Geography in the classroom
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Geography in the classroom
Resources to support the NSW secondary Geography curriculum
Curated by dilaycock
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The Ganges River Is Dying Under the Weight of Modern India

The Ganges River Is Dying Under the Weight of Modern India | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
The country’s future depends on keeping the holy river alive.

Via Seth Dixon
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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 7:00 PM

The Ganges River is a place of religion for these people, they see it as a place where they can bathe for the forgiveness of sins and for ancestors alike. The only problem with this really is that it is a very dirty river, sewage and other sorts of waste, germs and disease are running through it. Unfortunately, the people are drinking from this river.  

Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:21 AM

The Ganges River is the most populated region in all of India. The river is sacred and is very holy to the people of India. The river is a religious river in which the people residing in the area use it as a symbolization or purification, life, bathing and drinking. The bigger issue for 'purification' is the fact that the river is very polluted and unsanitary. The pollution not only threatens the people because it could be used for drinking but it also affects the thousands of species, for example fish, that are in the river. The fish could be a source of food for the very overpopulated area but instead the very own people of India are damaging the river. One would think that a river so sacred would be protected and cleaned but it fails to meet these standards. Overall, regardless of the pollution, India still uses it for its religious beliefs and still declare it a holy river. 

Sarah Holloway's curator insight, February 16, 2016 6:26 PM

This article touches on very serious religious and environmental issues connected to the Ganges River.  The Ganges is the sacred river of Hinduism and in part because the river valley is the most heavily populated region of India.  Simultaneously, this holy river is an incredibly polluted river as it's the watershed for a industrial region that struggles with significant sanitation problems; this is a great article on the environmental and cultural issues of development.

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Air Pollution Killed 7 Million in 2012, According to WHO

Air Pollution Killed 7 Million in 2012, According to WHO | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

The Industrial Revolution may seem like a thing of the past to residents of developed countries, but those who live in developing countries are still very much in the thick of it. Air pollution claimed 7 million lives in 2012, according to a report just released by the World Health Organization, with the vast majority of deaths occurring in low- and middle-income countries.

One out of every eight premature deaths in 2012 was attributable to air pollution, the numbers reveal — a rate double that reported in previous years due to more accurate measures of pollution in both outdoor and indoor environments and in a broader range of rural areas.

The numbers also reveal that the link between air pollution and cardiovascular disease and cancer is even stronger than previously believed. A recent analysis of life expectancy in more and less polluted regions of China also suggested that air quality levies a high tax on health than documented in prior studies.

“The risks from air pollution are now far greater than previously thought or understood, particularly for heart disease and strokes. Few risks have a greater impact on global health today than air pollution,” Maria Neira, director of the WHO’s Department of Public Health, Environmental and Social Determinants of Health, said in a news release.


Via Wildcat2030
dilaycock's insight:

Alarming statistics from the World Health Organisation. This is something that can be, and must be, addressed.

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The world has fresh water, but it's full of poison

The world has fresh water, but it's full of poison | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

Images of the typhoon-ravaged Philippines were terribly confronting, vividly conveying what an angry planet can dish up. But amid the destruction and death, an important point was largely missed: the world’s freshwater supplies are being degraded by a seemingly endless sequence of extreme events.

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, January 30, 2014 11:07 PM

What are you going to do to help us with the world's water?

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Australian waters polluted by harmful tiny plastics

Australian waters polluted by harmful tiny plastics | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Each square kilometre of Australian sea surface water is contaminated by around 4,000 pieces of tiny plastics, according to our study published today in journal PLOS ONE and data repository Figshare…
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We tend to think of plastic pollution as being in the form of bottles, plastic bags etc., but this article highlights the dangers of "tiny plastic" pollution.

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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

Via Seth Dixon
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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:20 AM

I can't image or even relate to the experience of living in a place like this. With rivers polluted right outside your house. And those rivers are what people bathe in and wash their clothes. I can't imagine not being able to access clean drinking water or lacking food. The people in Dhaka endure so much their whole lives, a good percentage of them will always live in poverty.

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The end of nature?

The end of nature? | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
It isn’t the first time I’ve been to Usinsk in the very north of Russia, so I shouldn’t be surprised — but once again, I’m shocked.

 

An interesting look at some environmental issues in the far north of Russia (and when Russians think that it's far north, it's REALLY far north).


Via Seth Dixon
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Denise Pacheco's curator insight, September 24, 2013 11:13 AM

It's horrifying to see such a large space go to such waste thanks to toxic oil spills. Business / people have no respect for nature. This space could have been used to build homes, start a new business , or even for agricultural purpose. The government should step in and clean this up because this land can help boost their economy as well if they put it to good use. It's mind over matter! They need to get to work on this ASAP!

Cam E's curator insight, February 18, 2014 11:35 AM

I never thought of the impact of on-land oil spills, usually it's only something I'd think occurred in the oceans, but I understand now that oil spreading throughout the soil and forests can have an effect just as disastrous.

James Hobson's curator insight, October 20, 2014 9:42 PM

(Russia topic 5 [independent topic 1])

Russia's blind eye to environmental regulation hasn't stopped at Lake Baikal. Sadly the Siberian landscape is being destroyed at an unimaginable scale by careless oil operations. Companies well known even here in the U.S. like Lukoil and Shell are running operations that aren't just harming the environment... they're eradicating it. Even disregarding all of the political tensions, it is shameful to note how one's morality, one's instinct's, one's sense of heart, one's common sense haven't kicked in by now. It's one thing for a nation to exploit itself, but when universal things (such as the environment) which are inarguably are ruined, there lies an even more severe sense of immorality and beyond-monetary "debt" owed to the rest of the world.

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Asia Society Has Opened Window on China's Environment

Asia Society Has Opened Window on China's Environment | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

Since 2007, the China Green project at the Asia Society, based in New York City but with a sizable presence in Hong Kong, has been tracking the mainland's worsening environmental plight." 

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Big polluters: one massive container ship equals 50 million cars

Big polluters: one massive container ship equals 50 million cars | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"In international waters ship emissions remains one of the least regulated parts of our global transportation system. The fuel used in ships is waste oil, basically what is left over after the crude oil refining process. It is the same as asphalt and is so thick that when cold it can be walked upon . It's the cheapest and most polluting fuel available and the world's 90,000 ships chew through an astonishing 7.29 million barrels of it each day, or more than 84% of all exported oil production from Saudi Arabia, the worlds largest oil exporter."

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Shanghai's 'airpocalypse': can China fix its deadly pollution?

Shanghai's 'airpocalypse': can China fix its deadly pollution? | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
The current “airpocolypse” emergency in Shanghai - which has seen schoolchildren ordered indoors to protect them from the polluted air, flights grounded and companies ordered to cut production - comes…...
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The downside of China's rapid industrialisation.

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Plastic and politics: how bureaucracy is failing our forgotten wildlife

Plastic and politics: how bureaucracy is failing our forgotten wildlife | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Seabirds: the poster children for ocean health. Fishers use them to identify fishing hot spots.
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China Vehicle Population Hits 240 Million as Smog Engulfs Cities

China Vehicle Population Hits 240 Million as Smog Engulfs Cities | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
China added more cars last year than the total number plying its roads in 1999, illustrating the challenges the government faces in controlling vehicular emissions and traffic congestion in its cities.
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Popping the pipe: how sewage gets out into the environment

Popping the pipe: how sewage gets out into the environment | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Australia’s urban waterways are often polluted and sick. They suffer from a condition called the “urban stream syndrome”.
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