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BRIC Language Systems to Transform Business Translation Industry - EIN News

BRIC Language Systems to Transform Business Translation Industry - EIN News | Geography in the news | Scoop.it

BRIC Language Systems to Transform Business Translation Industry. Press release distribution provided by EIN News


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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, March 15, 2014 1:23 AM
BRIC Language Systems to Transform Business Translation Industry. Press release distribution provided by EIN News
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Asian elephants depend on shifting cultivation during the dry season

Asian elephants depend on shifting cultivation during the dry season | Geography in the news | Scoop.it
Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) have co-existed with human practices for thousands of years, including shifting cultivation.

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10x10 Initiates A Global Action Campaign Promoting The Education Of Girls

10x10 Initiates A Global Action Campaign Promoting The Education Of Girls | Geography in the news | Scoop.it
This week marks the launch 10x10 Girl Rising, a global action campaign that’s all about bringing education to girls living in developing nations.

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Focus will be on homesteads, infastructure in 2014 - Museveni

Focus will be on homesteads, infastructure in 2014 - Museveni | Geography in the news | Scoop.it
President Yoweri Museveni has said increased tax collections will enable Uganda to focus on infrastructure developlment in 2014.

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Disputed Isles

Disputed Isles | Geography in the news | Scoop.it

Competing territorial claims have led to maritime disputes off the coast of Asia. See a map of the islands at issue.

 

This is an nice interactive map that allows the reader to explore current geopolitical conflicts that are about controlling islands.  This is an good source to use when introducing Exclusive Economic Zones, which is often the key strategic importance of small, lightly populated islands.   

 

Tags: EastAsia, SouthEastAsia, political, unit 4 political, territoriality, autonomy, conflict, economic. 


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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2014 2:40 PM

This interactive page gives relevant information about islands that are disputed over in southeast Asia.  I liked it because you could see the information in context with the map.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:47 PM

This is like a game of Monopoly when people try and get all the houses or businesses. Except this is real life and real isles. Whose is whose? How does Asia decide where and how the EEZ's should be divided.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:05 PM

considering that half of the nations involved are island nations, this is hardly surprising. every nation has issues with their neighbors. even the us and Canada dispute some territory. but these disputes can hardly end as well, when half of these nations have fought wars with each other for most of their histories.

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Where Are Retirees Moving? Texas

Where Are Retirees Moving? Texas | Geography in the news | Scoop.it

These days Americans are moving to cities around the country when they retire. The most popular destinations now include Phoenix, Atlanta, Las Vegas, and Dallas, fast-growing metros in the Sunbelt.

 

Shifting mobility patterns matter because retirees help magnet cities prosper. Americans who relocate when their careers end are generally wealthier and healthier than those who stay put.

 

Their home purchases and other spending invigorate the local housing market and broader economy. They pay local property and sales taxes but don’t use many government services, at least in the short-run before they need long-term care. Many retirees serve their communities by volunteering at local nonprofits.

 

It seems likely that the competition will heat up as the wave of retiring boomers intensifies. Texas is the top state for population increase from migration offering both jobs and sunshine.


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Christian group claims teaching science promotes ‘atheistic’ worldview for Kansas students

Christian group claims teaching science promotes ‘atheistic’ worldview for Kansas students | Geography in the news | Scoop.it
A religious group has filed suit against the Kansas Board of Education seeking to stop educators from adopting global warming and evolution into the state curriculum.

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For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price'

For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price' | Geography in the news | Scoop.it

"China's one-child only policy and historic preference for boys has led to a surplus of marriageable Chinese men. Young women are holding out for better apartments, cars and the like from potential spouses...30 to 48 percent of the real estate appreciation in 35 major Chinese cities is directly linked to a man's need to acquire wealth — in the form of property — to attract a wife."

 

Tags: gender, folk culture, China, podcast, culture, population.


