Geography Insights
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Geography Insights
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Curated by Peishi Huang
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Impact Of Tourism: Thailand

http://www.tvchoice.uk.com 

 

Beautiful beaches, wonderful scenery and friendly people — Thailand seems the ideal tourist destination. But what don't they tell you in the holiday brochure?

The Thai tourist authority is pushing "ecotourism", which, in theory at least, doesn't damage the environment. Ecotourists take rafts down river, ride elephants in lush green spaces, visit Buddhist temples and tribal hill people whose lifestyles haven't changed for hundreds of years.

But critics say the hill people are treated like "human zoos".

There are worries, too, about cruelty to elephants. But the most notorious problem is sex tourism - which includes men, women and children.

The Thai economy is now critically dependent of tourism spending - but how much has been lost in the rush to exploit the visitor invasion? And are local people getting their fair share? 

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Enough Food for Everyone IF | Oxfam Education

Enough Food for Everyone IF | Oxfam Education | Geography Insights | Scoop.it
The IF campaign brings together a movement of people who believe that there is enough food to feed everyone one in the world, IF… By learning more about the issues at the heart of IF, you can help to develop your students' understanding...
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CNN Explains: Tropical cyclones

CNN Meteorologist Ivan Cabrera explains what a tropical cyclone is and why they are a necessary evil.
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The future of fish farming

Closed containment is the future of salmon farming in B.C. Sea lice infestations, farm waste, disease and escaped farmed salmon could be distant, unpleasant ...
Peishi Huang's insight:

blue revolution - advantages and disadvantages of fish farming

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Four strong earthquakes signal angry ‘Ring of Fire’

Four strong earthquakes signal angry ‘Ring of Fire’ | Geography Insights | Scoop.it
The Pacific 'Ring of Fire' has been angry over the past day, producing four strong earthquakes since yesterday afternoon. North-central Chile was the first to feel the Ring's wrath, as a magnitude 6.8 quake went off at about 3:15 p.m.
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Video -- Giant Hailstones Pummel Scientists -- National Geographic

December 27, 2012—In the American Midwest's infamous Tornado Alley, giant hailstones rain down on National Geographic explorer Tim Samaras.
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Antarctica braces for influx of invasive species

Antarctica braces for influx of invasive species | Geography Insights | Scoop.it
Antarctica and the Southern Ocean may seem very far away from civilization, but they are at great risk of losing their unique qualities due to human activities.
Peishi Huang's insight:

climate change

 

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'Geography Education' posts Geo-coded

'Geography Education' posts Geo-coded | Geography Insights | Scoop.it

I'm pleased to announce that for GIS Day, I created a map that has hyperlinks to regionally specific posts that I put on 'Geography Education.'  This map was created using ArcGIS Online (here's a free tutorial on how to to use ArcGIS Online tailored for K-12 educators).  This is just another way to search for materials on this site.  Feel free to embed this map on your webpage or share the link.  I'll add more tags in the future as well (just click on the icon to get a pop-up, then click on the image to see the posts).  Happy GIS Day!


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Jamie Strickland's comment, November 16, 2012 6:15 AM
How cool is this!! This will make it even easier to teach my World Regional and Global Connections courses! Thanks, Seth.
Matt Mallinson's comment, November 19, 2012 8:40 AM
Overall I think this is a good map. There are a few countries that I think could have better abbreviations, North Korea for example is labeled "N" and South Korea is labeled "SK". I went and looked for an "NK" label and there wasn't one. The map is flawed in that way because of the shortage of tools the program gives you to use. The shortage of tools also leads to many places with the same globe image or same lettering as other places. I think you did a good job with what you had available to use.
Charles Matley's comment, November 19, 2012 8:46 AM
This map is great. I The use of the national geographic map makes it more manageable and appealing to the eye. The categorization of posts into geographic locations is very clever. It could potentially be viewed as more "fun" because it is interactive.
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A Barrier to Peace

A Barrier to Peace | Geography Insights | Scoop.it

"Why would they want to pull down these walls?” asks William Boyd mildly as he offers me a cup of tea in his home at Cluan Place, a predominantly Loyalist area of east Belfast.

 

These walls, orginally installed in the late 60s to protect Belfast residents during "the Troubles."  Today, some argue that these walls are now barriers to the peace process as they continue defacto segregation.  Walls, as barriers to diffusion, stifle communication, cooperation and interaction.  Still, these walls are symbols of communal identity and icons in the cultural landscape.  For more academic work on this, see Peter Shirlow's Belfast: Segregation, Violence and the City.

 

Questions to Consider: How would a wall through an already culturally and politically divided city impact both sides of the wall?  Today, are the walls beneficial to peace in Northern Ireland?       

