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Geography in the classroom
Resources to support the NSW secondary Geography curriculum
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This Is What Gentrification Really Is

This Is What Gentrification Really Is | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
In many cities, it's become popular to hate "gentrifiers," rich people who move in and drive up housing prices -- pushing everyone else out. But what's going on in these rapidly-changing urban spaces is a lot more complicated than that.
dilaycock's insight:

Via Seth Dixon. Interesting discussion with examples from around the world of the factors that might drive and shape gentrification.

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Sydney among the Western world's worst cities for traffic congestion, report reveals

Sydney among the Western world's worst cities for traffic congestion, report reveals | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Sydneysiders stuck in peak-hour traffic this afternoon will have plenty of time to ponder this: the city has been ranked as the seventh worst in the world for road congestion, sitting just behind the traffic snarl that is Los Angeles.
dilaycock's insight:

The traffic problems in Sydney are far less during school holidays. Has anyone considered that changing school hours might relieve traffic congestion/chaos?

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 2, 3:45 PM

Consequences of urbanisation


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With 25 million people, Delhi is facing urbanisation crisis

With 25 million people, Delhi is facing urbanisation crisis | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Cities like Delhi cannot accommodate so many people and are not developing fast enough
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Tracking Detroit's Decay Through Google Street View

Though it's easy to crack jokes about Detroit's downfall from afar, it doesn't change the fact that there are very real people forced to look on as the place they call home slowly descends into decay. One of the most poignant depictions of this has come from none other than Google Maps.
dilaycock's insight:

Google Street view records urban decay in Detroit. Thanks to Lisa brennan @ Barker College for this Scoop.

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Primate Cities: Mexico City

http://geographyeducation.org/2014/05/05/primate-cities-mexico-city/


Via Seth Dixon
dilaycock's insight:

Seth Dixon, creator of this excellent resource, notes, "I put together this presentation, based primarily on my time researching in Mexico City (download the PPT file to access my notes for each slide).  The problems with primate cities are hardly unique to Mexico City; this additional BBC article bemoans Britain’s lack of a true second city, arguing that London’s shadow looms too large for sustained national development outside of the primate city."

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 5, 7:19 AM

In 2011, one of the AP Human Geography Free Response Questions focused on identifying if the rank-size rule applied the urban hierarchy of a country (Mexico), or if a primate city dominated the network of metropolitan regions.  To prepare people to understand the rubric, I put together this presentation, based primarily on my time researching in Mexico City (download the PPT file to access my notes for each slide).  The problems with primate cities are hardly unique to Mexico City; this additional BBC article bemoans Britain’s lack of a true second city, arguing that London’s shadow looms too large for sustained national development outside of the primate city. 


Tags: APHG, urbanunit 7 cities, megacities.

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 22, 9:24 AM

The concept of a primate city has both benefits and drawbacks for the country in which it is located. The large population of the primate city draws new technology and foreign investment into the country. Unfortunately, the large population of the primate city also leads to population and brain drain from the surrounding regions which can damage the overall economic and intellectual status of the country. 

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 9:45 AM

Primate Cities are furthered studied using Mexico as an example.

Primate cities affect movement by having a greater pull on migrants.

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Sydney, Melbourne more expensive than New York, says Living Index

Sydney, Melbourne more expensive than New York, says Living Index | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Sydney and Melbourne have cemented their place on a list of the world's most expensive cities in which to live.
dilaycock's insight:

Not exactly news if you live in either of these two cities!

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Sick cities: why urban life is breeding new illness fears

Sick cities: why urban life is breeding new illness fears | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"Human proximity in cities has been rising as a result of increases in world population, and rapid urbanisation – the World Health Organisation has said that, while 4 in 10 people were living in cities in 1970, by 2050 this proportion will be 7 in 10; during that 70-year period, the world population is projected to have grown from 3.7 billion to 9.3 billion.

The human population is also growing older than ever. This is a significant factor in the spread of disease, says Cutler, because, "the older you get, the more susceptible you get. The very young and very old are the two major groups that are prone to infections."

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, March 8, 5:05 PM

Consequences of urbanisation

Tracey M Benson's curator insight, March 18, 1:46 PM

"The proliferation of touch devices has also contributed to the spread of diseases."

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Shanghai's 'airpocalypse': can China fix its deadly pollution?

Shanghai's 'airpocalypse': can China fix its deadly pollution? | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
The current “airpocolypse” emergency in Shanghai - which has seen schoolchildren ordered indoors to protect them from the polluted air, flights grounded and companies ordered to cut production - comes…...
dilaycock's insight:

The downside of China's rapid industrialisation.