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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 11, 2014 8:16 PM

I feel as though marriage can be complicated in China due to the one child policy. The amount of males outweigh the females. Therefore, there will not be as many marriages because there are not enough females to go around. Grooms have to put out so much for their brides. For example, in this article, her groom is unable to even get in the room to see her unless he puts up a chunk of money first. This is a typical ordeal for Chinese weddings. People describe it as a negotiation process. He must do whatever is told of him before seeking her hand in marriage. The "bride price" is when the groom gives the brides family a fair amount of money. A typical amount for an ordinary family to give is around $10,000. This is so much to get married and on top of all this, gender roles are typically unbalanced. In order to get married in China, you best make sure your a man ready to fulfill every request of your bride.

Elle Reagan's curator insight, March 22, 2015 5:53 PM

I always heard that men were more desirable in China because they are the ones that carry out the family name and provide for the family. Women, however, are seen as much weaker and are treated as lesser. For the newly wed couple in the article, they hope to have a baby girl because it is much cheaper when she gets married. I never thought of it this way but having a girl would be much cheaper as the parents would not have to pay the "bride price" or for the apartment in which their daughter will be living in. 

Bella Reagan's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:48 AM

Unit 3

Culture

Cultural Practices

Cultural practuces in China are changing, but old customs are staying the dame. An old tradition is still being help up, called the "bride price.;This is a price that men must pay in order to marry. In China the male to female ratio is vey off, with 117 men to every 100 women.

Insight

Women are still being given a price on their head. It's a little different than it is in America.The culture behind the bride price is still going on in China and with China's ways of remembering traditions. China is a very traditional place with cultures following old traditions. The One Child policy, resulting in many males compared to females, and the strong traditions in China all result in why their customs stay for so long. 

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Species Diversity In Coral Reefs Hints At How Coral Responds To Climate Change

Species Diversity In Coral Reefs Hints At How Coral Responds To Climate Change | Geography in the news | Scoop.it
RedOrbit: It is widely known that coral reefs are being put in jeopardy by rising water temperatures caused by climate change.
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Globalization of Fast Food Chains

Globalization of Fast Food Chains | Geography in the news | Scoop.it

           

           This article focuses on the theme of globalization and how it is affecting us more than ever. In the image above there are two world maps both maps are showing where in the world the restaurants can be found and how many locations are in each country; the data is shown by using a proportional symbol map. Below the MacDonald’s map there is a graph that shows the relationship between the major fast-food companies and the money they make. As indicated MacDonald’s is making nearly four times as much more money as its closest competitor. The graph on the bottom right corner of the map shows the growth of Starbucks worldwide from 1987-2003; as you can see the locations grow astronomically starting around 1999. Although Starbucks has 6,600 locations around the world its annual income is only about $4.1 billion dollars whereas MacDonald’s is over 40 billion, just by doing simple math that shows MacDonald’s must around 40,000 locations worldwide. The purpose of this map is to show how massive corporations like fast food chains are linking the world’s population together one country at a time.

 

            This map relates greatly to what I am doing in Human Geography in unit one. Firstly the type of map used is a thematic map, thematic maps are a type of map we focused on in class, specifically these maps are a proportional symbol maps. Proportional symbol maps use symbols of different sizes to represent data associated with different areas or locations within the map. In this case the maps of both Starbucks and MacDonald’s show the worldwide locations of these chains and the amount of stores located in each country. By analyzing the map if you look at the locations of these stores in relation to the map the bulk of stores are located in the more modernized world, with little to no stories located in Africa. This is caused by the extreme poverty in most African countries; fast food chains would be too expensive for most Africans to buy. Also if you look at the relationship between population and the amount of locations in relation to population you can see the two locations with the most stores (the United States and China) have to of the greatest populations in the world. Also this map indicated how the stores have spread through expansion diffusion specifically through hierarchal diffusion throughout the world first traveling to countries with bigger populations. The only downside to this map is in areas like Europe where the countries are so dense it is hard to make out which symbol relates to which country.

