Geography in the classroom
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Geography in the classroom
Resources to support the NSW secondary Geography curriculum
Curated by dilaycock
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Can you name these countries using only satellite photos?

Can you name these countries using only satellite photos? | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
The view from above.
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Fun and interesting way to start a conversation about what is geography.

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Rising seas pose a cultural threat to Australia's 'forgotten people'

Rising seas pose a cultural threat to Australia's 'forgotten people' | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
While you may have heard about the increasing threat that climate change and rising seas pose to Pacific islands — already forcing some communities to move — Australia has its own group of islands that…
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Urbanisation brings animals and diseases closer to home

Urbanisation brings animals and diseases closer to home | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Our world is becoming increasingly urbanised. In 1950, just 30% of the world’s population lived in urban areas. This number is now over 50% and rising. By 2050, two-thirds of the world’s population are…
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Tiny satellites show us the Earth as it changes in near-real-time

Tiny satellites show us the Earth as it changes in near-real-time | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Satellite imaging has revolutionized our knowledge of the Earth, with detailed images of nearly every street corner readily available online. But Planet Labs' Will Marshall says we can do better and go faster — by getting smaller. He introduces his tiny satellites — no bigger than 10 by 10 by 30 centimeters — that, when launched in a cluster, provide high-res images of the entire planet, updated daily.
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Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 26, 2014 1:39 PM

YOU are being watched!

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Will Gold Coast 'oasis' resort and cruise hub get green light?

Will Gold Coast 'oasis' resort and cruise hub get green light? | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
The largest piece of integrated tourism infrastructure in Queensland's history could be just weeks away from getting the green light.
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Providing the toilets people want will help Clean India's campaign

Providing the toilets people want will help Clean India's campaign | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Indian prime minister Narendra Modi has wowed audiences in Australia during his recent visit and used the occasion to remind people of his plan to provide a toilet at home for all Indians by 2019. The…
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Imagine life without a proper toilet: that's the reality for 1 in 3 people

Imagine life without a proper toilet: that's the reality for 1 in 3 people | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
It’s 2014. So why do we still need World Toilet Day? Because 2.5 billion people still need one. World Toilet Day remains a critical means to raise awareness globally about one of the many important things…
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Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 24, 2015 1:10 AM

This article made me appreciate the fact that I have a toilet. Although I know that many people in world do not have toilets, I did not know the extent of the problems caused by the lack of toilets. It's sad to know that so many children are dying everyday from preventable illnesses that people in developed countries hardly know anyone can die from. I think a lot of the problems of lack of sanitation is caused by corrupt governments and inefficient international action. Although these supranational organizations give money to these poor countries to aid them in creating better sanitation systems, the corrupt governments in these countries use the money not on their own people, leaving the people to suffer more. What makes the problem worse is the fact that many of these countries without sanitation systems face the largest population booms, which worsens the issue of sanitation even more. 

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Global Fishing Watch

Global Fishing Watch | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Global Fishing Watch is the product of a technology partnership between SkyTruth, Oceana, and Google that is designed to show all of the trackable fishing activity in the ocean. This interactive web tool – currently in prototype stage – is being built to enable anyone to visualize the global fishing fleet in space and time. Global Fishing Watch will reveal the intensity of fishing effort around the world, one of the stressors contributing to the precipitous decline of our fisheries.
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Retraction: why we removed an article about stationery and deforestation

Retraction: why we removed an article about stationery and deforestation | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Today we removed an article called “Over-logging in the Sumatran forest? Blame your diary” after becoming aware of a significant…
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Here's the reason the said article has been removed.

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How plywood started the destruction of Indonesia’s forests

How plywood started the destruction of Indonesia’s forests | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
How do the products we buy affect the world’s rainforests? In the lead up to the Asia-Pacific Rainforest Summit held in Sydney this week, The Conversation is running a series on rainforest commodities…
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Urbanisation Up Close - Speaking of Medicine

Urbanisation Up Close - Speaking of Medicine | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Jocalyn Clark @jocalynclark discusses the urbanisation of the world’s population and its impact on global health. Image credit: joiseyshowaa, Flickr Undeni
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Explaining Rare 'Hole Punch' Cloud With Rainbow in the Middle

Explaining Rare 'Hole Punch' Cloud With Rainbow in the Middle | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

Clouds are made of water droplets, and hole punch clouds—also known as fallstreak hole clouds—occur when part of that cloud falls out, leaving behind a hole. That opening in the cloud is the result of an extremely localized snowfall.

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Where's that bean been? Coffee's journey from crop to cafe

Where's that bean been? Coffee's journey from crop to cafe | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Welcome to the third instalment in our series Chemistry of Coffee, where we unravel the delicious secrets of one of the most widely consumed drinks in the world. As you listen to the whirring grinders…
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Fewer trees leave the outer suburbs out in the heat

Fewer trees leave the outer suburbs out in the heat | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
When you look out of your window in the morning, how many trees do you see? Your answer might depend on what suburb you live in. As you go further from the city centre, the amount of tree cover in a suburb…
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Go with the grain: technology to help farmers protect crops

Go with the grain: technology to help farmers protect crops | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
New technology to tackle biosecurity challenges down the track is one of the five megatrends identified in today’s CSIRO report Australia’s Biosecurity Future: preparing for future biological challenges…
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The changing shape of world demographics

Animating the changing shape of the world population pyramid. For more multimedia content from The Economist visit our website: http://econ.st/1xqEZhX.


