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Geography in the classroom
Resources to support the NSW secondary Geography curriculum
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Could this mean the end of the line for the plastic water bottle?

Could this mean the end of the line for the plastic water bottle? | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
It's a battle over billions, but both sides agree plastic bottle sales are falling, writes David Sygall.
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Sydney's footprint is growing despite more efficient resource use

Sydney's footprint is growing despite more efficient resource use | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Sydney's footprint is growing despite more efficient resource use, writes Ben Cubby.
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If All of Earth's Water was put into Single Sphere

If All of Earth's Water was put into Single Sphere | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
If All of Earth's Water was put into Single Sphere, from the USGS Water Science School...

 

"This picture shows the size of a sphere that would contain all of Earth's water in comparison to the size of the Earth. The blue sphere sitting on the United States, reaching from about Salt Lake City, Utah to Topeka, Kansas, has a diameter of about 860 miles (about 1,385 kilometers) , with a volume of about 332,500,000 cubic miles (1,386,000,000 cubic kilometers). The sphere includes all the water in the oceans, seas, ice caps, lakes and rivers as well as groundwater, atmospheric water, and even the water in you, your dog, and your tomato plant."

 

The sphere does not include the potential water that some scientists believe may be trapped in the mantle (and thus not accessible on the surface).  For more about water that is not on or near the surface, see: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2002/03/0307_0307_waterworld.html


Via Seth Dixon
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Gary Robertson's comment, May 7, 2012 9:36 PM
Water is also tied up in hydrated minerals in the rocks of the earth's crust. While not "free" it is still significant and is occasionally freed through subduction and volcanic activity. Furthermore, the earth's mantle may contain even more water than the rest combined! So, maybe the Single Sphere should be larger by more than the cube root of 2, or about 1,083 miles in diameter. See mantle water data at http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2002/03/0307_0307_waterworld.html
Seth Dixon's comment, May 7, 2012 11:08 PM
Thanks Green Uncle Mary! I mean Mean Uncle Gary!
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AGL suspends coal seam gas wells application

AGL suspends coal seam gas wells application | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
AGL Energy has put its application to develop 66 coal seam gas wells in western Sydney on hold, after encountering strong community opposition and hostility from the federal Government.
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Power to the people... for the time being at least.

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Balancing population growth and resources

Balancing population growth and resources | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"The attainment of 7 billion world citizens is cause for both optimism and concern."

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MDG drinking water target being met is cause for celebration

MDG drinking water target being met is cause for celebration | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Sanjay Wijesekera: This achievement shows that where there is a will, it is possible to truly transform the lives of hundreds of millions of people for the better.

 

The MDG (Millennial Development Goal) to cut the global population that does not have access to clean drinking water was cut in half, and five years ahead of schedule. The World Health Organization and the United Nations are very pleased with this achievement, but it is a timely reminder of the developmental problems of poverty and access that still exist. For example, 783 million people still do not have access to clean drinking water.  3,000 children die each day from diarrheal diseases (usually from bad drinking water and poor sanitation). Although some success should be celebrated, the world, in the currently constituted social, economic and political framework, still does not provide the most basic of requirements for a sizable portion of humanity.


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