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Drying of the Aral Sea

Explore a global timelapse of our planet, constructed from Landsat satellite imagery. With water diverted to irrigation, the inland Aral Sea has shrunk drama...

Via Seth Dixon
dilaycock's insight:

Great example of desertification.

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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, October 7, 11:27 AM

The Aral Sea’s receding waters could prove fatal to the surrounding agriculture. Both Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan diverted the rivers that flowed into the Sea in the 1960s to feed their growing cotton and rice farms. Over the last five decades, the lack of a water source flowing into the Aral Sea combined with harsher droughts due to climate change have caused the water to evaporate at an alarming rate. As the water evaporates, large deposits of minerals remain on the bare lake bed. Winds pick up the mineral deposits and often spread them onto farms, where the increased salinity destroys rice paddies and other crops. The destruction of crops causes less food production, so less money is made by the farmers and more money has to be spent to bring in food to avoid famine. Cotton crops are also destroyed, so the region loses yet another source of income.

The increased evaporation of the Aral Sea has also caused an incredible increase to salinity levels in the lake itself. The extremely salty water cannot be used without heavy removing the salt, which is incredibly unaffordable in an already stressed region. Small subsidence farmers and local farmers cannot use the resource at hand. The fishing industry has completely collapsed, thus removing another important resource from the area.

If a wounded economy and unreliable food was not enough, the air born minerals blown away from the lake are causing numerous health problems. Respiratory issues, such as asthma, are becoming more and more common in the communities surrounding the Aral Sea due to the minerals and industrial debris in the air. The disappearance of the Sea has created the perfect conditions for the collapse of a region. The struggle that the people have to endure often escalates into increased social and political unrest, and disputes often occur. The Aral Sea exemplifies how one small environmental change can set off a chain of devastating events that lead to irreversible effects.

               

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 19, 8:19 PM

The drying of the Aral Sea opens our eyes to how fragile our environment is and the scarcity of resources.  We need to become more aware of our resources, because as they saying goes, the "well will run dry."

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 22, 2:33 PM

This video shows a time lapse of the Aral Sea's near demise. A once viable fishing area this salt lake now resembles a desert. The Aral Sea is comprised of salt water however much of the water being funneled in was fresh. Through human tampering this body of water has nearly dried. Some areas have been "saved" through damming and heavy rain fall although it may be too late for the southern end of the Aral Sea.

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Geography in the classroom
Resources to support the NSW secondary Geography curriculum
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Can we feed a world of 12 billion people?

Can we feed a world of 12 billion people? | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
The world's population could hit 12 billion people by 2100, but can we feed them?
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‘Population growth far outpaces food supply’ in conflict-ravaged Sahel

‘Population growth far outpaces food supply’ in conflict-ravaged Sahel | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Researchers say conflict and climate change mean the region’s resources will be unable to sustain the increasing population
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Back to Everest in 2015?

Back to Everest in 2015? | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Six months after killer avalanche, mountaineering community assesses next year's climbing season
dilaycock's insight:

Focuses on the effects of the 2014 avalanche on the Sherpa community.

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What is the greatest threat to the world? Depends on where you live

What is the greatest threat to the world? Depends on where you live | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Prior to the most recent Ebola outbreak in the western parts of the continent, a median of 32% across the seven African nations polled feared infectious disease as the top danger. In the Middle East, the top danger is ethnic and religious hatred.
dilaycock's insight:

via Latty Ferlazzo http://larryferlazzo.edublogs.org/

Australia wasn't one of the 44 countries surveyed. 

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Your life on earth

Your life on earth | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
How you and the world have changed since you were born
dilaycock's insight:

"Find out how, since the date of your birth, your life has progressed; including how many times your heart has beaten, and how far you have travelled through space.

Investigate how the world around you has changed since you've been alive; from the amount the sea has risen, and the tectonic plates have moved, to the number of earthquakes and volcanoes that have erupted.

Grasp the impact we've had on the planet in your lifetime; from how much fuel and food we've used to the species we've discovered and endangered".

