Geography in the classroom
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Geography in the classroom
Resources to support the NSW secondary Geography curriculum
Curated by dilaycock
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China Drops One-Child Cap After Three Decades to Lift Growth

China Drops One-Child Cap After Three Decades to Lift Growth | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
China’s ruling Communist Party will abandon the one-child policy introduced in the late 1970s to defuse a demographic time bomb that threatens to choke growth in the world’s second biggest economy.
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Sally Egan's curator insight, November 3, 2015 5:45 PM

Great account of teh changed of china's population policy.

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Green Square: infrastructure under pressure as projected population swells

Green Square: infrastructure under pressure as projected population swells | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
The suburb that's set to become the most densely populated in the country is going to be bigger than previously thought, fuelling concerns about the congestion issues already plaguing Green Square.
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Sally Egan's curator insight, October 7, 2015 5:36 PM

Urban dynamics of change operating in Sydney as a large city in developed world are evident in this article. This also relates to an urban dynamic operating in a suburb.

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Adventures in Population Growth

Adventures in Population Growth | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"The International Database at the US Census Bureau [provides] population estimates broken down by country, age and year for essentially every country. [With this data we can track] shifts in population makeup over time. I’ve created a few interesting graphs to show the expected shifts over the next 35 years, including the dependency ratio."


Via Seth Dixon
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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, April 5, 2015 8:18 PM

GTAV AC:G Y10 - Geographies of human wellbeing

CD - The reasons for spatial variations between countries in selected indicators of  human wellbeing

Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:30 PM

This is an example on the population growth and development from the recent years of technological innovation.

Deanna Metz's curator insight, March 1, 2016 8:04 PM

This article has some excellent animated graphs and population pyramids to show some of the demographic changes that countries will be experiencing from now until 2050.  These animated GIFs are perfect teaching images.  


Tag: population, demographic transition model, APHG.

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The changing shape of world demographics

Animating the changing shape of the world population pyramid. For more multimedia content from The Economist visit our website: http://econ.st/1xqEZhX.


Via Seth Dixon
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Bex Swaney's curator insight, December 5, 2014 12:27 PM

Growth of the ageing population, population change as a whole

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 10:47 AM

unit 2

Deanna Metz's curator insight, March 1, 2016 8:05 PM

This is an incredibly powerful and remarkably well-done video by the Economist (see related article here) that is reminiscent of a TED-ED lesson on the importance and value of population pyramids.  This video goes nicely with this article from the World Bank entitled "The End of the Population Pyramid" which highlights the demographic changes that will be reshaping global demographics in the next 50-100 years.  


Tag: population, declining population, demographic transition model, video, APHG.

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ABC Splash ­ ConCensus

ABC Splash ­ ConCensus | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

Thanks tpBring Australian statistics to life with ConCensus - a data visualisation game where students can interact with real data from the 2011 ABS Census.

dilaycock's insight:

Thanks to @audrey_nay for this resource.

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Kate Buckland's curator insight, July 26, 2014 10:26 PM

Interesting graphs, especially to compare home town to state or country

Julie Wicks's curator insight, July 31, 2014 12:21 AM

Useful for Year 7 Place and Liveability. Data can be exported into excel for graphing. 

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The incredible shrinking country

The incredible shrinking country | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
THE mantra since Shinzo Abe returned to office in 2012 has been about pulling Japan out of its long deflationary spiral. But that is much easier said than done when...
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Japan's shrinking population is prompting a major re-think of "Japan's social architecture."

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Population pyramids: Powerful predictors of the future

"Population statistics are like crystal balls -- when examined closely, they can help predict a country's future (and give important clues about the past). Kim Preshoff explains how using a visual tool called a population pyramid helps policymakers and social scientists make sense of the statistics, using three different countries' pyramids as examples."


Via Seth Dixon
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, September 26, 2014 4:04 PM

Population unit

Lauren Quincy's curator insight, March 20, 2015 1:51 PM

Unit 2: Population and Migration

 

This video was about how demographers categorize data and analyze it. This video showed a few different population pyramids in order to show differences in population in different countries. It showed China as an example and pointed out the remnants of the one child policy 35 years before and how the number of men were higher due to sex selective abortions. They also talked about how the population pyramids could show what stage in the demographic transition model a country was in and how they use them to predict future patterns and changes. 

 

This relates to unit 2 because it covers topics such as population change, demographic transition models, sex composition, population policies and much more. Population pyramids are very useful due to the visualization of sex, age and number composition in a countries population. They are very important in the use of predicting the future change in population because it can tell what the population has gone through in the past and what to expect in the DTM. 

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 2015 10:43 PM

This video illustrates how population pyramids have the ability to show how populations will rise and fall over time. Pyramids specifically show the population based on a specific age, and illustrates a country's amount of young people in comparison to the elderly. 

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You are where you live: health, wealth and the built environment

You are where you live: health, wealth and the built environment | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Socioeconomic disadvantage and its impact on where we live and work (and how we get between the two), has enormous implications for health and well-being. But the picture is not as clear cut as many people…
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Baby boomers look to apartment living, upping demand

Baby boomers look to apartment living, upping demand | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Baby boomers are increasingly looking at apartment living, with implications for urban planning.
dilaycock's insight:

Implications of an ageing Australian population on housing and population density.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 7, 2014 8:25 PM

Australian Curriculum Geography - enhancing liveability for different age groups through appropriate housing mixes 

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Sydney, Melbourne more expensive than New York, says Living Index

Sydney, Melbourne more expensive than New York, says Living Index | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Sydney and Melbourne have cemented their place on a list of the world's most expensive cities in which to live.
dilaycock's insight:

Not exactly news if you live in either of these two cities!

