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Geography in the News: Cobras

Geography in the News: Cobras | Geography in the News | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM MISSING COBRA! EEEEK! The escape of a highly venomous Egyptian cobra at the end of March, 2011, forced the Bronx Zoo to close for more than a week.
Neal G. Lineback's insight:

Cobras are one of the world's most fascinating snakes. This is a brief geographical description of the habitats of the Egyptian and King cobras.

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Geography in the News: Mormons

Geography in the News: Mormons | Geography in the News | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM THE GEOGRAPHY OF MORMONISM          The Mormon faith is in the news, as a new atlas,  Mapping Mormonism: An Atlas of Latter-day Saint History, (by Brandon S.
Neal G. Lineback's insight:

This new atlas is an award winner.

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Geography in the News: The Long Trail of Tears

Geography in the News: The Long Trail of Tears | Geography in the News | Scoop.it
Researched and written by Kelly Gregg and edited by Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM THE CHEROKEES’ TRAIL OF TEARS A few people each summer seek to follow some of the many famous trails that crisscross the United...
Neal G. Lineback's insight:

This is one of the many tragedies that befell Native Americans during the European settlement of the Americas.

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Geography in the News: Endangered Mountain Ecosystem

Geography in the News: Endangered Mountain Ecosystem | Geography in the News | Scoop.it
The Red-Spruce/Fraser Fir Ecosystem:  One of the Southern Appalachian Mountains’ Most Endangered   By Saskia van de Gevel, Assistant Professor, Appalachian Tree Ring Lab, Department of Geography and Planning, & Mark Spond, Ph.D., Liaison to the...
Neal G. Lineback's insight:

This is a classic article about the endangered islands of red spruce and Fraser fir on some of the highest Appalachian peaks.

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Geography in the News: World Fisheries

Geography in the News: World Fisheries | Geography in the News | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM DECLINE IN OCEAN FISHERIES The world may be running out of places to catch wild fish.
Neal G. Lineback's insight:

The decline in ocean catches of wild fish has focused intense attention on the geographic patterns of overfishing. This article explains how it happened and what the implications are for the future.

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Geography in the News: The Timeless Titanic Story

Geography in the News: The Timeless Titanic Story | Geography in the News | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM A New Titanic is Coming April 15th 2012 marked the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the luxury passenger ship Titanic.
Neal G. Lineback's insight:

The Titanic story is in the news again, as an Australian financier has contracted to build a replica which will sail in 2016. This is another chapter in the century-long Titanic story.

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Geography in the News: Death on Greenland

Geography in the News: Death on Greenland | Geography in the News | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM and Maps.com CONSEQUENCES OF GREENLAND’S ERRATIC WEATHER              A recent BBC (May 1, 2013) article reported the death of the leader of a team attempting to hike across...
Neal G. Lineback's insight:

The recent death on Greenland of a man attempting to trek across the high glacier demonstrates the true dangers on one of the world's two largest glaciers.

 

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Geography in the News: Australia’s Dingos

Geography in the News: Australia’s Dingos | Geography in the News | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM and Maps.com DINGOES OFFICIALLY BLAMED IN 1980’s INFANT DEATH A doubly tragic story unfolded in Australia in 1980 that’s still making international news 33 years later.
Neal G. Lineback's insight:

This is a tragic story dealing with Australia's dingos. Living with wild animals whether dingos, bears, lions or wharf rats can have tragic consequences under the right circumstances.

 

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Geography in the News: Pike’s Peak

Geography in the News: Pike’s Peak | Geography in the News | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM and Maps.com COLORADO’S MOST FAMOUS MOUNTAIN The state of Colorado and relatives of Zebulon Montgomery Pike celebrated the 200th anniversary in 2006 of the historic expedition...
Neal G. Lineback's insight:

Pike's Peak remains one of the "must see" landscape features in the West.

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Geography in the News: Auschwitz Remembered

Geography in the News: Auschwitz Remembered | Geography in the News | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM and Maps.com Auschwitz Remembered As Ultra-Nationalists Target Minorities Once more, ultra-nationalist parties are becoming more involved in Europe’s politics.
Neal G. Lineback's insight:

This article provides an analysis of the geography and history of Nazi's death camps.

