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American Cities Can Now Be Divided Into 4 Different Categories, Depending On ... - Business Insider

American Cities Can Now Be Divided Into 4 Different Categories, Depending On ... - Business Insider | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
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Geography is my World
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Female Genital Mutilation - "Mums come begging us to do it"

A woman who performs FGM procedures in Egypt - three a week despite it being banned - talks to the BBC's Orla Guerin.
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World’s Largest Dam Removal Unleashes U.S. River After Century of Electric Production

World’s Largest Dam Removal Unleashes U.S. River After Century of Electric Production | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
The last section of dam is being blasted from the Elwha River on Washington's Olympic Peninsula on Tuesday.

 

For almost half a century, the two dams were widely applauded for powering the growth of the peninsula and its primary industry. But the dams blocked salmon migration up the Elwha, devastating its fish and shellfish—and the livelihood of the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe. As the tribe slowly gained political power—it won federal recognition in 1968—it and other tribes began to protest the loss of the fishing rights promised to them by federal treaty in the mid-1800s. In 1979, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Washington tribes, including the Elwha Klallam, were entitled to half the salmon catch in the state.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 9, 1:16 PM

See also this video to see the rapid changes on the nearby White Salmon River when they removed the dam. 


Tags: biogeography, environment, land use, sustainability, environment adapt.

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The Political Geography of Hong Kong's Protests

The Political Geography of Hong Kong's Protests | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
The territory's residents are demanding democracy in city intersections, not central squares.

 

The significance of the protests, which have brought tens of thousands into the streets, lies not only in what protesters are demanding but also in where they're demanding it—and where they're not. Consider that pro-democracy demonstrations in Hong Kong typically happen in Victoria Park, which is about two and a half miles from Central District and which hosts the annual June 4 candlelight vigil commemorating the 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown in Beijing. This time around, however, few police or protesters have ventured there.

The unpredictable, spontaneous geography of the protests is important precisely because it transcends the status quo. It is a testament to how serious these demonstrations are that they refuse to be contained.

Tags: political, conflict, governance, China, East Asia.


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 6, 3:26 PM

The relative location of these protests are what is important in the OCLP movement. The protest are no longer contained to the Victoria Park, the are popping up in intersections and seriously disrupting the status quo of every day life in Hong Kong. The geography of these protest illustrate how different and important the OCLP movement may be. This movement shows how geography can help explain social movements. Because the OCLP movement is popping up in areas where no other protest have occurred, it is hinting to the possible large scale influence the movement might have.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 7, 10:02 AM

The increased visibility of the internet and globalization has made large scale demonstration not only a good way to show civil discontent but the preferred method of increasing awareness of an issues across the world. Because Hong Kong is such an integrated part of global economy, they can stage these massive protests without too much fear of violent police reaction, as the world will be quick to condemn such action as soon as it happens. While the protests started as a student movement, it has now spread throughout the city and both younger and older people, students and professionals, have begun to participate. This popular participation shows how serious these issues are to the people of Hong Kong.

Chandler and Zane's curator insight, October 16, 4:44 PM

Political: There have been lots of protest lately in China. Chief executive CY Leung announced that he is planning to shut down Hong Kong's  central district. People are not happy with this and the protest are becoming very big for this little island. 

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Where Has All the Water Gone?

Where Has All the Water Gone? | Geography is my World | Scoop.it

"Once the fourth-largest lake in the world, Central Asia's shrinking Aral Sea has reached a new low, thanks to decades-old water diversions and a more recent drought." 


Via Seth Dixon
Scott Langston's insight:

Water Scarcity

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Edelin Espino's curator insight, October 10, 2:47 PM

The Aral Sea is drying. This was one of the four largest lakes in the world. A saltwater lake and now the water is evaporating and is getting even saltier because as the water evaporates into the atmosphere and minerals like salt left on the surface the remaining water is saltier. Something could be causing the water to dry but even if they know what is causing it to dry I think it is very difficult to stop it from getting dry. The water lost is quite difficult to recover and I think even if they fill the lake the water will still dry. some  potable water rivers are drying and now the big lakes like this too. I think that in the future we are going to have a water problem.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 17, 8:32 PM

The Aral Sea was at one time, one of the largest lakes in the world, but because of a recent drought that has affected the area. According to this article, The Aral Sea is also shrinking due “to decades-old water divisions”. The geography of the Aral Sea has also had an impact on the surrounding agricultural lands. The shrinking of the Aral Sea is having a larger than expected impact on Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan because of the receding water.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 22, 2:42 PM

It is deeply saddening to think that this once was the world's fourth largest lake. The Aral Sea is just one on a list of bodies of water that are running dry to overuse. Humans have had a large impact on this physical change however drought has also been a factor. This article states that one thing that we can do is not to purchase cotton from Uzbek and demanding our clothing designers do the same. This is due to the fact much of the lake was diverted to irrigate cotton crops in this area.