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Australia's ageing population less inclined to downsize

Australia's ageing population less inclined to downsize | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

Australia’s ageing population is less inclined to move into smaller dwellings, which may prove to be a key barrier to urban planning."

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Population by Latitude and Longitude

Population by Latitude and Longitude | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Radical Cartography, brought to you by Bill Rankin

Via Seth Dixon
dilaycock's insight:

Interesting stimulus for discussion of why do we live where we live.

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Geoff Findley's curator insight, January 9, 2014 9:37 PM

Cool Cartogram...

 

Keisha Lewis's curator insight, January 12, 2014 8:15 AM

Majorly cool! So many discussions about population distribution can come out of this. :)

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 2014 6:53 PM

We can see that the majority of the world's population is clustered in the mid latitudes in particularly Asia. Showing population in terms of latitude shows how people live based on environmental factors while longitude remains the same throughout, thus showing countries/continents and their rates of population simply based off of that country's growth rate or demographic momentum aside from just looking at climatic preference. For instance, Asia is the most populated area and this is evident because of the current growth rates. 

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The costs and benefits of China's one-child policy

The costs and benefits of China's one-child policy | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
The recent announcement that China’s one-child policy will be partially relaxed will be celebrated worldwide by libertarians, human rights activists and, most importantly, Chinese couples who have longed…...
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DON'T PANIC — Hans Rosling showing the facts about population - YouTube

READ MORE: http://goo.gl/PP6lCl 

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Published December 2014.

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Overpopulation, overconsumption – in pictures

Overpopulation, overconsumption – in pictures | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
How do you raise awareness about population explosion? One group thought that the simplest way would be to show people
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Sally Egan's curator insight, November 23, 2015 6:30 PM

Global challenges

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Choose Your Own Statistics

Choose Your Own Statistics | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
This unique interactive learning resource has been designed to enable students from Years 5 to 8 to gain a better understanding of important human rights issues as they explore the latest statistics from respected Australian institutions.

Thought-provoking Infographics encourage students to critically evaluate their beliefs and deepen their understanding of the role that data representation plays in building knowledge and influencing decisions about social issues. Innovative technology enables students to explore the demographics of Australian society on a national and state level and see how the constitution of our country has changed over time.
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Can we feed a world of 12 billion people?

Can we feed a world of 12 billion people? | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
The world's population could hit 12 billion people by 2100, but can we feed them?
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World cities, home to most people, to add 2.5 billion more by 2050: U.N.

World cities, home to most people, to add 2.5 billion more by 2050: U.N. | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - More than half of the world's seven billion people live in urban areas, with the top mega cities - with more than 10 million inhabitants - being Tokyo, Delhi, Shanghai, Mexico
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The state of Australia: our people

The state of Australia: our people | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

Australia is currently the fastest-growing OECD nation. In 2013, Australia’s population grew by 1.8% compared with the OECD average of 0.7%. This is not as high as the 2.2% in 2008, which was the most rapid rate of growth since 1960. However, among Asian countries, only Singapore and Afghanistan have populations that are growing faster....In the lead-up to the budget, the story of crisis has been hammered home, but there’s more to a country than its structural deficit. So how is Australia doing overall?

dilaycock's insight:

Alarming to see that the OECD has declared Australia as one of the world's most obese nations with more than 50% being overweight or obese. The implications for health care, capacity to work are serious.

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McCrindle Research shows what Australia would look like if entire country shrunk to size of one street

McCrindle Research shows what Australia would look like if entire country shrunk to size of one street | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
IF AUSTRALIA was condensed to a single street of 100 households it would have 260 people and 252 fish.
dilaycock's insight:

Love this! The accompanying infographic is great.

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Australia's population set to double by 2075

Australia's population set to double by 2075 | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
ABS predicts population will hit 46 million in 60 years, with the number of people aged over 65 to double
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Australia's fastest growing age group is 65 and over: ABS

Australia's fastest growing age group is 65 and over: ABS | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
People aged 65 and over constitute Australia's fastest growing age group, according to figures released by the ABS.
dilaycock's insight:

Great overview of Australia's population by age distribution in 2013.

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7 Billion: Are You Typical?

Learn more about population: http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/7-billion To coincide with the arrival of the world's 7 billionth person on October 31, 2011, ...
dilaycock's insight:

Whilst this clip from National Geographic is now over 2 year's old, it provides an interesting insight into the world's population. It also highlights that  describing something as "typical" or "average" often masks the reality.

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Sally Egan's curator insight, March 12, 2014 7:50 PM

An interesting insight into the World's population composition. It also highklights some of teh real differences which are oftern hiden amongst the 'average' data on global population.

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China's urban explosion: 'Sim City' on steroids

China's urban explosion: 'Sim City' on steroids | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
More than half of China's population now lives in cities but the push to urbanize has had mixed results.
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Location, Location: Coastal Living

Location, Location: Coastal Living | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Students prepare a news report that highlights problems facing coastal communities and how climate change might affect coastal populations.
dilaycock's insight:

Activity could be used in regard to the study of coasts, population, and climate change.

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Heather Ramsey's curator insight, December 2, 2013 1:02 PM
This lesson is written for Grades 3-5, but could be adapted for middle or high school students as well. If done correctly, it would make a great inquiry lesson.