, there are many agricultural types and you can see It here. different land areas have different soil and chemicals in it which certain types of crops can benefit from. It is important to know these things. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 3, 2013 12:22 PM

NPR has recently highlighted Crop Capture; Crop Capture is a game that uses Google Earth imagery to crowd-source agricultural data.  From a pedagogical standpoint, this is a great way to visually introduce students the variety of agricultural landscapes that can be found around the world.  This is an example of what many refer to as citizen science games which provides an alternative rationale for playing the game.


Tags: agriculture, food production, mapping, geospatial, edtech.

PIRatE Lab's curator insight, December 4, 2013 4:30 PM

These types of approaches to crowd sourcing are becoming bigger and bigger by the day it seems.

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A Third Industrial Revolution

A Third Industrial Revolution | Geography News | Scoop.it
OUTSIDE THE SPRAWLING Frankfurt Messe, home of innumerable German trade fairs, stands the “Hammering Man”, a 21-metre kinetic statue that steadily raises and lowers its arm to bash a piece of metal with a...

 

This article argues that as manufacturing increasing becomes a digital production, more goods will be produced in the more developed countries.  If events unfold in this fashion, globalization and many other patterns with be significantly altered.  Would this make a better world?  For whom?    


Via Seth Dixon
Jacqueline Landry's insight:

manufacturing is becoming more and more machines rather than humans, this leaves people without jobs to support their families. It is cheaper to have a machine run the production line rather than a person. This also helps the amount of production that is completed, machines go a bit faster. But I think not every job should be a machine, there is always faulty machines but there isn't anything better than a human with common sense. 

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 27, 2013 6:54 AM

Seems to be that this might lead to further job loss by qualified individuals as machines are desigining and building machines and also with the advent of 3-D printing anyone at home can build a hammer as said in the article.  Also take a look at http://defdist.org/ now you can make your own 3-d gun.  Im not against gun ownership, but this opens the gate to too many people in my opinion.

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Rethinking Agriculture

"Growing Power is a national nonprofit organization and land trust supporting people from diverse backgrounds, and the environments in which they live, by helping to provide equal access to healthy, high-quality, safe and affordable food for people in all communities."


Via Seth Dixon
Jacqueline Landry's insight:

For the past three years I have had the luxury of having a garden in my backyard, it is a lot of work but there is nothing better than knowing where my food is coming from. I enjoy going in my backyard and being able to grab vegetables whenever I need them. I also go to farmers markets for vegetables that I don't grow in my own garden.  I would defeniately support local people to get good quality food. 

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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 9:19 PM

I think it is very important for people to have access to fresh healthy foods if its desired. Living in cities can cause this to not happen as much due to location. More of the fresh foods are produced outside of cities in rural areas. By growing plants in this green room in a city it gives people access to fresh foods. 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 2:56 AM

with the increasing numbers of urban citizens in years to come the key to success in the city will be its ability to adapted to its growing enviroment. It would be nearly impossible for cities to exsit in the future with the current ways of agriculuture, there needs to be a change in the way things are done. Thats why this next gen way of agriculuture is going to take off in urban areas. with the ability to have full farms on rooftops the city will be able to self sustain itself more properly than it does in current times.

Lauren Shigemasa's curator insight, January 22, 10:28 PM

a powerful way to increase access to healthy foods! this organization called Growing Power is using urban gardening not only to create a sustainable food source for its neighbors, but also provides a system so we can donate and send a week's worth of fresh fruit/vegetables to any surrounding community in need. so amazing!

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Devolution: A Beginner's Guide

Devolution: A Beginner's Guide | Geography News | Scoop.it
What is devolution and how has it changed how Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales are governed?

 

This article with videos, charts and images was designed as a primer for UK voters for the 2010 election to understand who devolution in Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland were reshaping the political landscape in the United Kingdom.  It is general enough that even though it is outdated as a news story, it serves as a concrete example from geography students to understand the processes and reasons for a decentralization of political power.


Via Seth Dixon
Jacqueline Landry's insight:

This shift can reshape the countries in many ways, financially, and the over all quality of life. A place will do better with connections than standing alone. This may help with international relation issues and build new relationships. When places depend on one another it can reshape the Country. It can also help with investment and jobs. 

