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What is the oldest city in the world?

What is the oldest city in the world? | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
 Mark Twain declared that the Indian city of Varanasi was older than history, tradition and legend. He was, of course, wrong. So which exactly is the world’s most ancient continuously inhabited city?

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Cass Allan's curator insight, March 1, 2015 2:17 AM

differences of opinion about how to classify city age

 

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 15, 2015 7:58 PM

Since the beginning of civilization, rivers have been communities' main job source. Even before B.C., the only one way to survive was to construct houses close to the nearest body of water. In the case of Crocodile City near the Nile river in Africa,the city was built close to the river due to the fertile soil and water supplied by the Nile. This enabled ancient civilizations to survive. Unfortunately, due to religious conflict between communities, some of these original civilizations were forced to relocate. Another reason for relocation is due to the movement of the bodies of water. As the paths of the rivers change, communities are forced to abandon their homes and start new civilizations so to remain close to the waters. All these communities around the river Nile relied on agriculture for its wealth and power. All these cities are examples of civilizations that have inhabited areas near rivers for centuries, even before B.C. Given their habitat, rivers will provide the necessar resources and tools for current and future generations to be able to survive.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 22, 2015 2:55 PM

Although the question is misleading, it should say what is the oldest continuously inhabited city in the world, I enjoyed the article as once again I learned quite a bit about ancient history. Seems Aleppo, Syria is the apparent winner. They have dated the city to 6000 BC and nomads were there 5000 years before that. Shows the importance of trade as most of the contenders were on a trade route near a body of water. In fact, the article says that Aleppo was very much involved in trade until the opening of the Suez canal. Let's hope that with all the turmoil in Syria that Aleppo continues to thrive for centuries to come. Constantinople and Damascus were serious contenders but could not show continuous habitation. Aleppo according to the article, was a strong contender for commerce alongside Cairo, Egypt. Another contender, Jericho, dates back to 9000 BC but again was not continually inhabited and thus cannot lay claim to the world's oldest city.

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Sao Paulo water crisis adds to Brazil business woes

Sao Paulo water crisis adds to Brazil business woes | Geography is my World | Scoop.it

Water scarcity adn economic growth....

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Water scarcity and economic consequences....

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China's 'eco-cities': empty of hospitals, shopping centres and people

China's 'eco-cities': empty of hospitals, shopping centres and people | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
China's urbanisation plan will move another 100 million people into cities by 2020 – but in Tianjin Eco-city, many green buildings still lie empty and there are no hospitals or shopping malls
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This is what the world looks like if you scale countries by population

Bye, bye Canada hello super-gigantic India.
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Great visualisation.

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Graphs at a glance: Impact of occupation, unemployment, and geography on death rates in Britain ~ Ripped-off Britons

Graphs at a glance: Impact of occupation, unemployment, and geography on death rates in Britain ~ Ripped-off Britons | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
RT @RippedOffBriton: Graphs at a glance: Impact of occupation, unemployment, and geography on death rates in Britain- http://t.co/7AbY1pnssk
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11 Signs Your Hood Is Being Gentrified

11 Signs Your Hood Is Being Gentrified | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
A Washington, D.C., resident describes the changes and privilege that have moved into her longtime neighborhood.

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Emily Bian's curator insight, March 22, 2015 8:48 PM

7) Uneven development, zones of abandonment, disamenity, and gentrification

This article was written by a woman who noticed a lot of changes in Washington D.C. Gentrification led to these many changes, by becoming not as unique and urbanizing at other people's expense. She describes gentrification as remodeling very quickly and ferociously. A lot of the things she says are for the general good of the people, like installing street lights, but don't take into consideration the people who don't appreciate the changes. Stores like walmart are taking over the family owned stores, and more people are moving in. 

This article describes gentrification perfectly, and I like her pictures to go along with it. I think this would help introduce this vocab term to new students. 

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 24, 2015 12:29 AM

Sadly, gentrification happens all across the world. Poor populations in cities are disadvantaged and often have to move out due to wealthier populations moving in. One of the signs I found most disturbing was that police will start patrolling the areas where wealthier and poorer populations mix. This is a sad reality. Police do this to ensure that crime rates are low as poor people would be more tempted to commit crimes in wealthier neighborhoods. I do think this police patrolling has racist roots since the poorer population in Washington D.C. is mostly black. Words like "renewal" and "redevelopment" hide the sad reality behind gentrification/

Ricardo Cabeza de Vaca's curator insight, May 25, 2015 9:36 PM

I believe this article is very interesting because it shows how gentrification can change a neighborhood. I believe gentrification is a little bit of a negative thing because it adds geographical uniformity to our modern society and yes that could be good thing in measure. The article states now police patrol every street, Walmart's and 7-11's start showing up, areas will start becoming more aesthetically pleasing, but is that really a good thing? I believe that sometimes while you are driving by it is better to have a change in your surrounding, rather than seeing the same thing over and over again even if it is more modern.