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Six Famous Geographers - GIS Lounge

Six Famous Geographers - GIS Lounge | Geography in the News | Scoop.it
Neal G. Lineback's insight:

Famous Geographers from the past. I fully agree with five of the six. What do you think?

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Geography in the News: Hot Chocolate

Geography in the News: Hot Chocolate | Geography in the News | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM and Maps.com LOVING HOT CHOCOLATE A new type of chocolate came on the market around 2010.
Neal G. Lineback's insight:

A Geography of the origin, production and consumption of this decadent confection, chocolate, iis included in this GITN article, rewritten and posted on David Braun's National Geographic NewsWatch blog.

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Alissa Charalambous's comment, August 21, 2013 2:41 PM
Wow I had no idea that hot chocolate could be so beneficial! Who knew that it could slow the aging process and prevent wrinkles! Not to mention, it also hydrates your skin! I always drink hot chocolate in the winter, but now that I know it has some positive factors, I will definitely be drinking more when it starts to get cold again!
Mary Coates's comment, August 29, 2013 2:45 PM
I had heard before that "chocolate was good for you." I think they meant to say "cocoa was good for your skin." I'm pretty sure M&M's aren't as "good for you" as fruit, but they definitely have thier benefits an it's a good excuse to be able to eat tons of chocolate! I'm glad I got that cleared up as to IF chocolate was good for me.
miranda's comment, September 8, 2013 1:31 PM
I loved reading this article. It was very intriguing because I always read about chocolate being bad for your skin and just awful for your overall health but this article showed it is good for keeping your skin young and not old and wrinkly. I also found out that coco is not the official name for the chocolate bean it is actually called a cacao bean. It is called coco because it was easier to spell. Now since I have learned all this I think chocolate should be eaten once a day! -Miranda Delaney
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Geography in the News

Geography in the News | Geography in the News | Scoop.it
To make Geography relevant to students throughout the world.
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Posted just as the Boston Marathon was captured!

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Geography in the News: Pumpkins

Geography in the News: Pumpkins | Geography in the News | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM                             PUMPKINS: HALLOWEEN AND THANKSGIVING TRADITIONS Halloween and Thanksgiving are just around the corner and pumpkins are already showing up at roadside...
Neal G. Lineback's insight:

Pumpkins are a favorite crop in many countries of the world--not just the United States.

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Geography in the News: Quinoa

Geography in the News: Quinoa | Geography in the News | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Quinoa: An Old and New Nutritional Food in Western Diets In February, the United Nations declared 2013 “The International Year of Quinoa.” Quinoa is the latest trendy food...
Neal G. Lineback's insight:

Quinoa is a new food for most Westerners, but for Bolivians and Peruvians in the Andes, it has been a nutritious part of their diets for generations. Recently, in fact, a 125-year old in the Andes attributed his longevity to quinoa (KEEN-wah). Now Quinoa has been "discovered" by Americans and Europeans. And the economic geography of the crop is changing.

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Geography in the News: Chagas Coming

Geography in the News: Chagas Coming | Geography in the News | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM CHAGAS: THE KISSING BUG’S DISEASE Recent news releases have highlighted some of the exotic animals infesting the United States.
Neal G. Lineback's insight:

Didjuno? The Kissing Bug is here. There is an exotic South American bug now present in this country, nicknamed the "Kissing Bug," that carries a dangerous disease called Chagas. Check it out.

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Geography in the News: A New International Canal?

Geography in the News: A New International Canal? | Geography in the News | Scoop.it
Guest Authors: Malavika Nidhi and Rahul Nagvekar, students of Mrs.
Neal G. Lineback's insight:

This is an article about a proposed canal that has raised religious, environmental and economic concerns in India and Sri Lanka.

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Geography in the News: Ethiopia’s Dam Projects

Geography in the News: Ethiopia’s Dam Projects | Geography in the News | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM ETHIOPIA’S CAPTURE OF THE BLUE NILE In addition to Egypt’s latest political turmoil, its government is extremely worried about Ethiopia’s newest dam on the headwaters of the Blue...
Neal G. Lineback's insight:

This article explains the geography involved in the latest news from East Africa over the vital water of the Blue Nile.