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Don Brown Jr's comment, July 16, 2012 6:34 PM
What does local autonomy based on national identity mean for the English in terms of power and who or what region(s) will truly benefit from the continuation of this policy in the UK.? Is it possible that England is not pushing for their own separate form of representation because they already feel “unofficially” represented by the UK government and is it this feeling that is fueling the actions of Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland?
chris tobin's curator insight, March 22, 2013 1:23 PM

Here is an article March 2013 updating the latest in Wales

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-politics-21683771

 

"Silk Commission:  Mixed Reaction Over Devolution Power" 3/16/2013 BBC

 

     Since 1997 there have been many changes in the devolution processes Westminster still holds the most governing decisions but it seems that the UK taxpayers do not want their money to go to other countries for public services. 

Railing is a big issue since there have been alot of plans for improving infrastructure in transportation to build up the economy.  This will be particularly interesting to follow in the news.

     Liberal Democrat Leader Kirsty Williams stated a need for a new model of devolution  with clear definitions and the Conservative Lib. Dem. coalition's 114 page document to the Silk Commission states policing, broadcasting, and energy projects should remain under Westminster but to devolve teachers pay and rail franchises.

 

 

 

    

    

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, October 6, 2013 6:51 PM

The devolution of the United Kingdom is taking place at a legistlative level right now- if/when will Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland vote to actually secede? The article made mention that people in Britain are starting to get angry that they are subsidizing programs in Scotland that the English pay for themselves. What are the benefits to being a part of the United Kingdom? What's the best balance of power for all involved?

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Recycling Awareness Campaign


Via Seth Dixon
Jacqueline Landry's insight:

I have to confess that I probably wouldn't pick up a bottle in a public place because I would be worried with germs. I most definately would at work or somewhere I was fimilar with or had a sink available to wash my hands. I probably sound like a germ nut but you never know. I think when people are fimilar with an area or care about the appearance of a place they are more likely to pick it up. I did appreciate the cheers after the lady picked it up. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 31, 2013 10:18 AM

I've posted on this topic now, so regular readers will know that I love a good flashmob that changes our perception of public places.  This flashmob from Quebec makes me wonder, "if there were a bottle on the ground, would I pick it up and recycle it?"  I'd like to think that I would, but the numbers show that most people would just walk right on by.  For more of my favorite flashmobs in public places, see http://geographyeducation.org/whats-new/articles/place-and-flash-mobs/  

Trisha Klancar's curator insight, August 21, 2013 7:07 AM

I love this...We are in Quebec City..this is in Montreal but it is the same. Very little recycling is done...people in homes do it then in the news we hear how it sits outside and rots, rusts or is wasted as the recylcing plant can not handle the amount it receives.This fact causes people to be upset and then to junk what they have.

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2 Cars Swallowed By Sinkhole

2 Cars Swallowed By Sinkhole | Geography News | Scoop.it
A 150-yard-long chunk of State Highway 89 collapsed about 5 a.m. roughly 25 miles south of Page

Via Seth Dixon
Jacqueline Landry's insight:

I am curious to see what the geologists reasoning for this to happen.  when I drive I assuming the roads I take are safe but this goes to show you you never know what will happen. And the news reporter said it was still going down. Glad everyone involved made it out safe. 

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chris tobin's comment, February 21, 2013 10:12 AM
Located on the cliffs, surprisingly there were no landslides
Louis Culotta's comment, February 21, 2013 11:49 AM
it looks like some of the pictures of the roads I took after the earthquake in new Zealand .
megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 9:28 PM
A 150 yard piece of highway 89 had collapsed at 5 am. Two cars were traveling on the highway at the time. They have called scientists and geologists to the site where it happened so they can explain exactly what happened. The video is crazy of the road collapsed it literally dropped about six+ feet.
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The limits of freedom for educated girls in Malala's Pakistan

The limits of freedom for educated girls in Malala's Pakistan | Geography News | Scoop.it
In a country this battered, fractured, dysfunctional – how much can she really hope to achieve?

