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Why everyone should be able to read a map

Why everyone should be able to read a map | Geography in the news | Scoop.it
New research suggests that map reading is a dying skill in the age of the smartphone. Perish the thought, says Rob Cowen

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What do you think about this?

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Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 2014 9:17 AM

this can explain why it is important to NOT always rely on technology. It is good to keep your brain active and the spatial awareness that comes with reading a map is invaluable

Dolors Cantacorps's curator insight, September 5, 2014 3:13 PM

Practiquem-ho a classe doncs!

Richard Thomas's curator insight, July 30, 2015 10:52 PM

Despite the gendered overtones of the article (that it's important for men to learn to read a map), this is some good advice, regardless of gender.  The vocabulary and concepts of maps can strengthen spatial cognition and geography awareness.  While GPS technology can help us in a pinch, relying primarily on a system that does not engage our navigation skills will weaken our ability to perform these functions.  While it intuitively makes sense, that the 'mental muscles' would atrophy when not used, it is a reminder that an overuse of geospatial technologies can be intellectually counterproductive.  So break out a trusty ol' map, but more importantly, be a part of the spatial decision-making process. 


Tags: mapping, spatial, technology, education.

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Where Will The World's Water Conflicts Erupt?

Where Will The World's Water Conflicts Erupt? | Geography in the news | Scoop.it

As the climate shifts, rivers will both flood and dry up more often, according to the latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Shortages are especially likely in parts of the world already strapped for water, so political scientists expect feuds will become even more intense. To track disputes worldwide, researchers at Oregon State University spent a decade building a comprehensive database of international exchanges—-both conflicts and alliances—over shared water resources. They found that countries often begin disputes belligerently but ultimately reach peaceful agreements. Says Aaron Wolf, the geographer who leads the project, “For me the really interesting part is how even Arabs and Israelis, Indians and Pakistanis, are able to resolve their differences and find a solution.”


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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 20, 2014 2:50 PM

Questões políticas... 

J. Mark Schwanz's curator insight, June 21, 2014 11:01 AM

Add water to geography education curriculum? You better believe it. The crisis of the 21st century is and will be water.  

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 11:36 AM

summer reading KQ2: How have humans altered the Earth's environment?  Water Security

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Global Oil Reserves

Global Oil Reserves | Geography in the news | Scoop.it

Who has the oil? http://pic.twitter.com/7Njc7OD8rw


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Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, April 1, 12:19 AM

Natural resources are not evenly distributed...this distribution pattern impacts global economics, industrialization, development and politics tremendously.  


Tags: industry, economic, energy, resources.

Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, April 1, 7:35 PM

Natural resources are not evenly distributed...this distribution pattern impacts global economics, industrialization, development and politics tremendously.  


Tags: industry, economic, energy, resources.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:17 AM

Natural resources are not evenly distributed...this distribution pattern impacts global economics, industrialization, development and politics tremendously.  


Tags: industry, economic, energy, resources.

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World's most expensive city revealed

World's most expensive city revealed | Geography in the news | Scoop.it
Singapore is the world's most expensive city to live in, a report by the Economist Intelligence Unit suggests.
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Siberia permafrost thaw warning

Siberia permafrost thaw warning | Geography in the news | Scoop.it
Evidence from Siberian caves suggests that a global temperature rise of 1.5C could see permafrost thaw over a large area of Siberia.
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Neal Lineback

Neal Lineback | Geography in the news | Scoop.it
Neal Lineback has written weekly Geography in the News (GITN) articles for more than 25 years (1,200 published articles) while he was Chair of Geography and Planning at Appalachian State University...
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Islands 'grow back' after typhoon

Islands 'grow back' after typhoon | Geography in the news | Scoop.it
A string of Pacific islands apparently "grow back" after they were devastated by a typhoon a century ago.
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Java airports reopen after eruption

Java airports reopen after eruption | Geography in the news | Scoop.it
Several airports reopen on the Indonesian island of Java after being forced to close following the massive eruption of Mount Kelud.
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The never-ending floods

The wettest January for a hundred years, the Army deployed to Somerset – can anything be done?
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Karma of the Crowd - Map: Instant Megacity

Karma of the Crowd - Map: Instant Megacity | Geography in the news | Scoop.it
The Kumbh Mela in Allahabad hosts many millions of pilgrims over a roughly eight-week period. To serve this massive influx, the religious festival must provide all the food, health care, and basic amenities of a major urban center. Construction on the floodplain can’t get under way until November, after the waters have receded from the previous year’s monsoon. Organizers have just two months to build the temporary megacity before the first inhabitants arrive in January.
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Charting culture

"This animation distils hundreds of years of culture into just five minutes. A team of historians and scientists wanted to map cultural mobility, so they tracked the births and deaths of notable individuals like David, King of Israel, and Leonardo da Vinci, from 600 BC to the present day. Using them as a proxy for skills and ideas, their map reveals intellectual hotspots and tracks how empires rise and crumble. The information comes from Freebase, a Google-owned database of well-known people and places, and other catalogues of notable individuals. The team is based at the University of Texas at Dallas."