Via Seth Dixon
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Bex Swaney's curator insight, December 5, 2014 12:27 PM

Growth of the ageing population, population change as a whole

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 10:47 AM

unit 2

Deanna Metz's curator insight, March 1, 8:05 PM

This is an incredibly powerful and remarkably well-done video by the Economist (see related article here) that is reminiscent of a TED-ED lesson on the importance and value of population pyramids.  This video goes nicely with this article from the World Bank entitled "The End of the Population Pyramid" which highlights the demographic changes that will be reshaping global demographics in the next 50-100 years.  


Tag: population, declining population, demographic transition model, video, APHG.

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Black Saturday | Australian Broadcasting Corporation - /stories/mosaic

Black Saturday | Australian Broadcasting Corporation - /stories/mosaic | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
On February 7, 2009 Victoria had the worst bushfires in the nation's recorded history. Black Saturday, claimed 173 human lives and destroyed 2029 homes. This website offers a collection of the most compelling and significant stories of the fires and the aftermath, placing them alongside contextual information about key events. This is an interactive story of Black Saturday.
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Watch Reinventing Beijing Online | smh.tv

A spike in international attention around the 2008 Olympics saw the Chinese capital become an experimental laboratory for architects from around the world. But with the visionary new buildings came a rising disquiet from residents who saw the city’s rich history all but destroyed.
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Living Geography: Australian Bushfire Resource

Living Geography: Australian Bushfire Resource | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 14, 3:12 AM
A great teacher resource - needs to be adapted for primary level students
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Dubai dubbed “capital of the green economy” in new report

Dubai dubbed “capital of the green economy” in new report | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
The Dubai Carbon Center of Excellence has just released the State of green economy report 2015, a UN-backed publication which analyzes achievements and challenges for the green economy in the current market.
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Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 19, 2014 12:30 PM

Not only is Dubai one of the richest cities in the world but now they are the capital of the green economy. The Dubai Electricity and Water Authority and Dubai Supreme Council of Energy are the two main reasons for this.  The Dubai supreme council of energy aims to support Dubai’s economic growth through secure energy supply & efficient energy use while meeting environmental & sustainability objectives.  They want to rationalize use of energy and ensure environmental sustainability. The UAE says that developed countries have a sort of debt to pay for the environment so they want to take the lead on the low carbon approach using the UAE vision 2021, which primarily focuses on reducing the nation’s dependence on fossil fuels while increasing the use and development of renewable energy. They plan to reduce total energy consumption in the nation by 30% in 2030 by making solar power at least 5% of its energy use. This city knows how to plan ahead.

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Marine parks for fish and people: here's how to do it

Marine parks for fish and people: here's how to do it | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
As thousands gather for the World Parks Congress in Sydney, there are growing calls for a new marine park in Sydney Harbour. New South Wales’s Labor opposition has promised, if elected, to establish the…
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Palm oil continues to destroy Indonesia's wildlife

Palm oil continues to destroy Indonesia's wildlife | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
How do the products we buy affect the world’s rainforests? In the lead up to the Asia-Pacific Rainforest Summit held in Sydney this week, The Conversation is running a series on rainforest commodities…
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What’s the deal with Antarctica and the Arctic?

What’s the deal with Antarctica and the Arctic? | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"Perhaps the biggest misunderstanding is that the Arctic and Antarctic are similar. One’s in the north and the other is in the south; but other than that, they’re the same, right? No, this couldn’t be more wrong. These polar opposites are literally polar opposites.
For starters, the Arctic is a small, shallow ocean surrounded by land: Eurasia, Greenland, Canada and the United States. It’s only about 5 ½ million square miles, which is five times smaller than the Atlantic and 11 times smaller than the Pacific. Antarctica, on the other hand, is a continent surrounded by the entire Southern Ocean.

This may seem like no big deal, but it makes all the difference in the world. It takes a lot of energy to change water temperature compared to what it takes to change land temperature, which means Arctic seawater isn’t as cold as the continental ice sheet covering Antarctica. So, the Arctic sea ice (frozen sea water) is about 10 feet thick, whereas the Antarctic ice sheet (compacted freshwater ice) is over a mile thick."

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, Arctic, Antarctica.


Via Seth Dixon
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Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, November 12, 2014 9:05 PM

It would be nice to keep both

Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, November 17, 2014 2:51 PM

If we are

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Family planning drive reaches millions of women and girls

Family planning drive reaches millions of women and girls | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
But report warns population growth could outpace family planning programmes in some countries despite range of contraception initiatives
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How to Interpret a Satellite Image: Five Tips and Strategies

How to Interpret a Satellite Image: Five Tips and Strategies | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
What do you do when presented with a new satellite image? Here's what the Earth Observatory team does to understand the view.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 3, 2014 9:30 AM

Aerial photography can be quite beautiful, as can satellite imagery. These are more than just pretty pictures; interpreting aerial photography and satellite imagery is not easy; here is a great article that gives an introduction on how to interpret satellite imagery. With a little training, satellite images become rich data sources (instead of some visually meaningless data).  Using Stratocam, you can explore and tag some of the amazing place on Earth. 


Tags: mapping, perspective, remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 Geoprinciples.


Sharrock's curator insight, November 3, 2014 12:05 PM

Seth Dixon's insight:

Aerial photography can be quite beautiful, as cansatellite imagery. These are more than just pretty pictures; interpreting aerial photography and satellite imagery is not easy; here is a great article that gives an introduction on how to interpret satellite imagery. With a little training, satellite images become rich data sources (instead of some visually meaningless data).  Using Stratocam, you can explore and tag some of the amazing place on Earth. 

 

 

Tags: mapping, perspective, remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 Geoprinciples.

 

Michael Meller's curator insight, November 3, 2014 11:34 PM

Cool