 

The issue of female education in Pakistan has exploded after Malala Yousafzai was attacked by the Taliban for publicly advocating for girls to receive more schooling.  This attack has lead several media outlets to take a more serious look at the gendered cultural and economic opportunities (or lack thereof) for girls within Pakistan.  This NPR podcast also speaks of the real options in front of so many girls like Malala and the cultural and political contexts within which they navigate their lives.

 

Tags: gender, South Asia, podcast, culture, Islam, development, unit 3 culture, education.


Via Seth Dixon
Jacqueline Landry's insight:

These girls are being deprived an education because they are females- crazy. And when Malala was trying to make change she was gunned down on the school bus, in front of other kids. I feel sorry for those children, they are the future, why not have them all educated.  I couldn't imagine leaving in a society that my future would be limited. 

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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 6:09 PM

I really love this article because the young girl being interviewed is angry and has had enough of the sexism in Pakistan. Malala Yousafzai has definitely become a role model for girls in her homeland and she has advanced girl's education by a large margin during her fight. The school systems in Pakistan are lacking because of the environments and the materials teachers focus on and Pakistani boys get a very different education in their religious schools but the girls have begun to work harder to equal up to them and make it to universities.  There are still many restrictions on the jobs women can take but girls are beginning to fight that too.  Pakistan has now had female political officials which has shown the generations of schoolgirls that they can truly do anything they set their minds too and Malala has helped prove that the movement can't be stopped by surviving her assassination attempt and continuing to campaign. 

Daishon Redden's curator insight, April 22, 7:00 AM

I chose this article because it talks about limit of freedom in LDC's and how girls are not allowed to get an education. This was the main idea of what Half The Sky was. Girls no being given the same rights as boy.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 10:40 AM

Starting this article response off with a quote seems only appropriate. This article follows Malala Yousafzai through her horrific experience being victimized by the Talaiban. She is an inspiring girl with all the set backs she has had to endure and she wants the right for an education for Women in her country and society. She is determined in order to create a better life for herself and her people. “The peasants had a very difficult situation, but they didn’t give up,” Aroosa says in English. “They fought back, and got power. Girls can fight back and can get an education. A girl can bring a big change.”

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A Glossary of Southern Expressions

A Glossary of Southern Expressions | Geography News | Scoop.it
The Ultimate Language Resource on the Web.

Via Seth Dixon
Jacqueline Landry's insight:

I took the quiz that was in here and was surprised with some of the answers. I am a waitress and I get all the time that I sound like I have a new York or New Jersey accent. I found it funny that I have never been to those states before. It was cool to see this. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 12, 2013 12:42 PM

Having never lived in the South, I will defer to others on accuracy and quality of this dictionary and sayings, although I have heard this one enough understand this entry:

Fixin v. aux. Getting ready to: "I'm fixin to leave."


Tags: language, culture, unit 3 culture, USA.

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, July 23, 2013 12:33 PM

Language

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Why these Somali refugees do not want to leave Kenya

Why these Somali refugees do not want to leave Kenya | Geography News | Scoop.it

"For millions of refugees across Africa life is a daily struggle.  Many dream of one day returning to their homeland while others have spent decades building a new life.  On World Refugee Day, BBC Focus on Africa's Anne Soy visits a Somali family in Nairobi, Kenya, who cannot imagine returning to their roots."


Via Seth Dixon
Jacqueline Landry's insight:

I don't believe its a refugee's duty to return to their country. I think after some time people start their lives over, for a reason. Most refugees leave their country because it is so bad. This family in the video went to another country and he was there for almost twenty years, that is a long time.  when your in a place for that long going back would mean starting over again. 

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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:19 PM

I do not feel that Is the duty of refuge to return to their home if they don’t want to, even if is safe. If I were a refuge I would learn about the present situation of my home, if is safe or not or I would take in consideration, where would my family and I have a better future; like school, work and if I can practice my beliefs without any fear of being arrested or worst kill.   

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 2:04 PM

No matter where you grow up, you form roots to your native land. Times are tough across the globe, especially for those living in Africa. While families plant their roots and look for ways to make things better, sometimes the best way is to leave. What makes people stay when their hometown roots are at rock bottom?