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Inside China's 'scrap village'

Inside China's 'scrap village' | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
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Recycling on a grand scale - implications for disparities of wealth in China

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▶ Three little words: Country, Nation, State - YouTube

Richard Campanaro - Department of International Relations, London School of Economics and Political Science. How to think about what you read, hear, and see ...
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Country, Nation, State - same thing? Not really....

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The changing shape of world demographics

Animating the changing shape of the world population pyramid. For more multimedia content from The Economist visit our website: http://econ.st/1xqEZhX.


Via Seth Dixon
Scott Langston's insight:

Great resource for looking at Population Pyramids

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Bex Swaney's curator insight, December 5, 2014 12:27 PM

Growth of the ageing population, population change as a whole

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 10:47 AM

unit 2

Deanna Metz's curator insight, March 1, 8:05 PM

This is an incredibly powerful and remarkably well-done video by the Economist (see related article here) that is reminiscent of a TED-ED lesson on the importance and value of population pyramids.  This video goes nicely with this article from the World Bank entitled "The End of the Population Pyramid" which highlights the demographic changes that will be reshaping global demographics in the next 50-100 years.  


Tag: population, declining population, demographic transition model, video, APHG.

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Half of China's top 10 rivers polluted: report - China.org.cn

Half of China's top 10 rivers polluted: report - China.org.cn | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
The water in half of China's top 10 river systems is polluted, and about 60 percent of the nation's underground water is of poor quality.
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BREAKING: The US and China just announced a huge deal on climate—and it's a gamechanger

BREAKING: The US and China just announced a huge deal on climate—and it's a gamechanger | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
The surprise agreement aims to double the pace of carbon pollution reduction in the US.
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Eerie Landforms

Eerie Landforms | Geography is my World | Scoop.it

Utah's Fantasy Canyon features mudstone eroded into bizarre shapes. This one's called "Flying Witch". #Halloween

 

Tags: physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms, Utah.


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McDonald's International

McDonald's International | Geography is my World | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Scott Langston's insight:
GLOBALISATION AND Macck
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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:45 PM

We talk about McDonalds as a way of Americanizing the rest of the world. These foods show that it may still be the case but local culture is still infused and desired where McDonalds expands to.

Payton Sidney Dinwiddie 's curator insight, January 21, 2015 9:40 PM

This shows that mmcdonals is a global industy . there are many mcdonalds everywhere they put a spin oncertain diishes to match their heritage like in japan instead of hamburger meat like we americans use the use crabs.It just really shows how far mcdonalds was changed from just starting in america to being featured all over the globe

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 22, 2015 7:06 PM

I've lived and traveled to a few places especially Asia.  I've had the Ramen at McD's in Hawaii along with the Portugeuse sausage that comes with the big breakfast.  I've also experienced Japanese McD's.  It was nice to be able to find some of the regular food like a burger and fry at any McD's in the world, but I never ordered anything else. 

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Evolution of the World Map

Evolution of the World Map | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
Use our interactive In Charted Waters tool which shows information & visuals on how our knowledge of the world map has evolved.

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How the World’s Biggest Mall Became a Chinese ‘Ghost Town’ | TIME.com

How the World’s Biggest Mall Became a Chinese ‘Ghost Town’ | TIME.com | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
Dongguan, China, is a factory town with an estimated population of 10 million, many of whom are migrant workers from other parts of the country. But even a community that large, it seems, is unable to support a 5 million-sq.-ft. shopping center. More than twice the size of the U.S.
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The Insane Plan to Build the World's Tallest Towers in a Lake in China

The Insane Plan to Build the World's Tallest Towers in a Lake in China | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
These days, ambitious new skyscrapers are blanketed in a cloud of "green" buzzwords. Wind turbines! Hydrogen fuel cells! Insect farms! (Yes, insect farms.) Then there's Phoenix Towers, which has all of the above and more and looks like this. Let's call it what it is: a greenwashed dick-measuring contest.
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China's 'shock and awe' urbanisation plans....