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Geography in the News: Eurasia’s Boundaries

Geography in the News: Eurasia’s Boundaries | Geography in the News | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM THE GEOGRAPHICAL DIVISIONS OF EUROPE AND ASIA Europe and Asia, while often considered two separate continents, both lie on the same landmass or tectonic plate, the Eurasian...
Neal G. Lineback's insight:

This is one of those boundaries between cultures that have changed throughout time. This article helps to understand why the separation between Europe and Asia has been difficult for students to understand.

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Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 2:26 PM

If Europe and Asia are not different continents based on the tectonic plates that they both share, would that mean that Russia is in a fact a part of Europe. Wouldn't its ties be closely link to that of Asia, because growing up in school, I was taught that Russia was closely related to the Asian continent than it was to Europe. Though Russia is sometimes perceived as being its own continent, I wonder what this discovery will mean for them long term.

David Lizotte's curator insight, February 20, 1:32 PM

The article states that the idea of separate continents comes from European scholars whom wanted to give more definition to there culture and area of the world, essentially there region. I wonder if this could be said in regards to the inhabitant East of the Ural Mountains. Did they want a form of boundary to represent and distinguish there region? None the less, we live in the west so the western perspective is what guides us. 

Even if there never was a Europe and an Asia, there would still be land disputes as to whom has claim to which region/area of land. On a global perspective its viewed as Europe and Asia but when one takes a closer look its simply country and country... not continent and continent. This article is revealing the importance of Eurasia, how it truly does exist. A quasi boundary is not going to separate the once "two continents" rather nothing separates the continents, its all part of Eurasia. 

A neat part of the article is how the writer states recognizing the land mass as two continents is old and out of date. Its basically wrong and non-intelligent. I believe this is important and is something that needs to be recognized on a national scale (here in the United States). Personally I've always recognized the realm as "Eurasia." I now feel more intelligent for doing so! How do people in Europe and with this being said Asia, feel about this more reformed definition of the supercontinent? Do they even recognize it as true? Perhaps they realize there are more important issues at hand like current  countries  disputed and invaded borders.

None the less there is disputed boundaries on a more micro level, when compared to the continent versus continent scheme. For example Russian backed separatists have claimed a portion of Eastern Ukraine. Do people actually see this as Asians expanding into Europe or rather a transcontinental country (Russia) expanding itself more westward. The importance here lies in the disputed country boundaries, not continental boundaries, yet one cannot not deny the significance of the  "continental boundary" which some people do believe in. But the core of the matter is the country to country ratio. 

 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 9, 2:25 PM

This was interesting to read because I don't associate the two till I can visually see it.  Then to further call it Eurasia makes sense as well.  There is a population that are considered Asian Russians.  I did a study on this culture and I couldn't believe there were Asian Russians. This sounds crazy.  It would make sense for cross cultures in this region.  

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Protests 'no Turkish Spring' says PM

Protests 'no Turkish Spring' says PM | Geography in the News | Scoop.it
PM Recep Tayyip Erdogan again condemns the anti-government protests in Turkey, saying they do not constitute a Turkish Spring.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 6, 2013 7:48 PM

Many young citizens are accusing the Turkish government of becoming increasingly authoritarian and have taken to the streets as they fear that their secular society will follow more traditional Islamic values (just last week, the sale of alcohol was outlawed).  Over 1,700 have been arrested in 67 cities in these protests in the last few days.


Tags: conflict, political, Turkey.

Sarah Baker's comment, June 7, 2013 1:36 AM
That's no a good news. !
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News Watch

News Watch | Geography in the News | Scoop.it
National Geographic News Blog
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For a GITN on the ecology of the grizzly bear, read this post on David Braun's NatGeo Newswatch blog.

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Geography in the News: Keystone Pipeline and Canadian Tar Sands

Geography in the News: Keystone Pipeline and Canadian Tar Sands | Geography in the News | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM and Maps.com KEYSTONE PIPELINE AND CANADIAN TAR SANDS CONTROVERSY Supporters and protesters continue to lobby both the White House and U.S.
Neal G. Lineback's insight:

This is a Geography in the News dealing with the background of the Keystone pipeline proposal and Canadian tar sands.