 

Tags: Ireland, states, borders, political. 


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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 28, 2013 4:38 PM

The walls in Belfast Ireland were put in the 60's to protect the residents and today many people argue they need to come down. My grandmother just returned from a trip to Ireland and Belfast was one of the areas they went. She said it was very sad, Christians had to walk on one side of the street and Protestans on the other in one area and the tour bus driver was being voice monitered by the police the whole time. There is so much seperation in Befast because of that wall and more people dont want it taken down then want it down for anything to be done. 

Marissa Roy's curator insight, October 30, 2013 9:14 AM

The barrier in Belfast, Ireland is an impressive one. It has been there since the 1960s and having it there has become a security for the residence on both sides. Neither side wants it taken down, however, they have extremely different political/religious views. It seems strange to me that these people would prefer living in prison-like conditions just because that is the way it has been for so long. So long as the physical walls stay up, so will the cultural walls between these people.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 5:13 AM

This article is about large walls which were constructed fifty years ago to separate a part Belfast, Northern Ireland to protect citizens from conflicts between loyalists and separatists. Q wall separating people could temporarily protect people from violent conflict, but it would undoubtedly ensure continued conflict and intensify the feeling of "Us vs. Them." Though the people interviewed from both sides of the wall in the article like the wall since it gives them a feeling of security, the wall is likely damaging to a peace process in Northern Ireland.

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TED-Ed Beta A New Service to Turn Videos into Engaging Lessons

TED-Ed Beta A New Service to Turn Videos into Engaging Lessons | Geography Insights | Scoop.it
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Digital Topographic Maps

Digital Topographic Maps | Geography Insights | Scoop.it
Home page of USGS Topographic Maps...

 

The last paper editions of USGS topographic masp came out in 1973 and 1992.  If you are waiting for the next print edition, you'll be waiting a long time.  Like so many other agencies with information distribution, the USGS topo maps have gone digital.  In 2001 the USGS announced the production of a current, seamless digital National Map.  You can still quadrangle chunks of the National map and download them for free as PDFs (with geospatial extensions for measuring). 

 

Tags: mapping, cartography, geospatial.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 2, 7:25 PM

The last paper editions of USGS topographic maps came out in 1973 and 1992.  If you are waiting for the next print edition, you'll be waiting a long time.  Like so many other agencies with information distribution, the USGS topo maps have gone digital.  In 2001 the USGS announced the production of a current, seamless digital National Map.  You can still quadrangle chunks of the National map and download them for free as PDFs (with geospatial extensions for measuring).   You can search for aerial imagery here.


Tags: mapping, cartography, geospatial.

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[FIELDWORK IDEA] Social Media and Place

[FIELDWORK IDEA] Social Media and Place | Geography Insights | Scoop.it
Facebook most social cities: People everywhere use Facebook to check in to places. Here you can see the 5 top hotspots of the most "social"cities.

 

Questions to ponder: What attributes do these commonly 'checked into' landmarks have in common?  Are you surprised that some are or are not on the list?

 

Tags: socialmedia, place, tourism, infographic, 


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[FIELDWORK IDEA] 80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks

[FIELDWORK IDEA] 80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks | Geography Insights | Scoop.it

The green dots on this map representing Starbucks locations which are obviously clustered in major metropolitan centers.  Cross-referencing this Starbucks address location with population data, Davenport explains his mapping technique: "By counting the number of people who live within a given distance to each Starbucks, we can measure how well centered Frappuccinos are to the US citizenry. In other words: draw a 1-mile circle around every store, then add up the % of the population living within the circles. Repeat for 2, 3, 4....100 miles."   The result of this data is a fabulous logrithmic S-curve which explains much about the American population distribution.   

 

Tags: statistics, density, consumption, mapping, visualization, urban.


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Rich's comment, October 10, 2012 10:26 AM
That is insane how large that corperation is.
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Climographs

Climographs | Geography Insights | Scoop.it

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1832 Cholera Epidemic in NYC

1832 Cholera Epidemic in NYC | Geography Insights | Scoop.it
A cholera outbreak in New York in 1832 led to broad efforts to clean up the city and others like it.

