Geography is my World
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More Mexicans leave than enter USA in historic shift

More Mexicans leave than enter USA in historic shift | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
After four decades of mass migration to the U.S., more Mexicans are now returning home.

Via Seth Dixon
Scott Langston's insight:

Reverse of a long-standing in Mexican-US migration

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Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 9:44 PM

With less jobs now in the u.s. and the economic growth in Mexico this is a good reason for Mexicans to head back home. What people do not realize at least I did not is the fact that there is a lot of entrepreneurship on the streets of Mexico. Since 2000 the changes that have occurred in Mexico is economy, education, politics and lower birth rates. 

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, December 2, 2015 12:17 PM

The first thing I thought while I was reading this was "I wonder if Donald Trump, and his flock of moron followers have seen these statistics?" I mean, never let the truth get in the way of a good hate speech right?! But as I continued reading I couldn't help but worry about the effect this could have on the American economy. The truth is that illegal's do the work we aren't willing to do. Do you know any American kids who want to work in the fields of Alabama picking watermelon's for $5 an hour? Hell, do you know any American kids who want to work, period? Do I actually think a watermelon is worth $13?

John Puchein's curator insight, December 4, 2015 6:51 AM

Due to a Mexican economy rebounding and a slow down in the American economy making it harder to find jobs, we are seeing a change in Mexican immigration patterns. While this has been suspected for years, Pew research finalized a study. 

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Wall for nothing: the misjudged but growing taste for border fences

Wall for nothing: the misjudged but growing taste for border fences | Geography is my World | Scoop.it

"Globalisation was supposed to tear down barriers, but security fears and a widespread refusal to help migrants and refugees have fuelled a new spate of wall-building across the world, even if experts doubt their long-term effectiveness. When the Berlin Wall was torn down a quarter-century ago, there were 16 border fences around the world. Today, there are 65 either completed or under construction, according to Quebec University expert Elisabeth Vallet."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 18, 2015 12:11 PM

This is an intriguing opinion piece that would be good fodder for a class discussion on political geography or the current events/refugee crisis. 


Tags: borders, political.

Nflfootball Live's curator insight, September 19, 2015 8:04 AM

https://www.reddit.com/3ljqnq/

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 23, 2015 3:53 PM

unit 2 or 4

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Morocco: Western Sahara Conflict Reaches British Court

Morocco: Western Sahara Conflict Reaches British Court | Geography is my World | Scoop.it

The conflict over Western Sahara dates back to 1975, when, following the death of long-time ruler Francisco Franco, Spain ended its colonial rule of the territory. Spain ceded control of the territory to a joint administration by Morocco and Mauritania, but the Polisario Front - the liberation movement of the indigenous Saharawi people - refused to accept the arrangement, and launched attacks on garrisons manned by soldiers from both countries.  Morocco insists that the Western Sahara is part of its historical patrimony, and is unwilling to go beyond offering the Saharawi a limited local autonomy in what Morocco describes as the kingdom's "southern provinces."

 

Tags: borders, political, territoriality, Morocco.


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Campbell Ingraham's curator insight, March 23, 2015 11:05 AM

This conflict represents the changes and challenges to political-territorial arrangements, because Over the course of 40 years, this territory has been greatly disputed by different states. An arrangement to have Morocco and Mauritania both control the Western Sahara only lasted 4 years, because Western Sahara valued their own sovereignty and fought back. The conflict still has not been settled, and changes could occur in the upcoming years.

Gabby cotton's curator insight, March 24, 2015 12:30 AM

Unit 5: Agriculture

The Uk is trying to label all products coming in from the Western Sahara. This is an effort to weaken Morocco's claim of the territory. The territory is highly disputed, and many products from that area say there from Morocco and not Western Sahara.


This relates to unit 5 because not only is it talking about growing and farming, but it is also talking about the area in which the crops come from. It also relates to unit 4 as the territory is highly disputed and the UK refuses to  label the crops as 'Moroccan'

Devyn Hantgin's curator insight, May 27, 2015 7:46 AM

Territorial dimensions of politics

This article is about a boundary dispute between Moroccan people and polish people. 

This relates to our unit because they are using British court to settle their dispute about boundaries. 

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Can You Name the 10 Smallest Countries in the World?

Can You Name the 10 Smallest Countries in the World? | Geography is my World | Scoop.it

"A photo gallery of the world's ten smallest countries, from 0.2 square miles on up to 115 square miles, these ten smallest countries are microstates."


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Zohair Ahmed's curator insight, March 23, 2015 2:41 AM

This picture slide show has to do with microstates, which are states or terratories that are both small in population and in size. These microstates are mostly near the sea, or even islands. Microstates have both pros and cons. Pros include having an abundant buffer zone: the sea. Another pro would be being alone, or isolated, (sometimes) this makes them free from other countries, which can be a pro and a con. A con may be that the country may have a harder time accessing fresh water, and improving agriculture with little land. Unit 4 deals with Microstates. 

