Geography in the classroom
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Geography in the classroom
Resources to support the NSW secondary Geography curriculum
Curated by dilaycock
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How A 'Small But Mighty' Team Of Googlers Is Using Maps To Save People And The Planet

How A 'Small But Mighty' Team Of Googlers Is Using Maps To Save People And The Planet | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
It’s 2008 and five Google employees are in the Brazilian rainforest.
dilaycock's insight:

Great example of organisations working with indigenous peoples.

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Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World

Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

Elizabeth Borneman explores how cartography and cartographic projections help and hinder our perception of the world.

"How do you think the world (starting with our perceptions) could change if the map looked differently? What if Australia was on top and the hemispheres switched? By changing how we look at a map we truly can begin to explore and change our assumptions about the world we live in."

 

Geography doesn’t just teach us about the Earth; it provides ways for thinking about the Earth that shapes how we see the world.  Maps do the same; they represent a version of reality and that influences how we think about places. 

 

Tags: mapping, perspective.


Via Seth Dixon
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Mrs. B's curator insight, September 22, 2014 7:02 AM

Unit 1 !!!!

 

samantha benitez's curator insight, November 22, 2014 2:53 PM

helps show the different perspectives of our world and how it has changed. also shows many different forms of mapping our world throughout time.

Emily Coats's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:34 AM

UNIT 1 

This article discusses map projections and how they shape our perception of the world. Maps influence how we see the world, and could change the way we see it as well. These projections show us many different views of the Earth, which is very influential to our perspectives. This applies to unit 1 and its major concepts and underlying geographical perspective such as analyzing maps. 

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NatGeo Mapmaker Interactive

NatGeo Mapmaker Interactive | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
dilaycock's insight:

This is a great resource. Allows teachers and students to build maps using a wide range of layers. Maps can be saved, shared or printed.

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Tracey M Benson's curator insight, April 27, 2014 5:21 PM

What an amazing resource - I could lose hours creating maps with this tool.

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This Funny World Map Shows What Every Country Leads The World In - Eye Opening Info

This Funny World Map Shows What Every Country Leads The World In - Eye Opening Info | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
A wonderful map created by William Samari, Ray Yamartino, and Rafaan Anvari of DogHouseDiares illustrates what every country does better than every other country. They collected the information from various sources and sprinkled in some quirkier rankings since many countries led the world in multiple things.
dilaycock's insight:

Just for fun (although some of the info is serious). 

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Tracey M Benson's curator insight, March 18, 2014 4:42 PM

Australia: deadly animals and melanoma = great!

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Free Technology for Teachers: 10 Online Activities and Resources for Geography Awareness Week

Free Technology for Teachers: 10 Online Activities and Resources for Geography Awareness Week | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"Next week is Geography Awareness Week. National Geographic Education has highlighted some of their activities for the week. I've put together a collection of other online activities to use during Geography Awareness Week."

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'Street View Adventures' Converts Google Maps Street View to Gameplay

'Street View Adventures' Converts Google Maps Street View to Gameplay | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

'Street View Adventures' Converts Google Maps Street View to Gameplay. Instead of randomly Street View-ing, you're dropped in various cities around the world and have to make it to a point on the map as quickly as you can, and your movement is entirely based in the world of Street View. Of course you can hit a button to refer to the overhead map of the area, but throwing down good times depends relies on good map memory.

dilaycock's insight:

Could be a fun way to have students improve their navigation skills. App costs $0.99.

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Europe In The Eyes Of An Artist

Europe In The Eyes Of An Artist | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Click for your daily dose...

Via Seth Dixon
dilaycock's insight:

Apart from  aesthetic value, these artistic "maps" might help students recall the names of European countries

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Michael Amberg's curator insight, March 23, 2015 11:00 PM

its interesting to see these countries from a different perspective.