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M Y | N e i g h b o u r h o o d

M Y | N e i g h b o u r h o o d | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
dilaycock's insight:

This site hosted by UrbanGrowth NSW (formerly Landcom) provides some great activitiesrelated to the exploration of neighbourhoods (primary level) and town planning (for secondary students). 

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Infographic for China's Urbanisation | NOST China news

Infographic for China's Urbanisation | NOST China news | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
untitled Here is an infographic for China's Urbanisation produced by the EU-funded Dragon-STAR project. China's urbanisation over the past three decades is a massive phenomenon of scale and speed. In the 1980's, there ...
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François Arnal's curator insight, September 25, 2013 11:54 PM

L'urbanisation de la Chine au cours des dernières décennies  est un phénomène massif par son  l'échelle et par sa vitesse. Dans les années 1980, dans une  Chine très "différente", il y avait moins de 200 millions de  personnes classées en population «urbaine» (un cinquième de la population totale). Cependant, d'ici 2011, 700 millions (la moitié de la population totale) vit dans les zones urbaines, tandis que la  population urbaine va continuer à croître dans le futur car on s'attend à 250 millions de travailleurs migrants  se déplaçant vers les villes d'ici 2030.

L'urbanisation, en Chine, est contrôlé par le système du hukou, un système d'enregistrement des ménages introduit en 1958. Le système du hukou lie juridiquement les travailleurs migrants à leur domicile en milieu rural et a été conçu pour garder les résidents ruraux travaillant sur l'exploitation.

La question de l'urbanisation est un élément clé dans les dicussions bilatérales sino-européennes et est également un domaine d'intérêt pour DRAGON-STAR.

Sally Egan's curator insight, October 3, 2013 10:31 PM

Amazing statistics on the urbanisationof China. A fascinating read to supplement work on global population studues.

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Which Coastal Cities Are at Highest Risk of Damaging Floods? New Study Crunches the Numbers

Which Coastal Cities Are at Highest Risk of Damaging Floods? New Study Crunches the Numbers | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Climate change and rapid urbanization are putting coastal cities at increasing risk of dangerous and costly flooding, a new study shows.
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Residents feel the pull of the east as high-rise living makes up ground

Residents feel the pull of the east as high-rise living makes up ground | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
In a modest reserve in the suburb of Ermington, just north of the Parramatta River and not far from Olympic Park, is the point that marks the demographic centre of Sydney.

Via Sally Egan
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Sally Egan's curator insight, June 11, 2013 5:35 PM

Relevant for the case study of Sydney as a large city from teh developed world.

gina lockton's curator insight, June 24, 2013 7:43 PM

A good one to read on Urban Geography - SYDNEY

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China's cities get eco-smart, what can Australia learn?

China's cities get eco-smart, what can Australia learn? | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
China is urbanising faster than any other country in history. It now has 120 cities with over one million people and 36 cities with over two million.
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We have no idea how the other half lives

We have no idea how the other half lives | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
The growing gap between the rich and poor is most visible in big cities, where the two groups lead very different lives.
dilaycock's insight:

"So we don't know how the other half lives because they are in the other half - the half we live far away from and rarely visit or even drive past. Pretty much all our family, friends and workmates are in the same half we're in."

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Urbanisation joins mining and farming as threat to Great Barrier Reef

Urbanisation joins mining and farming as threat to Great Barrier Reef | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
THE battered Great Barrier Reef may yet face its most damaging issue — urban pollution from millions of people.
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Sally Egan's curator insight, August 31, 3:27 PM

Ecosystems at risk- great releveance to case study or GBR as an ecosystem at risk.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 2, 3:36 PM

Option - marine environments and managementmanagement

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World cities, home to most people, to add 2.5 billion more by 2050: U.N.

World cities, home to most people, to add 2.5 billion more by 2050: U.N. | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - More than half of the world's seven billion people live in urban areas, with the top mega cities - with more than 10 million inhabitants - being Tokyo, Delhi, Shanghai, Mexico
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The state of Australia: our environment

The state of Australia: our environment | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

In the lead-up to the budget, the story of crisis has been hammered home, but there’s more to a country than its structural deficit. So how is Australia doing overall?"

dilaycock's insight:

It's not looking good.

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The World's Most Densely Populated Cities

The World's Most Densely Populated Cities | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
The growth of these cities will create a host of environmental and health problems.

 

By 2210, the global population is expected to grow from just more than 7 billion to 11.3 billion — with 87 percent of the population living in urban areas, according to a new working paper by researchers from NYU’s Marron Institute.

Most of these individuals will be in what’s now the developing world — creating a host of environmental and health problems.