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 18, 2013 8:28 PM

One thing I bet most people did not know is that we get most of our foregin oil from Canada ans not an OPEC country at all.  This source really can help the US, but it does have drawbacks.  Expensive to refine, dangerous to ship in the proposed pipeline as it can corrode the pide easily.  Again seems a cost benefit analysis needs to be done, especailly with the US have large oil reserves in shale oil.  Is that source of oil cheaper to produce thereby growing domestic oil production??  Or is it cheaper to import the oil because of other considerations, like labor and environmental regulations?

Paige Therien's curator insight, February 22, 2014 4:01 PM

This controversial pipeline project would allow the transportation of crude oil from Alberta, Canada's Athabasca Oil Sands to the United State's Gulf Cost.  This proves to be a difficult feat.  Extracting oil from this source is very difficult since it is also mixed with clay and sand, making it very dirty.  Transportation of this dirty substance through the pipeline would be equally as hard and risky since there is a risk that the oil could corrode the pipe.  This poses severe environmental and safety risks.  This pipeline passes through an international border and seven U.S. states which play huge roles in feeding the country.  A pipeline passing through this area could easily pollute the Mississippi River Basin, which is the main water source for the people and the crops located in the central area of the country.  There have also been cases where corroded pipelines have allowed widespread fires to occur, which is a possibility here.  Extracting oil from this source would allow North America to be self-reliant, however, there are many drawbacks to creating such a huge pipeline which originates in such dirty oil sources.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 15, 2014 12:57 PM

The three main arguments against Keystone XL is, one; making liquid fuel from tar sands keeps the United States dependent on a very polluting source of energy. Instead of moving towards cleaner sources of energy, the US would continue being one of the highest in CO2 in emissions. Secondly; the pipeline  has risks that include spills because the tar sands oil could corrode the pipe line and leak. And thirdly, the oil from keystone could be sold to foreign markets instead of staying domestic. Although the US needs to start being less dependent on foreign oil the Keystone pipeline is not the way to do so. Oil itself is not a permanent solution, it will run out and it continues to harm the environment. This pipeline defiantly poses more risks than anyone should be comfortable with.

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Geography in the News: Guantanamo

Geography in the News: Guantanamo | Geography in the News | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM and Maps.com Guantanamo’s Troubles The U.S. Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, was selected by President George W.
Neal G. Lineback's insight:

This is a review of the historical geography of the U.S. Naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, updated with the ongoing hunger strikes by about 100 of the 166 prisoners and the associated political issues.

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Chechnya: 200 years of background in four minutes


Via Seth Dixon
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This is a marvelous four-minute piece on the North Caucasus region's storied geography and history.

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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 18, 2014 3:55 PM
The video gives a cohesive background of Chechnya. The background of those in Chechnya and Russia, and their tactics raise major red flags as such acts of violence are all they have ever known.   
Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 15, 2014 6:56 PM

The video accurately details Chechnya's long history and how it has come to be today. By understanding this one can see why exactly the they have been such a thorn in Russia's side in their quest for independence. After the deportation of the entire Chechen nation by the Soviets it is no wonder that they would be displeased with their current position especially considering other nation got their freedom with the Fall of the USSR.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, April 21, 1:24 PM

Chechnya, why so much has been made about Chechnya, the nationality of the Boston Bombers. Since then much talk about Chechnya. Around 200 years ago Russians came to conquer Chechnya. The entire Chechnya population was shipped to Cyberia by joseph Stalin, now recognized as a genocide. This is where the term send them to Cyberia developed. A second war in 1999 brought even more chaos to Chechnya. This morphed a radical religious feeling in the Chechnya people. It can be seen among attacks on Russia from Chechenia’s terrorists.

 

the new leader has a firm grip on the country and it has become a more silent nation

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Geography in the News: The Caucasus’ Storied Cultural Geography

Geography in the News: The Caucasus’ Storied Cultural Geography | Geography in the News | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner Geography in the NewsTM and Maps.com CHECHNYA AND THE CAUCASUS REGION Among the world’s longest-lived hotspots is the Caucasus region, rivaling only the Balkans as a volatile kettle of violent and...
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Posted a few minutes after the Boston Marathon bomber was taken into custody.

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