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Ordnance Survey maps the UK in Minecraft | Information Age

Ordnance Survey maps the UK in Minecraft | Information Age | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Ordnance Survey has built a scale model of Britain in building game Minecraft to demonstrate the uses for its free open mapping data
dilaycock's insight:

Use as a prompt to have students think about the types of data that could be mapped in Minecraft... then have them do it!

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Developed vs developing maps

Developed vs developing maps | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Geography can be difficult to teach - sometimes it can seem like it's mostly just facts and places. Regions. Types of mining in different places. Weather patterns. Vegetation. Lots of, well . . . b...
dilaycock's insight:

Interesting ways to stimulate discussion of Developed and Developing Worlds.


via @Stephen_H

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Gabe Tucker's comment, September 10, 2013 8:33 PM
It is quite obvious to see which countries are developed and which countries are still developing. The obvious developed areas are the USA, Western Europe, and a majority of India and China. The developing areas are South America, Eastern Europe/Asia, and Australia. Africa is mostly undeveloped. These trends are due to technology and finances. The countries with the most technology are more developed, and the countries with the least technology are still developing or are not developed at all.
Justin McFarland's comment, September 12, 2013 9:32 PM
It's interesting to see what countries have developed and what countries are still finding there way in this world; whether its with technology, government policy, but in this case ... its maps.
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Free Technology for Teachers: Mission Map Quest - Create Your Own Geography Games

Free Technology for Teachers: Mission Map Quest - Create Your Own Geography Games | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"The concept is simple, you create a series of clues that your students need to follow to identify places around the world. You can add as few or as many clues to your Map Quest as you like. When you're ready to have students try your Quest just give them the web address of the challenge or have them scan the QR code assigned to your Quest."

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Mary Coates's comment, August 12, 2013 5:55 PM
I think games in the classroom would be beneficial to teachers and students. It gives the teachers a break from lecturing and the students a break from listening the lectures. It really depends on how people learn and how they absorb the information, but for me I tend to remeber information when it is played on a game, or used in any interactive experience. I think teachers should at least try a few games in their cirriculum and see how the class responds to the way the information is given.
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Illustrators and Visual Storytellers Map the World

Illustrators and Visual Storytellers Map the World | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"More than 500 maps by artists, illustrators, and designers representing the creative zeitgeist of modern cartography around the world, ranging from the astoundingly accurate and detailed to the marvelously abstract and utopian."

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OverlapMaps - Instantly compare any two places on Earth!

OverlapMaps - Instantly compare any two places on Earth! | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
An OverlapMap is a map of one part of the world that overlaps a different part of the world. OverlapMaps show relative size.

 

This is an very simple way to demonstrate the true size of places, and 'bring the discussion home.'  This site is as simple and intuitive as it is powerful and easily applicable.  This is a keeper.  


Via Seth Dixon, Jarett Schiebel
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Michael Grant's comment, September 12, 2012 4:07 PM
This toll will and can provide a reliable mapping source to geographers everywhere. It is useful and fun. A neat way to learn cartography
Josiah Melchor's comment, September 12, 2012 11:31 PM
The OverlapMap is a very useful tool that will allow a user to compare different places and parts of the world. Having a more accurate size of a place is critical when comparing 2 or more places. I think that many users besides me will find this very convenient when other resources are not available.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 21, 2014 11:48 PM

The above overlap map is the United Kingdom compared to the state of Pennsylvania.  This is a very simple way to demonstrate the true size of remote places, and 'bring the discussion home.'  This site is as simple and intuitive as it is powerful and easily applicable.  This is a keeper. 

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Blaise Aguera y Arcas demos augmented-reality maps

At TED2010, Blaise Aguera y Arcas demos new augmented-reality mapping technology in Bing Maps from Microsoft.

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Why everyone should be able to read a map

Why everyone should be able to read a map | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
New research suggests that map reading is a dying skill in the age of the smartphone. Perish the thought, says Rob Cowen

Via Seth Dixon
dilaycock's insight:

As Seth Dixon suggests, forget the gendered nature of this article and there's a good lesson for all.

