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Top 20 Earth Images

Top 20 Earth Images | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
With five satellites scanning the globe, DigitalGlobe has collected impressive imagery of planet Earth this year. Check out their top 20 images here.

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Just so cool...

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Alex Schaerer's curator insight, December 5, 2013 11:50 AM

Incredible images of Mother Earth. It is all of our responsibility to look past our short term existence here to ensure that she flourishes for millenia for our future generations. 

Joy Kinley's curator insight, December 6, 2013 10:49 AM

The views of Earth from Space are fascinating.  Mountains, deserts, volcanoes, islands all seen from above.  My favorite is the city of Aleppo. What is yours?

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:31 PM
Five satellites have taken some of the most amazing photos of amazing places all over the world. The photos show the beauty of each place some places i never even knew existed.

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Africa, Uncolonized: A Detailed Look at an Alternate Continent

Africa, Uncolonized: A Detailed Look at an Alternate Continent | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
What if the Black Plague had killed off almost all Europeans? Then the Reconquista never happens. Spain and Portugal don't kickstart Europe's colonization of other continents. And this is what Africa might have looked like.

 

Tags: Africa, colonialism, borders, historical, map.


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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 23, 5:00 PM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Christian Allié's curator insight, November 24, 3:30 AM

.............""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""..................

 

....... Africa's problems were caused by the borders drawn by European colonists in ignorance of tribal lines.

 

[ ... ]

 

.......... slam of course did not originate in Africa, and some would claim that its dominance of large areas of Africa, at the expense of pre-existing belief systems, is as much an example of foreign cultural imperialism as the spread of Western religions and languages is in our day. But that is material for another thought experiment. This one aims to filter out the European influence.

Neither European nor Arab influence is in evidence in the southern part of Africa – although some toponyms relate directly to states in our timeline: BaTswana is Botswana, Wene wa Kongo refers to the two countries bearing that name. Umoja wa Falme za Katanga is echoed in the name of the DR Congo's giant inland province, Katanga. Rundi, Banyarwanda and Buganda, squeezed in between the Great Lakes, are alternative versions of 'our' Burundi, Rwanda and Uganda.

[ ... ]

Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 24, 8:53 PM

On the flip side, here is a 19th century map highlighting how "colonizable" particular regions of Africa were considered back then by Europeans.  

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Here's what 9,000 years of breeding has done to corn, peaches, and other crops

Here's what 9,000 years of breeding has done to corn, peaches, and other crops | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
Corn, watermelon, and peaches were unrecognizable 8,000 years ago.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 28, 1:25 PM

I think the term 'artificial' in the image might be misleading and it depends on your definition of the word.  Humans have been selectively breed plants and animals for as long as we've been able to domestic them; that is a 'natural' part of our cultural ecology and has lead to great varieties of crops that are much more suitable for human consumption than what was naturally available.  Long before climate change, humans have been actively shaping their environment and the ecological inputs in the systems with the technology that their disposal.  This is a good resource to teach about the 1st agricultural revolution.     


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, unit 5 agriculture.

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The largest city in Brazil is running dangerously low on water

The largest city in Brazil is running dangerously low on water | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
Thanks to the worst drought in eight decades, millions of people in São Paulo are facing water outages.


Tags: Brazil, urban, water, urban ecology, climate change, environment depend, sustainability, agriculture, food production.


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Miles Gibson's curator insight, November 23, 12:30 PM

Unit 1 nature and perspectives of geography

This map shows the time lapse of a lake in Sao Paulo in Brazil and shows how the water is running low.

This relates to unit 1 because it shows the maps as It is a GPS map and a GIS layering map. This a basic definable part of this unit because of its maps, scale, sense of place, identity, and overall relativity. This is a simple GIS layering map over the Jaguari resovoir.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 23, 4:59 PM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 25, 12:49 PM

Brazil’s largest city, Sao Paulo, which provides one third of the countries GPD, is now running low or water due to one of the worst droughts in 8 years. There are more than 21 million people in this city and 13 million of them are facing water outages. If it doesn't rain soon, the city could face a collapse. The city has blamed the drought of lack of water in the vapor clouds that the amazon usually provides to the city. They also blame it on deforestation and global warming. President Dilma Rousseff has questioned the cities misusage of their water supply, claiming that the city mismanaged their water supply.  