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 12:59 PM

Some people want to stay close to their heritage and native land. Others have no interest in their homelands and want to get away fast. This family doesn't know anything besides being refugees and they want to stay and build their lives there.

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Housing Patterns

Housing Patterns | Geography News | Scoop.it
See the big picture of how suburban developments are changing the country's landscape, with aerial photos and ideas for the future

Via Seth Dixon
Jacqueline Landry's insight:

Having the streets interconnected allows for easy  traveling throughout the area.  when there is more density in an area it means there are more houses , more people.  The sprawl has the center on the place and the streets go out around it. The way the streets are made are for different reasons,.

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Chris Scott's curator insight, August 6, 2013 3:31 AM

It is cool to see how each neighborhood has a different housing pattern depending on the area in which they live.You could almost say that it is like a quilt with all its different patterns.

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 10, 2013 1:13 PM

A very interesting article on changes in landscape, while looking though this I came aross so many little things i never noticed about the topical layout of housing. The main thing that is apparent is density, how closely each house is put together, the amount of land each has as well as the view from the property. Its aslo interesting to see how the design of the area can be made for easy access or be desigend to keep people out with only one enctancte and exit. All of these charasticts make up how the land is desired as well as econimcly priced, which then determins who will be able to live there.

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 9:57 PM
This article talks about twenty different housing patterns and how we base these housing patterns around our society or enviroment. How looking at housing patterns can tell you what kind of neighborhood one lives in from the sky. Looking down and seeing a golf course with lush grass and big backyards shows you that this neighborhood is very expensive. Or Canal houses that utilize every inch of the waters edge to financially make them able to charge higher prices for the homes because each house has a water view and is on the waters edge.
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Currywurst on the Street

Currywurst on the Street | Geography News | Scoop.it
Michael Slackman, The Times's Berlin Bureau Chief, looks into the city's obsession with a popular street dish that combines sausage, ketchup and curry powder.

Via Seth Dixon
Jacqueline Landry's insight:

This is a stride of different cultures,  a little ancient and modern culture. When the Turkish immigrant came over to Germany because they needed workers (Germans stopped having so many kids) it help form the curry wurst. They also use American ketchup because Americans were over there for the war and they ate this too. The curry powder came way of United Kingdom. Basically the population learned from all these cultures and  created one huge hit. 

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megan b clement's curator insight, October 12, 2013 9:23 PM

" Currywurst is a great example of globalization and how different cultures  and customs have made their way across the globe to other countries. They continue with their traditional customs but allow other cultures to migrate their way and blend with others. In this article the currywurst is a blend of Germany, The USA, and India by way of the UK. THe sauage is the German aspect, the ketchup is the USA, and curry is India's tradition,"

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 1, 2013 10:13 AM

I found this video to be very interesting. The video talks about Berlin's signature dish the currywurst. Currywurst is one of most well known dishes in Berlin, and is a dish the natives say every tourist should try. What was interesting to find was that the dish had elements from a few different places. Currywurst is made of pork sausage which and fried and cut into pieces. Pork suasage is a very widely used and popular meat that have in germany. However on the curry worst dish they put ketchup, which is very american like. They also sprinkle it with curry, which comes by way of India from Great Britian. It is amazing ti me that a country's signature dish has ingredients from two other countries! You would think that a signature dish would be made entirely of ingredients from their homeland. However the country is becoming more and more like other country adding sushi bars, soup kitchens, fast food, and etc. It just goes to show how much things have changed. Before country's were trying to use their own products as much as possible. Now we have such good transportation systems that people are moving to new places and food is being transported all over the world. Now we are at a point where even a country's signature dish uses products from many different country's. We have almost completely eliminated folk culture. It is almost sad in a way. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 9:03 AM

All over Germany specially in Berlin you can find many varieties of foods and restaurants that were influenced by many countries all over the world. A very popular dish the currywurst is fried German sausage with American ketchup and India curry powder. This dish was influenced by two other countries and was opular during WWII. The dish is still very popular today because of its unique taste.