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The globalisation of work - and people

The globalisation of work - and people | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
Thanks to our connected world, now employees have become globalised, not just the companies they work for, writes Prof Lynda Gratton (BBC News - The globalisation of work - and people http://t.co/7YQSQ6Jvww)...
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Tony Hall's curator insight, September 25, 12:25 AM

This raises lots of issues. Perfect for the HL Geography core units on Globalisation & Time-Space Convergence.

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People's Climate March call for global action ahead of United Nations meeting - amNY

People's Climate March call for global action ahead of United Nations meeting - amNY | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
International Business Times People's Climate March call for global action ahead of United Nations meeting amNY Supporters of the People's Climate March said the huge turnout would be instrumental in getting UN dignitaries to meaningfully work on...
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All That Is Solid ...: Does Globalisation Breed Nationalism?

All That Is Solid ...: Does Globalisation Breed Nationalism? | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
A Very Public Sociologist - Does Globalisation Breed Nationalism? http://t.co/r9AxP6HIEG
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The world as it is: The influence of religion

The world as it is: The influence of religion | Geography is my World | Scoop.it

"Seldom has it been more important for Americans to form a realistic assessment of the world scene. But our current governing, college-­educated class suffers one glaring blind spot.

Modern American culture produces highly individualistic career and identity paths for upper- and middle-class males and females. Power couples abound, often sporting different last names. But deeply held religious identities and military loyalties are less common. Few educated Americans have any direct experience with large groups of men gathered in intense prayer or battle. Like other citizens of the globalized corporate/consumer culture, educated Americans are often widely traveled but not deeply rooted in obligation to a particular physical place, a faith or a kinship."


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MsPerry's curator insight, September 21, 3:12 PM

APHG-U3

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, September 22, 11:57 AM

Religion and its influence

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 11:19 PM

Unit 3

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Scottish Independence: New flag for UK?

Scottish Independence: New flag for UK? | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
Members of the Flag Institute have created designs for what the Union Flag could look like in the event of independence

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 13, 4:58 PM

I've already posted various links this week on Scottish independence and what it might mean, but I think these two are also worth considering.  Flags are the great icons of state identity, and a UK without Scotland might reconsider it iconography.  This links to an article from the Telegraph and a photogallery with 12 'candidate flags' for a UK that does not include Scotland.  Why might some resist the idea of creating a new national symbol?


Tags: devolutionhistorical, political, states, sovereignty, autonomy, Europe, unit 4 political, UK.

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How well do you know the world? Play Geoguessr to find out!

How well do you know the world? Play Geoguessr to find out! | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
Think you're a geography expert? Test your knowledge with BBC Travel’s Geoguessr – the game that proves how well you know the world!
Scott Langston's insight:

Challenge yourself!

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It’s Settled: No Country Does Water Management Better Than the Netherlands – Next City

It’s Settled: No Country Does Water Management Better Than the Netherlands – Next City | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
Hollands massive “Room for the River” project will forever change how we think of mitigating floods.
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‘J&K floods grim reminder of climate change’

‘J&K floods grim reminder of climate change’ | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
Unprecedented rains, unplanned urbanisation are behind the J&K floods, the Delhi-based environment research and advocacy organisation said.
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7 Billion, National Geographic Magazine - YouTube

Learn more about population: http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/7-billion To coincide with the arrival of the world's 7 billionth person on October 31, 2011, ...
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A World With 11 Billion People? New Population Projections Shatter Earlier Estimates

A World With 11 Billion People? New Population Projections Shatter Earlier Estimates | Geography is my World | Scoop.it

"In a paper published Thursday in Science, demographers from several universities and the United Nations Population Division conclude that instead of leveling off in the second half of the 21st century, as the UN predicted less than a decade ago, the world's population will continue to grow beyond 2100."


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Linda Rutledge Hudson's curator insight, September 29, 8:11 AM

I've been watching the numbers for some time and have felt, and told my students -- we would grow faster and more than previous predictions.  They have changed the #'s a few times.  This estimate seems more reasonable.

 

Caroline Ivy's curator insight, October 2, 10:57 PM

This unit focuses on immigration and population. This article shows the aftermath of both. 

