Geography is my W...
Follow
Find tag "China"
340 views | +0 today
Geography is my World
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Scott Langston from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Political Geography of Hong Kong's Protests

The Political Geography of Hong Kong's Protests | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
The territory's residents are demanding democracy in city intersections, not central squares.

 

The significance of the protests, which have brought tens of thousands into the streets, lies not only in what protesters are demanding but also in where they're demanding it—and where they're not. Consider that pro-democracy demonstrations in Hong Kong typically happen in Victoria Park, which is about two and a half miles from Central District and which hosts the annual June 4 candlelight vigil commemorating the 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown in Beijing. This time around, however, few police or protesters have ventured there.

The unpredictable, spontaneous geography of the protests is important precisely because it transcends the status quo. It is a testament to how serious these demonstrations are that they refuse to be contained.

Tags: political, conflict, governance, China, East Asia.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 7, 2014 10:02 AM

The increased visibility of the internet and globalization has made large scale demonstration not only a good way to show civil discontent but the preferred method of increasing awareness of an issues across the world. Because Hong Kong is such an integrated part of global economy, they can stage these massive protests without too much fear of violent police reaction, as the world will be quick to condemn such action as soon as it happens. While the protests started as a student movement, it has now spread throughout the city and both younger and older people, students and professionals, have begun to participate. This popular participation shows how serious these issues are to the people of Hong Kong.

Chandler and Zane's curator insight, October 16, 2014 4:44 PM

Political: There have been lots of protest lately in China. Chief executive CY Leung announced that he is planning to shut down Hong Kong's  central district. People are not happy with this and the protest are becoming very big for this little island. 

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 2014 2:43 PM

The seemingly random geography of protests shows an inability to be contained and how demographics play a key role in these protests. The protests have broken up into multiple smaller groups, blocking off intersections, and popping up in different locations that are not traditionally used for protesting. Instead of amassing in one large group, the protesters are using an almost guerrilla-like tactic by breaking into smaller numbers that are harder to disband or predict. While protests were traditionally held in Victoria Park, these groups are popping up in all sorts of locations, including residential, school, tourist, and shopping locations. Many college and high school aged children are joining the fray, which is why protests are occurring in areas synonymous with students and younger demographics. Families are also getting involved, which is why some are in residential areas. It is evident that people from all different demographics support democracy.  

Rescooped by Scott Langston from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

China's one-child policy creates massive gender imbalance

The Chinese government says its so-called "one-child policy" has succeeded in reining in its population. But more than three decades after the policy's imple...

Via Natalie K Jensen, Seth Dixon
more...
Christina Dadaian's comment, July 5, 2013 4:13 PM
They'll have to balance out eventually. Either that or have the entire population suffer. It may take time but I imagine that things will correct themselves before it's too late.
Brooklyn McKenzie's comment, August 2, 2013 12:14 PM
It's kind of sad. I hope that those four brothers will some day find the love of their life. It must be pretty sad to see happy couples when you're single. Maybe one day things will even out.
Shelby Porter's curator insight, September 21, 2013 5:28 PM

This video gives a summary of the extreme consequences the "one-child policy" China has set in place. There are so many more men than women now, many are left to be bachelors for life. Many Chinese women are moving into the city looking for a rich and powerful man, and they succeed because there men are eager to marry. The Chinese have always had a preference for male children over female children. Now that the difference in population in so high, the government has made it illegal for doctors to tell parents the sex of their child before birth. This is a great example of the different kinds of culture that exist on the other side of the world. 

Rescooped by Scott Langston from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

China Turns To Africa For Resources, Jobs And Future Customers

China Turns To Africa For Resources, Jobs And Future Customers | Geography is my World | Scoop.it
In China's Second Continent, Howard French explores the Chinese presence in 15 African countries. The relationship goes beyond economics: more than a million Chinese citizens have migrated to Africa.

 

He says there's a debate about the long-term consequences of China's push into the African continent: Will it create development and prosperity, or will it lead to exploitation reminiscent of 19th-century European colonialism?


Tags: Africa, development, China, industry, economic, podcast.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 10:40 AM

Is good that China decided to make business outside of its territories. With this plan, they are helping they own economic, but also improving other people lives with the airport and highway.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 4:05 PM

Though the age of European Imperialism has long since ended, China is beginning to realize the benefits involved with economic expansion into other countries. "More than a million Chinese citizens have permanently moved to Africa, buying land, starting businesses and settling among local populations." Many are worried that this push into Africa could lead to extreme exploitation and disparity among native Africans while China solely benefits. If you compare this scenario with what is occurring in Myanmar and other parts of Southeast Asia, it would seem that China is there specifically for its own benefit. 

David Lizotte's curator insight, April 5, 1:47 PM

Only the Chinese would see a potential market in Africa...

However, in all seriousness I too see the potential market. The continent is huge. The population is ridiculous and it is only going to keep growing. A population of this magnitude needs goods to live. In turn, China will provide for this demand. However it is blatant that the market (African people) will be exploited at whatever cost. The manufacturing, selling, etc. is being done, according to this article, by Chinese people. These people left China in search of money and perhaps even a place to settle down. China is expanding to Africa so a lot of Chinese people are going to move to Africa for employment. China wins by increasing its economic output and losing its dead weight. By dead weight I mean the chinese citizens whom stem from lower middle class. These people were struggling in China. China could not produce jobs for them. These people then follow the money to Africa and once there "job" is done decide to stay and live in Africa. As stated by the article this is an independent decision being made. I understand that and I recognize it as not being an immediate concern.

What concerns me is the exploitation of natural resources as well as the exploitation of the African market. China will produce goods that they know will be sold in Africa- they will design everything to meet Africa's wants and needs, thus taking there money. An African business will not benefit from this commerce rather a Chinese firm, with Chinese workers. One can argue its business and I suppose it truly  is. China see's a continent that they can invest in. There country will benefit from it as well as its people, whom are finding jobs abroad and continue to work abroad due to the affluent economy. The Chinese see African people as "demand" and they want to "supply" for that never ending demand. 

The article mentions/compares this situation to colonialism. It certainly does seem like a form of exploitation in which the foreign investors make money off of the African people and the regions resources however it is being done in a business like fashion. This could be seen as the more modern form of colonialism. It's not a direct rule over a territory and people rather its a business venture. But couldn't the business venture be seen as a front? 

What's interesting is how China is very much taking a hands off approach in the local politics. They aren't getting immersed in the government rather they see themselves as business people operating in another country...for China's benefit. They aren't there to provide goods for the African people out of the goodness of there heart rather they just want to sell the goods that they know will sell to the massive population. China is setting up shop in a non-democratic way, in which they don't care about the society rather they just care about the financial benefit. The political standing of the country does not bother China. Also, this could be seen as China thinking long term. Instead of thinking democratically and "more fair like" China can focus more on its own business and people and not have to worry about crisis in the country as a whole. 

More than a million Chinese have emigrated to the continent of Africa to start business'. More Chinese will travel to Africa...chain migration... they will develop and make money off of the African market. Chinese will elevate there status in Africa off of the backs of natural resources (in Africa) as well as make money from the African market. A market that will be exploited-whether good or bad- exploited non the less.