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Geography in the classroom
Resources to support the NSW secondary Geography curriculum
Curated by dilaycock
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Why everyone should be able to read a map

Why everyone should be able to read a map | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
New research suggests that map reading is a dying skill in the age of the smartphone. Perish the thought, says Rob Cowen

Via Seth Dixon
dilaycock's insight:

As Seth Dixon suggests, forget the gendered nature of this article and there's a good lesson for all.

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CT Blake's curator insight, September 2, 4:21 PM

Especially Connor McCloud.

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 9:17 AM

this can explain why it is important to NOT always rely on technology. It is good to keep your brain active and the spatial awareness that comes with reading a map is invaluable

Dolors Cantacorps's curator insight, September 5, 3:13 PM

Practiquem-ho a classe doncs!

Rescooped by dilaycock from Geography Education
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South African township's solar-powered cafe

South African township's solar-powered cafe | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Entrepreneur converts shipping container into mobile internet shop powered entirely by the sun.

This 2-minute video shows how an enterpreneur is providing access to the township of Alexandria in South Africa. Students are given free access, along with advice on searching the Net. Great stuff!

 

Tags: Africa, technology, development, video.


Via Seth Dixon
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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 5, 2012 2:36 PM
This shop is awesome. Good for him opening this up randomly, from security guard to owning a solar powered cafe. It gives children the opportunity to become more familiar with the internet and how to use it. What a great idea.
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 5:59 PM

In South Africa, a shipping container is transformed into a mobile internet shop reliant on solar power. While the rest of the world is much more advanced in technology, this shows how non-advanced countries are trying to catch up!

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Smartphones as geospatial tools

The disastrous earthquake in Haiti taught humanitarian groups an unexpected lesson: the power of mobile devices to coordinate, inform, and guide relief efforts.

 

Tags: technology, disasters, Haiti, TED.


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 17, 2013 9:02 PM

We are only beginning to see the applications of smart phones to improve peoples lives.  In this TED talk, Paul Conneally explores some of the possibilities (citizen mapping, crowd-sourced disaster recovery, etc.) that is just sitting in the palm of our collective hands. 

Tony Hall's curator insight, February 18, 2013 6:43 AM

This is why ICT is important. No. Vital! Our students need to see things like this so that they understand the positive aspects of technology. They need to see that SMS, Facebook & Twitter are so much more than just a way sharing silly photos of themselves. This technology has the power to affect real, positive change. 

techsavvygirl's curator insight, February 18, 2013 8:21 AM

Augmenting human potential with smartphones

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Africa Takes Off

Africa Takes Off | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

Ask this question: Which region of the world currently is the home to 6 of the 10 fastest growing economies?  Most people (myself included) would be surprised to hear that the region is sub-Saharan Africa.  While Sub-Saharan Africa is still the least economically developed region with some very significant challenges, too often Africa is only taught as a region of problems and negative patterns.  

 

Trade between Africa and the rest of the world has tripled in the last decade.  Since 2005, Africa is officially receiving more private foreign investment than official aid.  With many counties "skipping the landline phase" and going straight to cell phone technologies, the rapid acceleration of technology means that they Africa's economic infrastructure has the potential to increase quickly.      


Via Seth Dixon
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