Geography is my W...
Follow
Find
329 views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Scott Langston from IB GEOGRAPHY URBAN ENVIRONMENTS LANCASTER
onto Geography is my World
Scoop.it!

Finally, Clear Performance Data for Comparing the World's Cities

Finally, Clear Performance Data for Comparing the World's Cities | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
A new international standard known as “ISO 37120” lays out 46 measures that cities on any continent can measure their performance by.

Via geographil
more...
No comment yet.

From around the web

Geography is my World
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Scott Langston from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How to Make an Attractive City

We've grown good at making many things in the modern world - but strangely the art of making attractive cities has been lost. Here are some key principles for how to make attractive cities once again.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Loreto Vargas's curator insight, May 17, 11:18 AM

I dedicate this article and its video to my fellow citizens in Santiago, Chile!!

Dedico este artículo y su video a mis conciudadanos Santiaguinos! Una lección de urbanismo!

Ethan Bernick's curator insight, May 19, 9:38 PM

This video is applicable to suburbanization in the fact that many of the same factors go into it. Suburbs too need order but sometimes too ordered can be bad. Growth limitations also have to be set.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 9:41 AM

unit 7

Rescooped by Scott Langston from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Before-and-after maps show how freeways transformed America's cities

Before-and-after maps show how freeways transformed America's cities | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
Beginning in the 1950s, cities demolished thousands of homes in walkable neighborhoods to make room for freeways.


At the time, this was seen as a sign of progress. Not only did planners hope to help people get downtown more quickly, they saw many of the neighborhoods being torn down as blighted and in need of urban renewal.  But tearing down a struggling neighborhood rarely made problems like crime and overcrowding go away. To the contrary, displaced people would move to other neighborhoods, often exacerbating overcrowding problems. Crime rates rose, not fell, in the years after these projects.  By cutting urban neighborhoods in half, planners undermined the blocks on either side of the freeway. The freeways made nearby neighborhoods less walkable. Reduced foot traffic made them less attractive places for stores and restaurants. And that, in turn, made them even less walkable. Those with the means to do so moved to the suburbs, accelerating the neighborhoods' decline.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
UCCE Sonoma County's curator insight, May 20, 11:24 AM

And perhaps the shift to the suburbs started taking prime ag land out of production to grow houses and neighborhoods. 

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 20, 5:44 PM

yet still the practice continues, especially in Third World nations trying to "catch up" with First World nations ...

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 9:40 AM

unit 7

Rescooped by Scott Langston from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Can You Name the 10 Smallest Countries in the World?

Can You Name the 10 Smallest Countries in the World? | Geography is my World | Scoop.it

"A photo gallery of the world's ten smallest countries, from 0.2 square miles on up to 115 square miles, these ten smallest countries are microstates."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Zohair Ahmed's curator insight, March 23, 2:41 AM

This picture slide show has to do with microstates, which are states or terratories that are both small in population and in size. These microstates are mostly near the sea, or even islands. Microstates have both pros and cons. Pros include having an abundant buffer zone: the sea. Another pro would be being alone, or isolated, (sometimes) this makes them free from other countries, which can be a pro and a con. A con may be that the country may have a harder time accessing fresh water, and improving agriculture with little land. Unit 4 deals with Microstates.

Samuel Meyer's curator insight, March 23, 11:53 AM

Pitcairn Island

Vatican City

Sovereign Military Order of Malta

San Marino

Monaco

Andorra

South Ossetia

Singapore

Transdniesteia

Bahrain

 

Just a few guesses...

 

Connor Hendricks's curator insight, March 23, 4:35 PM

This shows that the world is made up of several countries of different origins. people on this small island nation could have lived there for centuries. this is a goodway to show how diverse the world is.

Rescooped by Scott Langston from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Morocco: Western Sahara Conflict Reaches British Court

Morocco: Western Sahara Conflict Reaches British Court | Geography is my World | Scoop.it

The conflict over Western Sahara dates back to 1975, when, following the death of long-time ruler Francisco Franco, Spain ended its colonial rule of the territory. Spain ceded control of the territory to a joint administration by Morocco and Mauritania, but the Polisario Front - the liberation movement of the indigenous Saharawi people - refused to accept the arrangement, and launched attacks on garrisons manned by soldiers from both countries.  Morocco insists that the Western Sahara is part of its historical patrimony, and is unwilling to go beyond offering the Saharawi a limited local autonomy in what Morocco describes as the kingdom's "southern provinces."

 

Tags: borders, political, territoriality, Morocco.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Campbell Ingraham's curator insight, March 23, 11:05 AM

This conflict represents the changes and challenges to political-territorial arrangements, because Over the course of 40 years, this territory has been greatly disputed by different states. An arrangement to have Morocco and Mauritania both control the Western Sahara only lasted 4 years, because Western Sahara valued their own sovereignty and fought back. The conflict still has not been settled, and changes could occur in the upcoming years.