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How a hurricane is born - The Science Of Superstorms - BBC

A fascinating look at how a little girl walking in the sand of the African desert could cause a hurricane 4000 miles away in the USA. Great video from BBC sh...
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GOOD Transparency: Cost of Food

Thanks to industrial, processed food, Americans have been spending less and less on what we eat. But those savings come with a high cost: obesity, diabetes, ...
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Video -- "Chasing Ice" Photographer Talks Melting Glaciers -- National Geographic

December 18, 2012—National Geographic photographer James Balog discusses Chasing Ice, a new documentary featuring time-lapse photographs of the rapidly melting Arctic.
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Spectacular collapse of famous arch caught on camera

Spectacular collapse of famous arch caught on camera | Geography Insights | Scoop.it
The arch at Tennessee Beach, just north of the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco, had been photographed hundreds of times over the years, but never like this. Robert Wills captured the total collapse of the famous arch in photos.
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GIS Day video

GIS Day video | Geography Insights | Scoop.it

This is a great video for GIS day (TODAY!) to remember why and how spatial thinking and spatial technologies can improve education and communities.   GIS will be a mainstay in the emerging workplace.


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How Pandemics Spread

View Full Lesson on TED-ED BETA: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-pandemics-spread In our increasingly globalized world, a single infected person can board a pl...

 

This is a great demonstration of why spatial thinking is critical to so many fields, including medicine.

 

Tags: diffusion, medical, historical, spatial.


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The 33 Digital Skills Every 21st Century Teacher should Have

The 33 Digital Skills Every 21st Century Teacher should Have | Geography Insights | Scoop.it
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The British have invaded 9 out of 10 countries

The British have invaded 9 out of 10 countries | Geography Insights | Scoop.it
Britain has invaded all but 22 countries in the world in its long and colourful history, new research has found.

 

This is a great map to show the historical impact of colonialism on the world map.  The map is based on the work in the new book All the Countries We've Ever Invaded: And the Few We Never Got Round To.   

 

Tags: book reviews, colonialism, war, historical, UK


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Don Brown Jr's comment, November 5, 2012 10:22 AM
Military conflict is often at times overlooked at as a source of language diffusion however the information displayed in this article can help explain how English has become one of the most popular languages in the world today.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 4:33 PM

The British have done this in reality, in the physical world, in space and time... but perhaps the Chinese have done this in our minds!  Everything our country trades for has parts made in China.  We simply can't live without these things that may be invented in the US, and designed in the US, but assembled in China.... China has a name for itself, and they're playing a game of Monopoly.  They have hotels on Board walk and Park place, and they're eating us alive... I've conferred with politicians, who say that they're on the verge of turning their hidden empire into a physical one, and going from simple monetary domination to war.  They outnumber the US, and have better technology, and evidently more skill and products.  Not much to say about that, but if they learn from the mistakes of the British, the Chinese could really create a truly elite empire that could outlast any other in human history...  But really, if they include American/Chinese cuisine in their menu, I'm sold at General Tao's chicken... Go China! 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 5:36 PM

This map illustrates just how wide-reaching the British Empire was throughout its history. Though the map cheats a little by including the activities of sanctioned pirates and minor invasions, almost the whole world excepting several very small nations and some difficult to reach inland ones.

 

The most surprising was Sweden considering the proximity and the frequent viking invasions on the British isles which were apparently never reciprocated.

 

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Shoreline Engineering | Coastal Care

Shoreline Engineering | Coastal Care | Geography Insights | Scoop.it
Shoreline engineering is a general phrase that refers to any method of changing or altering the natural shoreline system in order to stabilize it.
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SEC 2 GEOG: Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

 

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial patterns within the global dataset (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings in distinct places and when analyzed at various scales). It is also a fantastic way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model.

 

Tags: population, scale, visualization, Demographics, models, unit 2 population, sustainability, regions, spatial.


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Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 8:07 AM

Watching this video made me think how or if it's possible to have that many people on earth and still have enough food, jobs, and shelter for everyone. The carrying capacity seems way too densed. It is possible to fit a high number of people in one area year by year as long as we know how to use the space thats given to us. I dont think many countries have come up with an good logic or plans on how to sustain the overpopulated areas throught the globe. If they did, then there would be enough food, shelter, and jobs. There wouldn't be so many people unemployed, malnourished, and homeless if the government would come up with a plan.

Sierra_Mcswagger's curator insight, September 10, 6:43 AM

This video is a great representation of our population's past and where it stands now. In the past our population was considered stable, where births cancelled out deaths, and the increase rates were regulated. Now, as we are advancing with better medicine, and agriculture we have fewer deaths, but still have lots of births. We've grown from one billion to seven billion in two hundred years. Chances are it wont continue growing this fast, but, if it does indeed grow we need to control are resources. (S.S.)

payton sidney dinwiddie 's curator insight, September 10, 6:44 AM

I enjoy this video because it gives a visual analysis of the worlds population. It also shows what an effect that the medical and as well as the agricultural revolution played as in a role in our worlds population. It also shows that america isn't  as big as we think .