 

           This map is a great indication of how the world is becoming more globalized every single day, with a new MacDonald’s and Starbucks opening every day soon if not now every single person in the world will be able to show you where to find either of the fast food chains anywhere in the world.

 

"International Networks Archive / Map of the Month." International Networks Archive / Map of the Month. Geography Education (Scoop It), 03 Oct. 2011. Web. 13 Oct. 2012. <http://www.princeton.edu/~ina/infographics/starbucks.html>.


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Leanne Alexander's curator insight, February 3, 2014 8:33 AM

Year 11. Current examples of globalisation that you can refer to in your exams!

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Writing FRQs

"AP Human Geography Free Response Questions should be approached in a very deliberate and specific way. APHG teacher Tom Landon explains his approach to teaching students how to do it."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 11, 2013 3:10 PM

For those preparing students for the AP Human Geography test, this video gives great advice to help you instruct students on how to approach the Free Response Questions (FRQs).  Understanding the content always comes first, but some bright students who I know understand the content fail to read the instructions or to answer every portion of the questions.  This will help those APHG students.


TagsAPHG, training, geography education.

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The danger of North Korea is no joke

The danger of North Korea is no joke | Geography in the news | Scoop.it
Joshua Stanton and Sung-Yoon Lee say the North Korean regime is murderous to its own people and its danger to the world cannot be ignored.

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The seed and agricultural biotechnology industries in India | Food Policy


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IFPRIKM's curator insight, February 24, 2014 3:46 PM

Since the late 1980s, technological advances and policy reforms have created new opportunities for private-sector investment in India’s seed and agricultural biotechnology industries. These changes have had a significant impact on cotton yields and output in India, but less so for rice and wheat—the country’s main cereal staples—for which yield growth rates are tending toward stagnation. This analysis examines the structures of these industries, their potential effects on competition and innovation, and the policies that may improve both industry performance and the delivery of new productivity-enhancing technologies to India’s cereal production systems. Our findings suggest that more substantive policy reforms are needed to encourage further innovation, reduce regulatory uncertainty, and encourage firm- and industry-level growth, while continued public spending on agricultural research is needed to support technological change.

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The Effects of Gender Discrimination in the Workplace

The Effects of Gender Discrimination in the Workplace | Geography in the news | Scoop.it
According to TNS Research Surveys, 68 percent of women surveyed believe gender discrimination exists in the workplace. Federal law protects women and other minorities from discrimination in the work ...

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Victoria Jackman's curator insight, April 27, 2014 11:05 PM

This shows the complications of women in a workplace.

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The Global Population in 2100

The Global Population in 2100 | Geography in the news | Scoop.it
Solving many of the world’s biggest environmental challenges may have just gotten more difficult.

The Department of Economic and Social Affairs of the UN recently released population data indicating the midline estimate - more than 10.8 billion by 2100 - is 800 million higher than the 2010 prediction.

Today’s rural-to-urban migration will continue in full force, with upwards of 84% of the planet living in cities at the close of the century (compared to 52 % today).

Of course population isn’t the only factor contributing to humans’ planetary impact. Consumption may be equally important when looking at the drivers of environmental change across the Earth. Nevertheless, population will continue to be a major consideration as we work to address issues ranging from energy and food security to water availability, species loss, pollution, urban planning and more in the decades ahead...


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Aleasha Reed's curator insight, September 27, 2013 9:14 AM

By the year 2100 our global population is calculated to reach 10.8 billion. The United States is expected to grow another 150 million by this time. Our population right now is 313.9 million right now. Our big cities will continue to grow, and new ones will arise as the years pass.

M-Christine Lanne's curator insight, November 11, 2013 2:44 AM

La démographie, une donnée déterminante  pour l'évolution du climat et la pression sur les ressources naturelles. Nous finissons hélas par être trop nombreux sur terre pour ce qu'elle peut supporter au rythme actuel...