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The World Is Becoming A Better Place

The World Is Becoming A Better Place | Geography is my World | Scoop.it

"People who love to complain about how horrible everything is also love to point out that the world is always changing — and change is of course always horrible, because it destroys the way things used to be. It's easy to get depressed by all the 'everything is horrible' talk.  So it's nice to sometimes remind ourselves that some things — many things, in fact — are getting better all the time."


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A positive spin on some of the plusses of globalisation

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Caterin Victor's curator insight, November 10, 8:24 PM

I am very sorow, but the world is not better,  and not because of the changing, the thing the way it used to be, because the Arabs went crazy, nuts, with the ISIS, Daesh and in the desire of a Muslim Caliphat, and killing  everywhere  and anybody like phsichopats,  and the world became an ugly and dangerous place to live in. Democratie is allmost non existing, and the people are scared like hell.!!!  Is this a better place?? I doubt !!!    

Beth Marinucci's curator insight, November 12, 5:49 AM

Some good news . . .

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 19, 5:10 PM

It is easy to talk about all the things that are wrong with the world today. It is a nice change in pace posting about something good going on in the world for once. Covering all regions of the world, this article is about how the world is becoming a better place. Thank god. Looking at the annual death because of battle, it is clear to see that the world is in fact, getting better. There are less deaths, which in turn also mean that there are less battles going on in the world. Poverty rate has also gone way down in the past couple of years. Even though there is still a huge amount of poverty, it has been getting better throughout the years. Another chart presented along with many other, was the life expectancy rate going through the roof. The best example is China, having their life expectancy at age 30 in the 1960's to age 75 now. There is still much room for improvement in the world such as disease, poverty, and climate changes, but this article makes me worry a little less about our world today.   

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The Berlin Wall fell 25 years ago, but Germany is still divided

The Berlin Wall fell 25 years ago, but Germany is still divided | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
Stunning satellite images and maps show how east and west differ from each other even today.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 2, 8:05 PM

These two maps (unemployment on the left and disposable income on the right) are but two examples in this article that highlights the lingering distinctions between the two parts of Germany that were reunited 25 years ago.  The social geographies imposed by the Iron Curtain and the Berlin  Wall are still being felt from this relic border and will for years to come. 


Tags: Germany, industry, laboreconomichistorical, politicalborders.

16s3d's curator insight, November 4, 2:11 AM

On efface pas 40 ans d'histoire en 25 ans, ni même en 40...(?)

Peter Phillips's curator insight, November 6, 11:43 AM

50 years of communist rule still affect opportunities in Germany today, as these maps show. What they don't show is the social mirror that each provides to the other and the rich discussions about social policy that result. Reunification has been an expensive exercise for Germany, however one that it is committed to.

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7 Billion, National Geographic Magazine - YouTube

Learn more about population: http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/7-billion To coincide with the arrival of the world's 7 billionth person on October 31, 2011, ...
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A World With 11 Billion People? New Population Projections Shatter Earlier Estimates

A World With 11 Billion People? New Population Projections Shatter Earlier Estimates | Geography is my World | Scoop.it

"In a paper published Thursday in Science, demographers from several universities and the United Nations Population Division conclude that instead of leveling off in the second half of the 21st century, as the UN predicted less than a decade ago, the world's population will continue to grow beyond 2100."


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Linda Rutledge Hudson's curator insight, September 29, 8:11 AM

I've been watching the numbers for some time and have felt, and told my students -- we would grow faster and more than previous predictions.  They have changed the #'s a few times.  This estimate seems more reasonable.

 

Caroline Ivy's curator insight, October 2, 10:57 PM

This unit focuses on immigration and population. This article shows the aftermath of both. 

 

The Earth's population is currently at about 7.1 billion people. By the time people of my generation are old and ailing, we'll be at about a 35% increase! We can't even feed ourselves now. How will we feed 11 Billion? 

 

Scientists stress the importance of education—especially women in developing countries—and believe the problem can be controlled and dealt with. 

 

There are many issues that are sure to come in the advancing years—regarding ethics, politics, human rights, of course—but there is no way to be sure. 

 

Buckle up, everyone. It's gonna be a bumpy ride. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 27, 11:46 AM

Population geography is a field that hinges on accurate data. These recent projections, if true, will alter how many countries approach population control in the future. If the UN is projecting the population to grow beyond 2100 and not level off than it is likely that in many countries anti-natal policies will start to be implemented, in some but not all cases it is likely these policies will back fire leaving some countries with populations that are too low to sustain the growth of their country. In Singapore for instance, in the 1970s the government enacted anti-natal policies that were so effective that by the mid 1980s they had negative population growth and not enough workers to replace their aging workplace. If the populations grow as the U.N. projects we may see similar circumstances occur.