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Why we need the UN's sustainable development goals - Agenda - The World Economic Forum

Why we need the UN's sustainable development goals - Agenda - The World Economic Forum | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
Sustainable development encompasses prosperity, social inclusion, sustainability and good governance. It is the challenge of our time, says Jeffrey Sachs.
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David Attenborough: Leaders are in denial about climate change

David Attenborough: Leaders are in denial about climate change | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
Sir David Attenborough is calling on global leaders to step-up their actions to curb climate change, saying that they are in denial about the dangers it poses despite the overwhelming evidence about its risks.
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Fogo volcano activity report – 3 new videos you certainly will love incl. extreme Close-Up

Fogo volcano activity report – 3 new videos you certainly will love incl. extreme Close-Up | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
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Some very cool footage here

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Africa, Uncolonized: A Detailed Look at an Alternate Continent

Africa, Uncolonized: A Detailed Look at an Alternate Continent | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
What if the Black Plague had killed off almost all Europeans? Then the Reconquista never happens. Spain and Portugal don't kickstart Europe's colonization of other continents. And this is what Africa might have looked like.

 

Tags: Africa, colonialism, borders, historical, map.


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Bob Beaven's curator insight, March 26, 2015 2:26 PM

An interesting fact for a geographer/historian to look at is how different events happening in history can affect a map.  This is very fascinating, because Africa or should I say Alkebu-Lan has very strong looking kingdoms without the Influence of Europe.  Another interesting element of the map is how it is not Euro-centric, Africa is shown as the top of the world.  I guess in this history, Northern Europe instead of being a powerhouse of the world, would be classified as the dark region (like the Congo was in our own world).  It is also interesting how the map is not Euro-centric, but the fact to keep in mind there is the old saying, history is written by the winner.  In this case, the map of the world was drawn by the winning Europeans as well, and this map completely reverses that.  Another interesting fact, is that the Iberian is part of an Islamic Empire.  It looks, as if in this history, Portugal was overcome by the "Arabes" and Spain never even attempted to launch the Reconquista.  History and Geography, especially Political Geography are very closely linked with one another.  

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 27, 2015 5:00 PM

I found this particularly interesting to read about, as alternative histories fascinate me. The "what if" questions that historians always ask themselves are fun to examine and illustrate, as they are shown in the alternative map of Africa. It's interesting to see just how different this map- drawn from historical accounts of ethnic and linguistic differences between the various African societies- is from the map of Africa we now have today. European colonizers drew borders without any consideration for the native populace, and that is today reflected in the rigid borders of African states that do not match historical ethnic boundaries. The concept of a Europe unable to recover from the Black Death would have serious repercussions for world history. It would allow for the progression of African economies and polities unmolested by European influences and the slave trade, completely reshaping the course of the continent's history. The increased influence of the Arab world would also be a plausible consequence of the decimation of Europe's population. This is an interesting concept, and it is very informative in the sense that it forces us to consider a multitude of factors that played a role in shaping the world as we see and live it today.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 30, 2015 7:04 AM

Alternative history is always fun. There is no question that Africa would be a different place today, if Europeans had never step foot on the shores of this great continent. Would the great African empires still be alive today? Would Africa be the dominant continent in world affairs? The history of civilization over the past 500 years would almost certainly be radically different. Instead of a Eurocentric world, we may have had an Afrocentric world. What this map really underscores, is the effect that colonialism had on Africa. The Africa we know today is a consequence of that era of European domination. While alternate history is fun, we must always remember the actual history that has occurred in Africa.

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Here's what 9,000 years of breeding has done to corn, peaches, and other crops

Here's what 9,000 years of breeding has done to corn, peaches, and other crops | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
Corn, watermelon, and peaches were unrecognizable 8,000 years ago.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 28, 2014 1:25 PM

I think the term 'artificial' in the image might be misleading and it depends on your definition of the word.  Humans have been selectively breed plants and animals for as long as we've been able to domestic them; that is a 'natural' part of our cultural ecology and has lead to great varieties of crops that are much more suitable for human consumption than what was naturally available.  Long before climate change, humans have been actively shaping their environment and the ecological inputs in the systems with the technology that their disposal.  This is a good resource to teach about the 1st agricultural revolution.     


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, unit 5 agriculture.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, March 22, 2015 9:39 PM

This article shows how crops were entirely different 8,000 years ago. It shows how much we have breeded and affected the natural crops. With the example of peaches, watermelons, and corn, the article shows how the natural crop didn't taste as good and was a lot smaller. The natural peach had 64% edible food; whereas the 2014 peach had 90% edible food. The pictures comparing the natural and artificial crops also illustrated how the many varieties of that specific crop had grown and where the crop is found has grown. Lastly, the diagrams compares the water and sugar percentages. This article paints a good picture as to how much mankind has affected our land and agriculture. Also, how much our crops have changed due to selective breeding.