If projections are correct, these new urban dwellers will require the world’s existing cities to expand six-fold to accommodate triple the residents, Richard Florida wrote in The Atlantic. Plus, the world will need 500 new “megacities” of 10 million or more, he wrote.


Via Seth Dixon
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Valerie Bauwens's curator insight, March 28, 1:46 AM

Or will there be a natural come back to the country side?

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 2:42 PM

 Cairo, Egypt has a population density of 9,400 residents per square kilometer. THese numbers are crazy think about it compared to MA or RI and our major cities.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 5:03 PM

APHG-U2 & U6

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China's Empty Cities House 64 Million Empty Apartments - YouTube

"Vast new cities are being built across China at a rate of ten a year, but they remain almost completely uninhabited ghost towns. Racing to stay ahead of the world economy, is the superpower about to implode?" 

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China's urban explosion: 'Sim City' on steroids

China's urban explosion: 'Sim City' on steroids | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
More than half of China's population now lives in cities but the push to urbanize has had mixed results.
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The urbanisation of rural China

The urbanisation of rural China | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
The Chinese government plans to move 250 million people from farms to cities over the next 12 to 15 years.
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Tom Tyndall's curator insight, April 18, 11:48 PM

Internal Migration within China is a feature of their growth.

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WATCH: Urbanisation and the evolution of cities across 10000 years.

WATCH: Urbanisation and the evolution of cities across 10000 years. | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
About 10,000 years ago, hunter-gatherers, aided by rudimentary agriculture, moved to semi-permanent villages and never looked back. With further developments came food surpluses, leading to commerce, specialisation ...
dilaycock's insight:

Short, engaging animation explaining the evolution of agriculture and permanent settlements.  Full lesson available on TedEd.

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Sally Egan's curator insight, October 3, 2013 10:33 PM

A great insight into the development and growth of urban places. A good introduction to the topic in the HSC course.

Ann Kingston-Kerr's curator insight, October 20, 2013 7:36 PM

Watch this video.

Geoffroy Delvinquier's curator insight, November 22, 2013 1:42 AM

Document parlant de l'evolution des villes

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Dormitory city: Melbourne’s brittle highrise apartment boom

Dormitory city: Melbourne’s brittle highrise apartment boom | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
The Melbourne apartment surge is just beginning.
dilaycock's insight:

Interesting comparison of housing trends in Melbourne and Sydney.

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China’s Great Uprooting: Moving 250 Million Into Cities

China’s Great Uprooting: Moving 250 Million Into Cities | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
A 12-year plan to move hundreds of millions of rural residents into cities is intended to spur economic growth, but could have unintended consequences, skeptics warn.
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Amanda Donecoff's comment, July 14, 2013 9:39 PM
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Amanda Donecoff's comment, July 14, 2013 10:24 PM
The people of China are on a downward slope, even though they are in a process of so much production. Their government has too much power and the people don't have enough say. The urbanization process in place is just another way to stop the people from speaking out or even inquiring about their own opinion. Moving everyone into cities is not going to help China expand or grow as much as they need to as a people in the long run. When you change someone into something they're clearly not, they can never aspire to their true potential. The country of China wants to prosper, but contradicts itself because the government is trying to take away a part of life that has been known to man for as long as anyone could probably remember, which is country; the rural lands that have always run across the Earth. The control and power that China is trying to acquire is not coming easy enough to them because they are too independent. They need to let places like the U.S. help build them and inspire them. Also, their plan for complete city life is not moving fast enough. People are unemployed and financially hurt. Even in 2025, people will continue to hurt and regret the decisions made. Sometimes the government can seem cold and unfeeling because they don't take all of the factors into consideration that they need to so they can thrive. Eventually, people need to come out and make decisions that are risky and outside the box to change the direction that their country is being led into. If China does not stop trying to control their people, and push them all into the city rather than the farming country, it could potentially become a place where people would rather die than be who they are. A great example of this is Foxconn. Many children have committed suicide because of the pressure put on them. Unfortunately, China chose the wrong solution. They didn't actually fix the core of the problem. Putting nets up around the buildings stopped some of the deaths, but it doesn't stop the workers or children from feeling so worthless that they shouldn't exist. China needs to make changes for their morality and for their future as a country with a lot of promise and potential. China and all of its people just need to use their power and ability for the right reasons, in the right ways.
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Australia's farming future: can our wheat keep feeding the world?

Australia's farming future: can our wheat keep feeding the world? | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"Australia’s status as a major wheat exporter means we have a special role in helping the rest of the world eat.But with a changing climate, and so much of the world’s wheat being used as animal feeds and for ethanol production, that role is going to become more difficult."

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