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Beautiful Physical Landscapes

"#TheRidge is the brand new film from Danny Macaskill... For the first time in one of his films Danny climbs aboard a mountain bike and returns to his native home of the Isle of Skye in Scotland to take on a death-defying ride along the notorious Cuillin Ridgeline."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 3, 3:41 PM

I loved Danny Macaskill's earlier video in Scotland's cultural landscapes, and this extreme sports clip is infused with gorgeous physical landscapes.  


Tag: Scotland, sport, landscape.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 6, 5:37 AM

Beautiful Physical Landscapes

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 19, 7:37 PM

Engage boys with Landforms and Landscapes - intro video!

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The Geography of Poverty and Migration

The Geography of Poverty and Migration | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
The poor, whom we expect to move in order to improve, tend to stay put. (1 would think it'd be the reverse.
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13 Misconceptions About Global Warming

Common misconceptions about climate change. Check out Audible: http://bit.ly/AudibleVe References below: For CO2, sea levels, Arctic sea ice, Antarctic and Greenland land ice: http://climate.nasa....
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▶ Three little words: Country, Nation, State - YouTube

Richard Campanaro - Department of International Relations, London School of Economics and Political Science. How to think about what you read, hear, and see ...
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Country, Nation, State - same thing? Not really....

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The changing shape of world demographics

Animating the changing shape of the world population pyramid. For more multimedia content from The Economist visit our website: http://econ.st/1xqEZhX.


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Great resource for looking at Population Pyramids

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Sally Egan's curator insight, November 25, 10:05 PM

An outstanding videao explaining the population oyramid and how and why the world's population pyramid is changing fro the traditional pyramid to a block or column shaped graph.

 

L.Long's curator insight, November 25, 11:19 PM

Population challenges

José Antônio Carlos - O Professor Pepe's curator insight, November 26, 7:14 AM

Até a pirâmide demográfica está em crise!

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Half of China's top 10 rivers polluted: report - China.org.cn

Half of China's top 10 rivers polluted: report - China.org.cn | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
The water in half of China's top 10 river systems is polluted, and about 60 percent of the nation's underground water is of poor quality.
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BREAKING: The US and China just announced a huge deal on climate—and it's a gamechanger

BREAKING: The US and China just announced a huge deal on climate—and it's a gamechanger | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
The surprise agreement aims to double the pace of carbon pollution reduction in the US.
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Eerie Landforms

Eerie Landforms | Geography is my World | Scoop.it

Utah's Fantasy Canyon features mudstone eroded into bizarre shapes. This one's called "Flying Witch". #Halloween

 

Tags: physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms, Utah.


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McDonald's International

McDonald's International | Geography is my World | Scoop.it

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GLOBALISATION AND Macck
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Matt Davidson's curator insight, November 7, 8:22 PM

I'm lovin it

This is a great website for year 9, looking at both food and global interconnections

Dennis Swender's curator insight, November 8, 6:00 AM

A traditional approach of multicultural education may provide some interesting sociopolitical insights. 

aitouaddaC's curator insight, November 8, 3:44 PM

New in Charente : "Made for you" the menu in the Mc Donald's restaurant of Ruffec... (France)

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Female Genital Mutilation - "Mums come begging us to do it"

A woman who performs FGM procedures in Egypt - three a week despite it being banned - talks to the BBC's Orla Guerin.
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World’s Largest Dam Removal Unleashes U.S. River After Century of Electric Production

World’s Largest Dam Removal Unleashes U.S. River After Century of Electric Production | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
The last section of dam is being blasted from the Elwha River on Washington's Olympic Peninsula on Tuesday.

 

For almost half a century, the two dams were widely applauded for powering the growth of the peninsula and its primary industry. But the dams blocked salmon migration up the Elwha, devastating its fish and shellfish—and the livelihood of the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe. As the tribe slowly gained political power—it won federal recognition in 1968—it and other tribes began to protest the loss of the fishing rights promised to them by federal treaty in the mid-1800s. In 1979, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Washington tribes, including the Elwha Klallam, were entitled to half the salmon catch in the state.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 9, 1:16 PM

See also this video to see the rapid changes on the nearby White Salmon River when they removed the dam. 