 

The article gives a good illustration of topics in Unit 5: Agriculture, Food Production, and Rural Land Use. The article shows how selective breeding has affected many crops. It gives a good view as to how selective breeding and agriculture has been affected and changed in the Neolithic Agriculture Revolution. The article explains what what life was like and how it changed in the Neolithic times. This article is really interesting in showing how crops were changed.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:41 PM

I think the term 'artificial' in the image might be misleading and it depends on your definition of the word.  Humans have been selectively breed plants and animals for as long as we've been able to domestic them; that is a 'natural' part of our cultural ecology and has lead to great varieties of crops that are much more suitable for human consumption than what was naturally available.  Long before climate change, humans have been actively shaping their environment and the ecological inputs in the systems with the technology that their disposal.  This is a good resource to teach about the 1st agricultural revolution.     

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, unit 5 agriculture.

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The largest city in Brazil is running dangerously low on water

The largest city in Brazil is running dangerously low on water | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
Thanks to the worst drought in eight decades, millions of people in São Paulo are facing water outages.


Tags: Brazil, urban, water, urban ecology, climate change, environment depend, sustainability, agriculture, food production.


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Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 25, 2014 12:49 PM

Brazil’s largest city, Sao Paulo, which provides one third of the countries GPD, is now running low or water due to one of the worst droughts in 8 years. There are more than 21 million people in this city and 13 million of them are facing water outages. If it doesn't rain soon, the city could face a collapse. The city has blamed the drought of lack of water in the vapor clouds that the amazon usually provides to the city. They also blame it on deforestation and global warming. President Dilma Rousseff has questioned the cities misusage of their water supply, claiming that the city mismanaged their water supply.  

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 23, 2015 10:16 AM

This shows just how important water is the human race. It also shows how humans have no sense of urgency in conserving water until it's too late. The saying "you never know a good thing until it's gone" applies in this case. The Brazilian government did not take any sufficient measures to conserve water until it realized how depleted the reservoir is. This event demonstrates the environmental impact of  water depletion on humans, and how humans have such a huge impact on the geographical landscape on Earth. As seen in the picture above, many greens turned yellow as a result of the lowering water levels. The river beds are soon going to be overgrown by shrubbery as water no longer exists there. These are all results of a combination of natural (lack of rain) and human causes of resource depletion.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 30, 2015 7:19 AM

water

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The World Is Becoming A Better Place

The World Is Becoming A Better Place | Geography is my World | Scoop.it

"People who love to complain about how horrible everything is also love to point out that the world is always changing — and change is of course always horrible, because it destroys the way things used to be. It's easy to get depressed by all the 'everything is horrible' talk.  So it's nice to sometimes remind ourselves that some things — many things, in fact — are getting better all the time."


Via Seth Dixon
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A positive spin on some of the plusses of globalisation

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Beth Marinucci's curator insight, November 12, 2014 5:49 AM

Some good news . . .

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 19, 2014 5:10 PM

It is easy to talk about all the things that are wrong with the world today. It is a nice change in pace posting about something good going on in the world for once. Covering all regions of the world, this article is about how the world is becoming a better place. Thank god. Looking at the annual death because of battle, it is clear to see that the world is in fact, getting better. There are less deaths, which in turn also mean that there are less battles going on in the world. Poverty rate has also gone way down in the past couple of years. Even though there is still a huge amount of poverty, it has been getting better throughout the years. Another chart presented along with many other, was the life expectancy rate going through the roof. The best example is China, having their life expectancy at age 30 in the 1960's to age 75 now. There is still much room for improvement in the world such as disease, poverty, and climate changes, but this article makes me worry a little less about our world today.   

Aleena Reyes's curator insight, January 22, 2015 6:50 PM

This is something I knew to be true but felt distant towards because outlets like American news sources are always focused on the bad. Why is that? It seems American to be fearful and instill fear.

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The Berlin Wall fell 25 years ago, but Germany is still divided

The Berlin Wall fell 25 years ago, but Germany is still divided | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
Stunning satellite images and maps show how east and west differ from each other even today.

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Peter Phillips's curator insight, November 6, 2014 11:43 AM

50 years of communist rule still affect opportunities in Germany today, as these maps show. What they don't show is the social mirror that each provides to the other and the rich discussions about social policy that result. Reunification has been an expensive exercise for Germany, however one that it is committed to.

Jacob Conklin's curator insight, February 12, 2015 6:20 PM

The Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, but its influence is still present in today's Germany. History plays a key role in the shaping of political boundaries and that history is clearly evident in Germany. The line where the Berlin wall once stood still divides the country economically. The western part of Germany is far more economically affluent than the east. The USSR may be gone, but its influence still remains. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:14 AM

These two maps (unemployment on the left and disposable income on the right) are but two examples in this article that highlights the lingering distinctions between the two parts of Germany that were reunited 25 years ago.  The social geographies imposed by the Iron Curtain and the Berlin  Wall are still being felt from this relic border and will for years to come. 


Tags: Germany, industry, labor, economic, historical, political, borders.