 

Microstates are discussed in Unit 4, and all of these are examples of Microstates. Microstates have many pros and cons listed above.

Samuel Meyer's curator insight, March 23, 2015 11:53 AM

Pitcairn Island

Vatican City

Sovereign Military Order of Malta

San Marino

Monaco

Andorra

South Ossetia

Singapore

Transdniesteia

Bahrain

 

Just a few guesses...

 

Connor Hendricks's curator insight, March 23, 2015 4:35 PM

This shows that the world is made up of several countries of different origins. people on this small island nation could have lived there for centuries. this is a goodway to show how diverse the world is.

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The Political Geography of Hong Kong's Protests

The Political Geography of Hong Kong's Protests | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
The territory's residents are demanding democracy in city intersections, not central squares.

 

The significance of the protests, which have brought tens of thousands into the streets, lies not only in what protesters are demanding but also in where they're demanding it—and where they're not. Consider that pro-democracy demonstrations in Hong Kong typically happen in Victoria Park, which is about two and a half miles from Central District and which hosts the annual June 4 candlelight vigil commemorating the 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown in Beijing. This time around, however, few police or protesters have ventured there.

The unpredictable, spontaneous geography of the protests is important precisely because it transcends the status quo. It is a testament to how serious these demonstrations are that they refuse to be contained.

Tags: political, conflict, governance, China, East Asia.


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Morgan Manier's curator insight, April 24, 5:20 PM
This article relates to our class by people protesting and with our projects, people in Syria protested and were punished and this relates to political geography. My opinion is that people should be acknowledged with why they are protesting and where they are doing it, also how it affects everyone else. 
Colby Geiger's curator insight, April 28, 7:25 AM
This article relates to political geography because the protestors of Japan are protesting to shut down the cities main shopping center where the government buildings are. The people of Japan want democracy and I believe that they should have it. To me, democracy is a fair way for the people of a country to choose a ruler and have everybody heard for their opinions.
Kobie Carroll's curator insight, April 28, 11:44 AM
I believe the OCLP (Occupy Central with Love and Peace) campaign had good intentions, wanting to build a truly harmonious society. I, however, believe they made a wrong decision to shut down Hong Kong's Central District. This relates to what we are learning because it shows how individuals with conflicting views can express hate towards each other in one geographical area.
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Scottish Independence: New flag for UK?

Scottish Independence: New flag for UK? | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
Members of the Flag Institute have created designs for what the Union Flag could look like in the event of independence

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 13, 2014 4:58 PM

I've already posted various links this week on Scottish independence and what it might mean, but I think these two are also worth considering.  Flags are the great icons of state identity, and a UK without Scotland might reconsider it iconography.  This links to an article from the Telegraph and a photogallery with 12 'candidate flags' for a UK that does not include Scotland.  Why might some resist the idea of creating a new national symbol?


Tags: devolutionhistorical, political, states, sovereignty, autonomy, Europe, unit 4 political, UK.

Jason Schneider's curator insight, February 12, 2015 6:03 PM

The UK flag is known for representing a union between England and Scotland. It's known as the "Union Jack." The white on the UK flag represents peace peace and honesty and the blue represents loyalty and truth. It's a shame that those two colors have to change to Black and Yellow which I don't know what those colors would represent. If you put a Scottish flag with a UK flag, you won't find any yellow or black so I believe that Scotland is trying to exclude England and Scotland's alike colors such as blue and white and try to create a stronger equal union with England.

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ISIS: A New Threat

ISIS: A New Threat | Geography is my World | Scoop.it

In this lesson, students will:

Explore the role of ISIS in the Middle EastInterpret political cartoons on the U.S. response to ISISIdentify the techniques used by cartoonists to express political opinionMonitor the news media coverage of ISIS over time


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 20, 2015 12:29 PM

The Choices Program produces some great materials and this is from their Teaching with the News series.  The newest in the series is a resource guide for the terrorist attacks in Paris.  


Tags:  political, terrorism, conflict, geopolitics, ISIS, Choices.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 27, 2015 4:32 PM

Guerras

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Infographic: The Syrian conflict

Infographic: The Syrian conflict | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
Syria's civil war has inflicted a humanitarian crisis, expansive exodus of the population and a severe death toll. New Internationalist presents the facts in this zoomable infograph.

 

Tags: infographic, Syria, migration, political, refugees.


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Fran Martin's curator insight, September 18, 2015 6:29 AM

This might help if any questions come up, particularly if working with upper KS2 or beyond.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 23, 2015 3:54 PM

unit 2

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How does the United Nations work?

