Geography is my World
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'Love locks' to be removed from Paris bridge

'Love locks' to be removed from Paris bridge | Geography is my World | Scoop.it

"The city of Paris will start removing padlocks from the Pont des Arts on Monday, effectively ending the tourist tradition of attaching 'love locks' to the bridge. For years, visitors have been attaching locks with sentimental messages to the bridge in symbolic acts of affection. Some further seal the deal by throwing keys into the Seine River below.  It was considered charming at first, but the thrill wore off as sections of fencing on the Pont des Arts crumbled under the locks' weight. The bridge carries more than 700,000 locks with an estimated combined weight roughly the same as 20 elephants."


Via Seth Dixon
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Leslie G Perry's curator insight, June 2, 2015 8:32 AM

I LOVE Seth Dixon's insight on this and how it figures in with Design Technology. What mark do we leave and why? What are the unintended consequences of leaving out mark?

 

Seth Dixon's insight:

Graffiti, tombstones, love locks, monuments...each of these are manifestations of people's desire to have some tangible impact on the landscape.  Something that manifests a connection to place in a profoundly personal way. 

 

Questions to Ponder: Why do people want leave a mark on places that are meaningful to them?  When do you think that they that these markers are appropriate or inappropriate?  Do we have more of a 'right' to mark some places than others? Why do many oppose these personal marks on the landscape?

Linda Denty's curator insight, June 4, 2015 8:32 PM

Great discussion point for your classes!  As Seth Dixon says why do people choose to leave a mark on certain places and is this appropriate?  Could people be doing something else that doesn't have such a deleterious effect on it's environment?  

CMuddGeo's curator insight, June 7, 2015 6:29 PM

This is understandable but very sad...

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Inequality and the Gini Coefficient

Inequality and the Gini Coefficient | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
Think everyone should just pull themselves up by their bootstraps? Try this one on for size.

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:00 PM

Educating in poverty

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, October 16, 2013 7:47 AM

Do you find this information surprising?

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:20 AM

This video shows the place matters; a Washington D.C. educator shows how food deserts and other spatial problems of poverty impact his students on a daily basis.  We usually look at life expectancy data at the national scale and that obscures some of the real issues of poverty in developed countries.  Above is a map that shows the Gini index which measures the degree of economic inequality (the Gini coefficient was recently added to the APHG course content for the Industrialization and Economic Development unit).  Here are some maps and data from the World Bank that utilizes the Gini Index as well as an interactive Gapminder graph.  


Tags: industry, location, place, migration, APHG, poverty, socioeconomic.

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11 Signs Your Hood Is Being Gentrified

11 Signs Your Hood Is Being Gentrified | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
A Washington, D.C., resident describes the changes and privilege that have moved into her longtime neighborhood.

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Emily Bian's curator insight, March 22, 2015 8:48 PM

7) Uneven development, zones of abandonment, disamenity, and gentrification

This article was written by a woman who noticed a lot of changes in Washington D.C. Gentrification led to these many changes, by becoming not as unique and urbanizing at other people's expense. She describes gentrification as remodeling very quickly and ferociously. A lot of the things she says are for the general good of the people, like installing street lights, but don't take into consideration the people who don't appreciate the changes. Stores like walmart are taking over the family owned stores, and more people are moving in. 

This article describes gentrification perfectly, and I like her pictures to go along with it. I think this would help introduce this vocab term to new students. 

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 24, 2015 12:29 AM

Sadly, gentrification happens all across the world. Poor populations in cities are disadvantaged and often have to move out due to wealthier populations moving in. One of the signs I found most disturbing was that police will start patrolling the areas where wealthier and poorer populations mix. This is a sad reality. Police do this to ensure that crime rates are low as poor people would be more tempted to commit crimes in wealthier neighborhoods. I do think this police patrolling has racist roots since the poorer population in Washington D.C. is mostly black. Words like "renewal" and "redevelopment" hide the sad reality behind gentrification/

Ricardo Cabeza de Vaca's curator insight, May 25, 2015 9:36 PM

I believe this article is very interesting because it shows how gentrification can change a neighborhood. I believe gentrification is a little bit of a negative thing because it adds geographical uniformity to our modern society and yes that could be good thing in measure. The article states now police patrol every street, Walmart's and 7-11's start showing up, areas will start becoming more aesthetically pleasing, but is that really a good thing? I believe that sometimes while you are driving by it is better to have a change in your surrounding, rather than seeing the same thing over and over again even if it is more modern.