Gabby cotton's curator insight, March 24, 12:30 AM

Unit 5: Agriculture

The Uk is trying to label all products coming in from the Western Sahara. This is an effort to weaken Morocco's claim of the territory. The territory is highly disputed, and many products from that area say there from Morocco and not Western Sahara.


This relates to unit 5 because not only is it talking about growing and farming, but it is also talking about the area in which the crops come from. It also relates to unit 4 as the territory is highly disputed and the UK refuses to  label the crops as 'Moroccan'

Scooped by Scott Langston
Scoop.it!

Just Environmental News / “We Need Renewables,” Says World Energy Council Chair

Readers here on CleanTechnica know very well that renewable energy is now mainstream, and that solar and wind power are now even cheaper than other options in many if not most regions of the world.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Scott Langston from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Evolution of the World Map

Evolution of the World Map | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
Use our interactive In Charted Waters tool which shows information & visuals on how our knowledge of the world map has evolved.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Scott Langston
Scoop.it!

How the World’s Biggest Mall Became a Chinese ‘Ghost Town’ | TIME.com

How the World’s Biggest Mall Became a Chinese ‘Ghost Town’ | TIME.com | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
Dongguan, China, is a factory town with an estimated population of 10 million, many of whom are migrant workers from other parts of the country. But even a community that large, it seems, is unable to support a 5 million-sq.-ft. shopping center. More than twice the size of the U.S.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Scott Langston
Scoop.it!

The Insane Plan to Build the World's Tallest Towers in a Lake in China

The Insane Plan to Build the World's Tallest Towers in a Lake in China | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
These days, ambitious new skyscrapers are blanketed in a cloud of "green" buzzwords. Wind turbines! Hydrogen fuel cells! Insect farms! (Yes, insect farms.) Then there's Phoenix Towers, which has all of the above and more and looks like this. Let's call it what it is: a greenwashed dick-measuring contest.
Scott Langston's insight:

China's 'shock and awe' urbanisation plans....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Scott Langston
Scoop.it!

Why we need the UN's sustainable development goals - Agenda - The World Economic Forum

Why we need the UN's sustainable development goals - Agenda - The World Economic Forum | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
Sustainable development encompasses prosperity, social inclusion, sustainability and good governance. It is the challenge of our time, says Jeffrey Sachs.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Scott Langston
Scoop.it!

David Attenborough: Leaders are in denial about climate change

David Attenborough: Leaders are in denial about climate change | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
Sir David Attenborough is calling on global leaders to step-up their actions to curb climate change, saying that they are in denial about the dangers it poses despite the overwhelming evidence about its risks.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Scott Langston
Scoop.it!

Fogo volcano activity report – 3 new videos you certainly will love incl. extreme Close-Up

Fogo volcano activity report – 3 new videos you certainly will love incl. extreme Close-Up | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
Scott Langston's insight:

Some very cool footage here

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Scott Langston from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Africa, Uncolonized: A Detailed Look at an Alternate Continent

Africa, Uncolonized: A Detailed Look at an Alternate Continent | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
What if the Black Plague had killed off almost all Europeans? Then the Reconquista never happens. Spain and Portugal don't kickstart Europe's colonization of other continents. And this is what Africa might have looked like.

 

Tags: Africa, colonialism, borders, historical, map.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:37 AM

It is fascinating to see how different the political borders of Africa would have been without European colonial influence. One thing this map predicts is that if the Europeans would not have pushed into Africa, Arab and Islamic influences would have filled the void. The huge number of independent states or regions on this map show how large the continent is and how many different ethnic and religious groups there are.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:59 PM

I sometimes do question, what would Africa look like today if it weren't colonized by the Europeans. Before the discovery of Africa, Africa was a land that was dominated by wealthy kingdoms that spent most of its time conquering other countries. With the ideology that Africa was a land flowing with milk and honey inhabited by uncivilized human beings, conquering Africa seemed like the ideal thing for European super powers to do in order to exploit the lands natural resource at no cost. If Africa was not colonized by Europeans, Africans would have more access to their own natural resources, and the instability that most of African countries face today would most likely not be in existence.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, March 26, 2:26 PM

An interesting fact for a geographer/historian to look at is how different events happening in history can affect a map.  This is very fascinating, because Africa or should I say Alkebu-Lan has very strong looking kingdoms without the Influence of Europe.  Another interesting element of the map is how it is not Euro-centric, Africa is shown as the top of the world.  I guess in this history, Northern Europe instead of being a powerhouse of the world, would be classified as the dark region (like the Congo was in our own world).  It is also interesting how the map is not Euro-centric, but the fact to keep in mind there is the old saying, history is written by the winner.  In this case, the map of the world was drawn by the winning Europeans as well, and this map completely reverses that.  Another interesting fact, is that the Iberian is part of an Islamic Empire.  It looks, as if in this history, Portugal was overcome by the "Arabes" and Spain never even attempted to launch the Reconquista.  History and Geography, especially Political Geography are very closely linked with one another.  