 

The Earth's population is currently at about 7.1 billion people. By the time people of my generation are old and ailing, we'll be at about a 35% increase! We can't even feed ourselves now. How will we feed 11 Billion? 

 

Scientists stress the importance of education—especially women in developing countries—and believe the problem can be controlled and dealt with. 

 

There are many issues that are sure to come in the advancing years—regarding ethics, politics, human rights, of course—but there is no way to be sure. 

 

Buckle up, everyone. It's gonna be a bumpy ride. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 27, 11:46 AM

Population geography is a field that hinges on accurate data. These recent projections, if true, will alter how many countries approach population control in the future. If the UN is projecting the population to grow beyond 2100 and not level off than it is likely that in many countries anti-natal policies will start to be implemented, in some but not all cases it is likely these policies will back fire leaving some countries with populations that are too low to sustain the growth of their country. In Singapore for instance, in the 1970s the government enacted anti-natal policies that were so effective that by the mid 1980s they had negative population growth and not enough workers to replace their aging workplace. If the populations grow as the U.N. projects we may see similar circumstances occur.

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Beautiful Physical Landscapes

"#TheRidge is the brand new film from Danny Macaskill... For the first time in one of his films Danny climbs aboard a mountain bike and returns to his native home of the Isle of Skye in Scotland to take on a death-defying ride along the notorious Cuillin Ridgeline."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 3, 3:41 PM

I loved Danny Macaskill's earlier video in Scotland's cultural landscapes, and this extreme sports clip is infused with gorgeous physical landscapes.  


Tag: Scotland, sport, landscape.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 6, 5:37 AM

Beautiful Physical Landscapes

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 19, 7:37 PM

Engage boys with Landforms and Landscapes - intro video!

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The Geography of Poverty and Migration

The Geography of Poverty and Migration | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
The poor, whom we expect to move in order to improve, tend to stay put. (1 would think it'd be the reverse.
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13 Misconceptions About Global Warming

Common misconceptions about climate change. Check out Audible: http://bit.ly/AudibleVe References below: For CO2, sea levels, Arctic sea ice, Antarctic and Greenland land ice: http://climate.nasa....
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Emma Watson latest celeb to use star power to help women

Emma Watson latest celeb to use star power to help women | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
With her U.N. speech, actress Emma Watson joins a cadre of celebrities who are using their star power to bring attention to gender issues.
Scott Langston's insight:

Some interesting issues raised in Gender Inequality here

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18 "Geography Fail" Media Gaffes

18 "Geography Fail" Media Gaffes | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
Maps are hard. Not that hard, though.

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I like the 'not that hard, though' tag.

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Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, September 8, 9:53 PM

::sigh::

Jamie Strickland's curator insight, September 9, 2:28 PM

Yet another resource to add to my "this is why we take map quizzes" lecture at the beginning of the semester!!

Nancy Watson's curator insight, September 14, 11:33 AM

Unit 1 Geography Nature and Perspective. These people need perspective and a Geography course or two.

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Oldest and Youngest Populations

Oldest and Youngest Populations | Geography is my World | Scoop.it

"There are 1.2 billion people between the ages of 15 and 24 in the world today — and that means that many countries have populations younger than ever before.  Some believe that this 'youth bulge' helps fuel social unrest — particularly when combined with high levels of youth unemployment.  Youth unemployment is a 'global time bomb,' as long as today’s millennials remain 'hampered by weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.'  The world’s 15 youngest countries are all in Africa.  Of the continent’s 200 million young people, about 75 million are unemployed.

On the flip side, an aging population presents a different set of problems: Japan and Germany are tied for the world’s oldest countries, with median ages of 46.1. Germany’s declining birth rate might mean that its population will decrease by 19 percent, shrinking to 66 million by 2060. An aging population has a huge economic impact: in Germany, it has meant a labor shortage, leaving jobs unfilled."


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Silvina Paricio Tato's curator insight, September 17, 12:42 PM

Via Javier Marrero Acosta

MsPerry's curator insight, September 21, 3:16 PM

APHG-U2

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 11:17 PM

Unit 2

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Dealing with Drought: Making Tough (and Smart) Choices for Overcoming Water Scarcity

Dealing with Drought: Making Tough (and Smart) Choices for Overcoming Water Scarcity | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
As extreme or exceptional drought conditions become the new baseline in many areas, utilities and municipalities are being encouraged to embrace new technologies or reconsider old ones in order to combat the increasing water scarcity.
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