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Feeding the Whole World

"Louise Fresco argues that a smart approach to large-scale, industrial farming and food production will feed our planet's incoming population of nine billion. Only foods like (the scorned) supermarket white bread, she says, will nourish on a global scale."


Via Seth Dixon
dilaycock's insight:

Fresco argues that we tend to see "home-made" agriculture as a thing of beauty, whereas the reality is that many small scale farmers struggle and live a subsistence lifestyle. The adoration of small-scale farming, notes Fresco, is a luxury to those who can afford it. Large-scale production has increased the availability and affordability of food. Food production should be given as high a priority as climate change and sustainability, and we should seriously consider ways in which land can be used as a multi-purpose space that includes agriculture.

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AckerbauHalle's curator insight, October 19, 7:18 AM

Sehr interessanter Beitrag von Louise Fresco zur Problematik des Welthungers. 

Marianne Naughton's curator insight, October 19, 12:07 PM

Feed The World ...

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, October 24, 10:55 AM

Louise Fresco speaks of local food production and small scale control

and the entire food nework

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World Food Day: 10 myths about hunger

World Food Day: 10 myths about hunger | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
How much do you know about global hunger? Carla Kweifio-Okai take a look at some of the biggest food production and nutrition myths
dilaycock's insight:

Play the interactive food game.

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World Food Day

World Food Day | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
The 2014 World Food Day theme - Family Farming: “Feeding the world, caring for the earth” - has been chosen to raise the profile of family farming and smallholder farmers. It focuses world attention on the significant role of family farming in eradicating hunger and poverty, providing food security and nutrition, improving livelihoods, managing natural resources, protecting the environment, and achieving sustainable development, in particular in rural areas.
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Endangered Orangutans Gain From Eco-Friendly Shifts in Palm Oil Market

Endangered Orangutans Gain From Eco-Friendly Shifts in Palm Oil Market | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Oil palm plantations are a major threat to orangutans, but new initiatives for deforestation-free palm oil may help save them.
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Custom Google Maps: A Great Digital Engagement Tool

Custom Google Maps: A Great Digital Engagement Tool | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

Custom Google Maps can be used in a variety of ways to produce numerous benefits for organizations, their members, and other key stakeholders. This article provides examples, enumerates some of the key features, and provides resources and basic development tips. Additional suggestions, as well as questions, are welcome.

dilaycock's insight:

While this article is aimed at the business end, it has potential for the classroom.

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Soldiers, servants and farmhands: 10% of world’s children forced to work

Soldiers, servants and farmhands: 10% of world’s children forced to work | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Children fighting in armies or working as servants, but US labour department report says progress is being made
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Do-It-Yourself Urban Design – New Research | Greater Places

Do-It-Yourself Urban Design – New Research | Greater Places | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
dilaycock's insight:

Some great examples to consider in a discussion of the role of people power in urban development.

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Incredible photos show mountains of plastic bottles washed in Maldives

Incredible photos show mountains of plastic bottles washed in Maldives | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Award-winning filmmaker Alison Teal, 27, from Hawaii, visited Thilafushi – or Trash Island - an artificial island created as a municipal landfill situated to the west of Malé. 

Via Kathy Dowsett
dilaycock's insight:

Oh wow. Such a disjuncture between what we imagine and the reality. I'm in a school where many of the students are beach-goers and surfers. These images should make them angry and get them thinking (and hopefully, acting).

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Uniterre Conférences's curator insight, October 1, 8:51 PM

Photos prises aux maldives

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 2, 6:17 PM

Option topic:  Marine Environments and management 

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30 Striking Satellite Images That Will Change The Way You See The Earth

30 Striking Satellite Images That Will Change The Way You See The Earth | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Satellite imagery can be put to many good uses, from military and meteorology, to biology and geological.
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Matt Davidson's curator insight, October 23, 10:29 PM

Wonderful satellite images

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Amazon deforestation picking up pace, satellite data reveals

Amazon deforestation picking up pace, satellite data reveals | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Data indicates 190% rise in land clearance in August and September compared with same period last year
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Student Movements: A Subject of Human Geography