Rescooped by Scott Langston from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why Earthquakes Are Devastating Nepal

Why Earthquakes Are Devastating Nepal | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
The May 12 7.3 magnitude aftershock was one of many that followed the April 25 earthquake that shook Nepal. Why is this part of the world such a hotbed of tectonic activity?

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 13, 8:11 AM

This video is in a series by National Geographic designed to show the geography behind the current events--especially geared towards understanding the physical geography.  Check out more videos in the '101 videos' series here.   

 

Tags physicalNational Geographic, tectonics, disasters, video.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 9:44 AM

Summer reading, tectonic plates

Scooped by Scott Langston
Scoop.it!

57 maps that will challenge what you thought you knew about the world

57 maps that will challenge what you thought you knew about the world | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
There's so much more to the world than we can usually glean from a traditional map of a place.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Scott Langston from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How does the United Nations work?

"Ever curious about the reaches of the United Nation and what they do? Here's a great video featuring Dr. Binoy Kampmark from RMIT University.  This short video can help improve your understanding of the UN, including its role in world politics and policy making."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
zane alan berger's curator insight, March 25, 5:32 PM

this video explains- as it says in it's headline- how the UN works. It essentially covers the different operations the UN takes part in to maintain world peace; ranging from security to human rights to disease and so on. It also talks about the security council which consists of France, the UK, US, China, and Russia, along with the general assembly.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 25, 9:11 PM

The United Nations (UN) constantly works on maintaining international peace, economic issues, and cultural and human rights around the world. The UN has a tremendous impact around the world, with 193 nations participating in frequent meeting about how to resolve global and domestic issues and making policies for the world. The UN plays an important role in &maintain[ing] international peace and security; to develop friendly relations among nations; to operate in solving international problems and in promoting respect for human rights; and finally to be a center for harmonizing the actions of nations&(WWW.UN.org). The UN has a lot of responsibilities as it tries to keep the whole world at peace.

Carlee Allen's curator insight, March 26, 7:03 PM

This is a very short and simplified video that explains all about what the UN is and what they do. The UN plays a major role in helping developing countries and taking part with them if they are in need of help or in a crisis. This video also explains what the security council is and what they do.

 

I already knew most of the things mentioned in the video, but I always think that UN things are interesting and I'm always willing to learn more about what they do and how they are helping the world.

 

 

Rescooped by Scott Langston from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Map Projections

Map Projections | Geography is my World | Scoop.it

A map projection is used to portray all or part of the round Earth on a flat surface. This cannot be done without some distortion.  Every projection has its own set of advantages and disadvantages. There is no "best" projection.  The mapmaker must select the one best suited to the needs, reducing distortion of the most important features.  Mapmakers and mathematicians have devised almost limitless ways to project the image of the globe onto paper. Scientists at the U. S. Geological Survey have designed projections for their specific needs—such as the Space Oblique Mercator, which allows mapping from satellites with little or no distortion.  This document gives the key properties, characteristics, and preferred uses of many historically important projections and of those frequently used by mapmakers today.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Carlee Allen's curator insight, March 26, 6:58 PM

This article explains and talks about 18 specific map projections. It gives a lot of detail about all of them, and describes the disadvantages and uses for all of them.

 

I thought that this was interesting because I learned more about map projections, and actually how people use them.

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, March 27, 2:05 AM

This is so useful for primary students

Christopher L. Story's curator insight, March 27, 9:59 AM

Some review help

Rescooped by Scott Langston from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What is the oldest city in the world?

What is the oldest city in the world? | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
 Mark Twain declared that the Indian city of Varanasi was older than history, tradition and legend. He was, of course, wrong. So which exactly is the world’s most ancient continuously inhabited city?