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wereldvak's curator insight, August 13, 2014 10:00 AM

Geografische concepten als stedelijke ontwikkeling en diffusie patronen worden zichtbaar. Primate city en rank-size rule.....en demografische veranderingen in gebeiden.

Stran smith's curator insight, August 27, 2014 9:25 PM

Hi it's one of your students try to guess who it is��

Emily Coats's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:27 AM

CULTURAL UNIT

This amazing youtube video is something we watched in class, and is such a great animation. This video charts hundreds of years of cultural diffusion in a mere five minutes. You can see empires rise and crumple, people die and become born, as well as many other significant dates. This applies to the diffusion patterns of culture, because we can see where people and cultures are going throughout the centuries. 

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Changes on the Cape Cod Coastline

Changes on the Cape Cod Coastline | Geography in the news | Scoop.it
Beaches are dynamic, living landscapes. The coast off of Chatham, Massachusetts, provides a prime example of beach evolution.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 5, 2014 11:52 PM

To quote coastal geologist Robert Oldale, "Many people view coastal erosion as a problem that needs to be addressed and, if possible, prevented.  However, storm and wave erosion along the shore of Cape Cod has been going on for thousands of years and will likely continue for thousands of years more. It is a natural process that allows the Cape to adjust to rising sea level. Erosion is only a peril to property. If we build on the shore, we must accept the fact that sooner or later coastal erosion will take the property away.”


Tagscoastal, remote sensing, mappingerosion, landscape.

Miroslav Sopko's curator insight, June 7, 2014 1:16 PM
Všetko sa mení...
Sam Burden's curator insight, June 16, 2014 7:40 AM

The NASA Earth Observatory is a teaching tool used to assist educators in teaching students about the environmental, including natural hazards with visualizations depicting the date and time these vast changes in the climate occurs. There are multiple global maps which  depict data over a period of time which can be used as a tool to see the effects of global warming it’s the implications on the environment on a global scale. Animations, videos and side by side images are also available to teachers to show how sustainable choices or designs can influence our environment. I really enjoyed looking at all of the real-world images on this site and it opened my eyes to how creating a more sustainable environment could influence our world on a global scale. 

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Water-Thirsty-Energy-Infographic-FULL-Vertical-900.jpg (900x6407 pixels)

Water-Thirsty-Energy-Infographic-FULL-Vertical-900.jpg (900x6407 pixels) | Geography in the news | Scoop.it
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How do Singapore's poor families get by?

How do Singapore's poor families get by? | Geography in the news | Scoop.it
Low-income families in Singapore are finding it tough to survive, even though the city-state is one of the world's wealthiest, reports the BBC's Sharanjit Leyl.
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From bean to bar: Why chocolate will never taste the same again

From bean to bar: Why chocolate will never taste the same again | Geography in the news | Scoop.it
It's cocoa season across the southern half of the Ivory Coast. The pods are ripe for picking, some turning from green to yellow, like bananas.
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4.1 magnitude earthquake felt across South-West Britain

4.1 magnitude earthquake felt across South-West Britain | Geography in the news | Scoop.it
There has been an earthquake in the Bristol Channel measuring 4.1 magnitude, the British Geological Survey has confirmed. The quake was felt by people living in parts of Swansea and Devon.
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Which country gets the most tourists?

Which country gets the most tourists? | Geography in the news | Scoop.it
Which is the most visited country in the world, and how much do tourists spend there?
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This Awesome Interactive Map Will Make You Think Twice About Africa

This Awesome Interactive Map Will Make You Think Twice About Africa | Geography in the news | Scoop.it
They say a picture is worth a thousand words. This graph is worth as many as you can take out of it.
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40 more maps that explain the world

40 more maps that explain the world | Geography in the news | Scoop.it
I've searched wide and far for maps that can reveal and surprise and inform in ways that the daily headlines might not.
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MAP: What Every Country Leads The World In

MAP: What Every Country Leads The World In | Geography in the news | Scoop.it
A wonderful map created by William Samari, Ray Yamartino, and Rafaan Anvari of DogHouseDiares illustrates what every country does better than every other country.
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