Tags: biogeography, environment, land use, sustainability, environment adapt.

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The Political Geography of Hong Kong's Protests

The Political Geography of Hong Kong's Protests | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
The territory's residents are demanding democracy in city intersections, not central squares.

 

The significance of the protests, which have brought tens of thousands into the streets, lies not only in what protesters are demanding but also in where they're demanding it—and where they're not. Consider that pro-democracy demonstrations in Hong Kong typically happen in Victoria Park, which is about two and a half miles from Central District and which hosts the annual June 4 candlelight vigil commemorating the 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown in Beijing. This time around, however, few police or protesters have ventured there.

The unpredictable, spontaneous geography of the protests is important precisely because it transcends the status quo. It is a testament to how serious these demonstrations are that they refuse to be contained.

Tags: political, conflict, governance, China, East Asia.


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 6, 3:26 PM

The relative location of these protests are what is important in the OCLP movement. The protest are no longer contained to the Victoria Park, the are popping up in intersections and seriously disrupting the status quo of every day life in Hong Kong. The geography of these protest illustrate how different and important the OCLP movement may be. This movement shows how geography can help explain social movements. Because the OCLP movement is popping up in areas where no other protest have occurred, it is hinting to the possible large scale influence the movement might have.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 7, 10:02 AM

The increased visibility of the internet and globalization has made large scale demonstration not only a good way to show civil discontent but the preferred method of increasing awareness of an issues across the world. Because Hong Kong is such an integrated part of global economy, they can stage these massive protests without too much fear of violent police reaction, as the world will be quick to condemn such action as soon as it happens. While the protests started as a student movement, it has now spread throughout the city and both younger and older people, students and professionals, have begun to participate. This popular participation shows how serious these issues are to the people of Hong Kong.

Chandler and Zane's curator insight, October 16, 4:44 PM

Political: There have been lots of protest lately in China. Chief executive CY Leung announced that he is planning to shut down Hong Kong's  central district. People are not happy with this and the protest are becoming very big for this little island. 

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Where Has All the Water Gone?

Where Has All the Water Gone? | Geography is my World | Scoop.it

"Once the fourth-largest lake in the world, Central Asia's shrinking Aral Sea has reached a new low, thanks to decades-old water diversions and a more recent drought." 


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Water Scarcity

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Edelin Espino's curator insight, October 10, 2:47 PM

The Aral Sea is drying. This was one of the four largest lakes in the world. A saltwater lake and now the water is evaporating and is getting even saltier because as the water evaporates into the atmosphere and minerals like salt left on the surface the remaining water is saltier. Something could be causing the water to dry but even if they know what is causing it to dry I think it is very difficult to stop it from getting dry. The water lost is quite difficult to recover and I think even if they fill the lake the water will still dry. some  potable water rivers are drying and now the big lakes like this too. I think that in the future we are going to have a water problem.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 17, 8:32 PM

The Aral Sea was at one time, one of the largest lakes in the world, but because of a recent drought that has affected the area. According to this article, The Aral Sea is also shrinking due “to decades-old water divisions”. The geography of the Aral Sea has also had an impact on the surrounding agricultural lands. The shrinking of the Aral Sea is having a larger than expected impact on Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan because of the receding water.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 22, 2:42 PM

It is deeply saddening to think that this once was the world's fourth largest lake. The Aral Sea is just one on a list of bodies of water that are running dry to overuse. Humans have had a large impact on this physical change however drought has also been a factor. This article states that one thing that we can do is not to purchase cotton from Uzbek and demanding our clothing designers do the same. This is due to the fact much of the lake was diverted to irrigate cotton crops in this area.

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The globalisation of work - and people

The globalisation of work - and people | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
Thanks to our connected world, now employees have become globalised, not just the companies they work for, writes Prof Lynda Gratton (BBC News - The globalisation of work - and people http://t.co/7YQSQ6Jvww)...
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Tony Hall's curator insight, September 25, 12:25 AM

This raises lots of issues. Perfect for the HL Geography core units on Globalisation & Time-Space Convergence.

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People's Climate March call for global action ahead of United Nations meeting - amNY

People's Climate March call for global action ahead of United Nations meeting - amNY | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
International Business Times People's Climate March call for global action ahead of United Nations meeting amNY Supporters of the People's Climate March said the huge turnout would be instrumental in getting UN dignitaries to meaningfully work on...
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