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Cass Allan's curator insight, March 1, 2:17 AM

differences of opinion about how to classify city age

 

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 15, 7:58 PM

Since the beginning of civilization, rivers have been communities' main job source. Even before B.C., the only one way to survive was to construct houses close to the nearest body of water. In the case of Crocodile City near the Nile river in Africa,the city was built close to the river due to the fertile soil and water supplied by the Nile. This enabled ancient civilizations to survive. Unfortunately, due to religious conflict between communities, some of these original civilizations were forced to relocate. Another reason for relocation is due to the movement of the bodies of water. As the paths of the rivers change, communities are forced to abandon their homes and start new civilizations so to remain close to the waters. All these communities around the river Nile relied on agriculture for its wealth and power. All these cities are examples of civilizations that have inhabited areas near rivers for centuries, even before B.C. Given their habitat, rivers will provide the necessar resources and tools for current and future generations to be able to survive.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 22, 2:55 PM

Although the question is misleading, it should say what is the oldest continuously inhabited city in the world, I enjoyed the article as once again I learned quite a bit about ancient history. Seems Aleppo, Syria is the apparent winner. They have dated the city to 6000 BC and nomads were there 5000 years before that. Shows the importance of trade as most of the contenders were on a trade route near a body of water. In fact, the article says that Aleppo was very much involved in trade until the opening of the Suez canal. Let's hope that with all the turmoil in Syria that Aleppo continues to thrive for centuries to come. Constantinople and Damascus were serious contenders but could not show continuous habitation. Aleppo according to the article, was a strong contender for commerce alongside Cairo, Egypt. Another contender, Jericho, dates back to 9000 BC but again was not continually inhabited and thus cannot lay claim to the world's oldest city.

Scooped by Scott Langston
Scoop.it!

Sao Paulo water crisis adds to Brazil business woes

Sao Paulo water crisis adds to Brazil business woes | Geography is my World | Scoop.it

Water scarcity adn economic growth....

Scott Langston's insight:

Water scarcity and economic consequences....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Scott Langston
Scoop.it!

China's 'eco-cities': empty of hospitals, shopping centres and people

China's 'eco-cities': empty of hospitals, shopping centres and people | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
China's urbanisation plan will move another 100 million people into cities by 2020 – but in Tianjin Eco-city, many green buildings still lie empty and there are no hospitals or shopping malls
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Scott Langston
Scoop.it!

This is what the world looks like if you scale countries by population

Bye, bye Canada hello super-gigantic India.
Scott Langston's insight:

Great visualisation.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Scott Langston
Scoop.it!

Graphs at a glance: Impact of occupation, unemployment, and geography on death rates in Britain ~ Ripped-off Britons

Graphs at a glance: Impact of occupation, unemployment, and geography on death rates in Britain ~ Ripped-off Britons | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
RT @RippedOffBriton: Graphs at a glance: Impact of occupation, unemployment, and geography on death rates in Britain- http://t.co/7AbY1pnssk
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Scott Langston from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

11 Signs Your Hood Is Being Gentrified

11 Signs Your Hood Is Being Gentrified | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
A Washington, D.C., resident describes the changes and privilege that have moved into her longtime neighborhood.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Evan Margiotta's curator insight, March 19, 4:18 PM

Gentrification is an interesting concept. Here in Austin we are seeing these signs all over the city. In a growing cities with growing economies the outskirts of the cities are being built up and expanding to allow for their growth. Gentrification is a very common event today, especially in places like Austin with thriving economies. However it often displaces a lot of the population with roots in that area. Its often considered a controversial topic, but is rarely talked about because of it complexity and the fact that it is often viewed as a very good thing. Unit 2 Population 

Emily Bian's curator insight, March 22, 8:48 PM

7) Uneven development, zones of abandonment, disamenity, and gentrification

This article was written by a woman who noticed a lot of changes in Washington D.C. Gentrification led to these many changes, by becoming not as unique and urbanizing at other people's expense. She describes gentrification as remodeling very quickly and ferociously. A lot of the things she says are for the general good of the people, like installing street lights, but don't take into consideration the people who don't appreciate the changes. Stores like walmart are taking over the family owned stores, and more people are moving in. 

This article describes gentrification perfectly, and I like her pictures to go along with it. I think this would help introduce this vocab term to new students. 

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 24, 12:29 AM

Sadly, gentrification happens all across the world. Poor populations in cities are disadvantaged and often have to move out due to wealthier populations moving in. One of the signs I found most disturbing was that police will start patrolling the areas where wealthier and poorer populations mix. This is a sad reality. Police do this to ensure that crime rates are low as poor people would be more tempted to commit crimes in wealthier neighborhoods. I do think this police patrolling has racist roots since the poorer population in Washington D.C. is mostly black. Words like "renewal" and "redevelopment" hide the sad reality behind gentrification/

Scooped by Scott Langston
Scoop.it!

Inside China's 'scrap village'

Inside China's 'scrap village' | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
Scott Langston's insight:

Recycling on a grand scale - implications for disparities of wealth in China

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Scott Langston
Scoop.it!

▶ Three little words: Country, Nation, State - YouTube

Richard Campanaro - Department of International Relations, London School of Economics and Political Science. How to think about what you read, hear, and see ...
Scott Langston's insight:

Country, Nation, State - same thing? Not really....

more...
No comment yet.