Student Movements: A Subject of Human Geography | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
By Sim Tack As student protests in Hong Kong continue, memories of the 1989 Tiananmen Square demonstrations naturally spring to mind. Less iconic but no less notable were the Hungarian Revolution of 1956, which began as a student movement; the 2007 Venezuelan protests, which started with a group of students demanding [...]
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Google Earth Engine

Google Earth Engine | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Google Earth Engine brings together the world's satellite imagery — trillions of scientific measurements dating back over 40 years — and makes it available online with tools for scientists, independent researchers, and nations to mine this massive warehouse of data to detect changes, map trends and quantify differences on the Earth's surface. Applications include: detecting deforestation, classifying land cover, estimating forest biomass and carbon, and mapping the world’s roadless areas.
dilaycock's insight:

Featured sites include: Growth of Las Vegas, Wyoming Coal Mining, Saudi Arabia irrigation, Amazon deforestation, Dubai coastal expansion, Drying of the Aral Sea and Lake Urmia.

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How A 'Small But Mighty' Team Of Googlers Is Using Maps To Save People And The Planet

How A 'Small But Mighty' Team Of Googlers Is Using Maps To Save People And The Planet | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
It’s 2008 and five Google employees are in the Brazilian rainforest.
dilaycock's insight:

Great example of organisations working with indigenous peoples.

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1,000 cars and no garage – why car-sharing works

1,000 cars and no garage – why car-sharing works | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Owning a car can be a hassle, especially if you live somewhere where driving is an occasional, rather than daily, necessity. This might help to explain why car-sharing schemes are going from strength to…
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National Geographic Future of Food Series

National Geographic Future of Food Series | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
In our rapidly changing, globalized world, we all need to understand how food has made us who we are today and how it shapes our future. Starting with the May issue of National Geographic magazine and continuing through 2014, National Geographic explores our complex relationship with what we eat and where our food comes from.
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To have sustainable development, we need to consider culture

To have sustainable development, we need to consider culture | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
At the end of July draft Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) were released by the United Nations-appointed Open Working Group. Those of us hoping to see culture identified as part of those goals were…
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Sydney house prices push families north to Queensland

Sydney house prices push families north to Queensland | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
As Sydney house prices skyrocket and traffic congestion worsens, some enterprising workers are moving north to seek the lifestyle they want in Queensland while continuing their careers in NSW.
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gina lockton's curator insight, October 16, 8:44 PM

THis is good article looking at home affordability for SHELTER

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Wanderlust and the environment: can we afford to keep traveling?

Wanderlust and the environment: can we afford to keep traveling? | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Tourism comes with a high environmental cost. But it’s hard to give up the experience of seeing the world. What might travel look like in the future?
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Smelly, contaminated, full of disease: the world’s open dumps are growing

Smelly, contaminated, full of disease: the world’s open dumps are growing | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Almost 40% of the world’s waste ends up in huge rubbish tips, mostly found near urban populations in poor countries, posing a serious threat to human health and the environment. John Vidal reports
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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 9, 4:18 PM

Consequences of urbanisation in developing countries 

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 21, 11:27 PM

Option topic: Urban environmental change and management

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World’s Largest Dam Removal Unleashes U.S. River After Century of Electric Production

World’s Largest Dam Removal Unleashes U.S. River After Century of Electric Production | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
The last section of dam is being blasted from the Elwha River on Washington's Olympic Peninsula on Tuesday.


For almost half a century, the two dams were widely applauded for powering the growth of the peninsula and its primary industry. But the dams blocked salmon migration up the Elwha, devastating its fish and shellfish—and the livelihood of the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe. As the tribe slowly gained political power—it won federal recognition in 1968—it and other tribes began to protest the loss of the fishing rights promised to them by federal treaty in the mid-1800s. In 1979, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Washington tribes, including the Elwha Klallam, were entitled to half the salmon catch in the state.


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 9, 1:16 PM

See also this video to see the rapid changes on the nearby White Salmon River when they removed the dam. 


Tags: biogeography, environment, land use, sustainability, environment adapt.