"Ever curious about the reaches of the United Nation and what they do? Here's a great video featuring Dr. Binoy Kampmark from RMIT University.  This short video can help improve your understanding of the UN, including its role in world politics and policy making."


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Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 2015 8:47 PM

Unit 4

This video explains what goes on at United Nations meetings. 193 people gather in New York to discuss matters of peace and security. Established in 1945 made up of 50 countries and made to prevent another World War. The UN deals with matters of economics social policy, human rights, and culture. And the most important parts is the security council (made up of France, Britain, the United States, China, and Russia) and the general assembly. 

Jacob McCullough's curator insight, May 26, 2015 6:01 PM

Just a nice brief summary or how the United nations worked for political geography 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 8:47 AM

The UN is one of the most impact organizations we have today. The UN is a powerful peacekeeping supranational organization organized to help all nations and countries

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The Berlin Wall fell 25 years ago, but Germany is still divided

The Berlin Wall fell 25 years ago, but Germany is still divided | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
Stunning satellite images and maps show how east and west differ from each other even today.

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Peter Phillips's curator insight, November 6, 2014 11:43 AM

50 years of communist rule still affect opportunities in Germany today, as these maps show. What they don't show is the social mirror that each provides to the other and the rich discussions about social policy that result. Reunification has been an expensive exercise for Germany, however one that it is committed to.

Jacob Conklin's curator insight, February 12, 2015 6:20 PM

The Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, but its influence is still present in today's Germany. History plays a key role in the shaping of political boundaries and that history is clearly evident in Germany. The line where the Berlin wall once stood still divides the country economically. The western part of Germany is far more economically affluent than the east. The USSR may be gone, but its influence still remains. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:14 AM

These two maps (unemployment on the left and disposable income on the right) are but two examples in this article that highlights the lingering distinctions between the two parts of Germany that were reunited 25 years ago.  The social geographies imposed by the Iron Curtain and the Berlin  Wall are still being felt from this relic border and will for years to come. 


Tags: Germany, industry, labor, economic, historical, political, borders.

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The world as it is: The influence of religion

The world as it is: The influence of religion | Geography is my World | Scoop.it

"Seldom has it been more important for Americans to form a realistic assessment of the world scene. But our current governing, college-­educated class suffers one glaring blind spot.

Modern American culture produces highly individualistic career and identity paths for upper- and middle-class males and females. Power couples abound, often sporting different last names. But deeply held religious identities and military loyalties are less common. Few educated Americans have any direct experience with large groups of men gathered in intense prayer or battle. Like other citizens of the globalized corporate/consumer culture, educated Americans are often widely traveled but not deeply rooted in obligation to a particular physical place, a faith or a kinship."


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Brett Laskowitz's curator insight, January 28, 2015 12:17 PM

My APHUG students will read this article before even beginning our study of religion.  My hope is that this may at the very least help them empathize with the religious fervor that still has such a profound impact on the culture of much of the world.  

Evan Margiotta's curator insight, March 18, 2015 12:26 PM

With the rise and fall of human civilizations have come the rise and fall of religions as well. Americans have grown unaware of the  beliefs and teachings of other religions. They do not know the difference between ethnic and universalizing religions. They do not know that Islam is the fastest expanding religion in the world even though Christianity still has the most followers. Unit 3 Culture

Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 2015 3:57 PM

This article shows how religion affects the world around us and its importance in governments. Especially in the middle east (Saudi Arabia), countries often import factors of their major religion into their government. 

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India and Pakistan Reunited

"It’s rare that a video from a brand will spark any real emotion--but a new spot from Google India is so powerful, and so honest to the product, that it’s a testament not only to the deft touch of the ad team that put it together, but to the strength of Google’s current offering."--Forbes


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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 2:38 AM

This video is reminiscent of the families separated during the Korean war recently being allowed to visit one another. While tensions still exist between India and Pakistan many have begun to come to peace with the concept their nations won't be unified under either's rule. Because of this cooling of tensions families and friends are now able to see each other again after years without seeing them. Of course this is a Google commercial so the sincerity is somewhat diminished because of it's origins.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 3:11 PM

The most intriguing commercial that shows the differences and consequences of what happens between two nations. It shows hurt and feelings no human should have to go through. The biggest thing with this is how that after so much time apart two different people of different religions or countries can come back together and remain friends after so long of conflicting issues.

MA Sansonetti-Wood's curator insight, January 26, 2016 9:29 PM
Seth Dixon's insight:

True, this is a commercial--but what a great commercial to show that the history of of a geopolitical conflict has many casualties including friendships across lines.  This isn't the only commercial in India that is raising eyebrows.  This one from a jewelry company is proudly showing a divorced woman remarrying--something unthinkable for Indian TV one generation ago. 


Questions to Ponder: How does the Indian media reflect the values and beliefs of Indian culture?  How does the Indian media shape Indian culture?