MissPatel's curator insight, December 17, 2014 2:09 AM

A future to look forward to? Your potential future? Good, bad or ugly? 

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Political Geography Now: Mali Conflict Map: National Territory Reunited Ahead of Elections (#6)

Political Geography Now: Mali Conflict Map: National Territory Reunited Ahead of Elections (#6) | Geography in the news | Scoop.it
Updated map of the situation in Mali as it prepares for elections on July 28, 2013. (Political Geography Now: #Mali Conflict Map: National Territory Reunited Ahe...

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Annual Polar Bear Migration Under Way: How it Works and How Climate Change is Altering It

Annual Polar Bear Migration Under Way: How it Works and How Climate Change is Altering It | Geography in the news | Scoop.it
Annual migration happening in the "polar bear capital of the world."
    

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Silent Plains … The Fading Sounds of Native Languages

Silent Plains … The Fading Sounds of Native Languages | Geography in the news | Scoop.it
‘All things must pass,’ sang George Harrison. With time, suns turn into ice, civilizations into dust, and species go extinct. And so ‘black dwarfs,’ ‘biodiversity loss,’ not to forget ‘Armageddon,’ have all become part of our daily alphabet.

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Matthew Wahl's curator insight, March 2, 2013 7:43 PM

In the Continental United States, Native langues are being lost at an alarming rate. With globalization and development, linguistic diversity and ultimately culture can be lost. A number of less-developed places with the highest ecological diversity, such as Papua New Guinea, have the highest linguistic diversity as well.

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Revolution, turmoil impact on Egypt's pop culture - Ahram Online

Revolution, turmoil impact on Egypt's pop culture - Ahram Online | Geography in the news | Scoop.it
Revolution, turmoil impact on Egypt's pop culture Ahram Online Graffiti has emerged as a new and popular art form, putting politics on city walls and chronicling the mood on the "revolutionary street." Popular music has become dominated by young...

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Fingerprints of Arctic Warming Seen Throughout Region

Fingerprints of Arctic Warming Seen Throughout Region | Geography in the news | Scoop.it
Climate Central: The Arctic may not have smashed records for sea ice loss and land-based ice melt in 2013, but the region is still clearly undergoing rapid changes as a result of manmade global warming, scientists reported Thursday.
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"80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks"

"80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks" | Geography in the news | Scoop.it

        Presenting the results of recent population research, “80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks” verifies that 80% of America’s population does indeed live 20 miles from a Frappuccino. James Davenport used Starbucks locational data for the United States in conjunction with a real estate computer mapping program, and then triangulated to create a map of Starbucks clusters around the country. Students at the University of Washington then created different-sized radii around the locations, and calculated the population percentage living within the radii to discover this interesting reality.

       The fact that so many live in the vicinity of Starbucks locations is actually quite predictable considering the nature of hierarchical diffusion. Hierarchical diffusion involves the diffusion (spreading of something over space and time) of a phenomenon firstly to the biggest cities and then to progressively smaller and less populated areas, to those at the bottom of the social hiearchy. This is a type of expansion diffusion, but with specific properties (those described above), meaning that when Starbucks shops move across the country, they still remain in their original locations. The distance decay effect, where places farther away are less likely to be impacted, does not exist in the Starbucks case, as the company will install themselves wherever there are high numbers of customers with money. It is no wonder that so many reside near a Starbucks becase the corporation has purposely established their locations in the most densely populated areas to maximize revenue and profit. 

        The interpolated dot map above shows that the highest concentrations of Starbucks locations are found in large cities (near New York, San Francisco, etc.), which is a common characteristic of anything that has diffused hierarchically. Before our very eyes, the ubiquity of Starbucks is becoming a reality: and it makes for a perfect example of hiearchial diffusion in the modern world.

 

(Dai, Serena. The Atlantic Wire. October 4th, 2012. October 8th, 2012.)


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