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Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 2014 9:17 AM

this can explain why it is important to NOT always rely on technology. It is good to keep your brain active and the spatial awareness that comes with reading a map is invaluable

Dolors Cantacorps's curator insight, September 5, 2014 3:13 PM

Practiquem-ho a classe doncs!

Richard Thomas's curator insight, July 30, 2015 10:52 PM

Despite the gendered overtones of the article (that it's important for men to learn to read a map), this is some good advice, regardless of gender.  The vocabulary and concepts of maps can strengthen spatial cognition and geography awareness.  While GPS technology can help us in a pinch, relying primarily on a system that does not engage our navigation skills will weaken our ability to perform these functions.  While it intuitively makes sense, that the 'mental muscles' would atrophy when not used, it is a reminder that an overuse of geospatial technologies can be intellectually counterproductive.  So break out a trusty ol' map, but more importantly, be a part of the spatial decision-making process. 


Tags: mapping, spatial, technology, education.

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40 Maps That Explain The Middle East

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
These maps are crucial for understanding the region's history, its present, and some of the most important stories there today.

Via Seth Dixon
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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, March 15, 2015 8:47 PM

It is interesting to see the same trends over and over again.  These maps are a great tool to show the history of the area, as well as the history of religion and political views.  I appreciate the information provided since the Middle East has undergone the most transitions (going all the way back to Mesopotamia) and its history can be confusing. 

Alex Vielman's curator insight, November 23, 2015 3:17 PM

Maps like the ones posted in this article, really helps people to understand and break down deeply of understanding the entire region as a whole. Visualization is very important in geography when trying to understand the region people are talking about. this region as goes down to the Mesopotamia Era. It is important to know, how the culture was in this area to how it differentiated during the Ottoman Empire. During the first couple of maps, we can begin to see the division of the entire region. As you go on, we begin to notice the divisions between people, religion, language between states and in-states. There is so much information to know about the Middle East region and it may be even harder to understand due to the tons of changes and separations, but it is important to understand these divisions like the Sunni's and the Shi'ites in order to fully explain the development and the current situations that are occurring in this region as we speak. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 7, 2015 5:18 PM

These 40 maps are a very interesting way of showing how people have traveled around and moved about the Earth from the time of the fertile crescent era to the people of today. It shows us the paths that people have taken to move to a new location. How they used the Meditteranean Sea to move from one side to the other. It also shows how the Tigris and Euphrates came together to form a smaller area of the Persian gulf. This led to smalled economic growth because now there is less land for imports and exports.

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The 10 Poorest Countries in the World - Top Ten

The 10 Poorest Countries in the World - Top Ten | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
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Useful maps on a good range of geographical factors. Can be printed (with watermark). Via @kconnors (Twitter)

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How to Read a (Good) Map

How to Read a (Good) Map | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"Just as you shouldn’t trust everything you read or see on television, you should never blindly trust information just because it is on a map. All maps posit arguments. Maps present information about how something is. All maps posit arguments. Maps present information about how something is. Just as there are no unbiased arguments, there are no unbiased maps."


Via Seth Dixon
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John Slifko's curator insight, November 23, 2013 5:09 PM

Map skills are vital in the study of democratic place and space. 

YEC Geo's curator insight, November 24, 2013 4:44 PM

Good advice.

Ignacio Garrido's curator insight, November 26, 2013 1:09 AM

Exercise 14 :

 

Read the news and answer the questions:

 

a.What is the news talking about ?

b. There are two maps.Maps that is down has these questions ( Answer them ) :

Who made the map?What is the purpose of the map? That is, what is the map attempting to communicate?Who is the intended audience? (It is important to remember that the map may not have been designed for you, but a more specialized audience.)Does the map effectively achieve its communication goals? Does it present an interesting story or argument?

c.Sum up the news ( five sentences in english )

d.Choose another map ( of Internert  if you want ) and answer the questions 1,2,3 i 4. Add the map.

 

Send by moodle.Good luck¡

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The dresses emblazoned with satellite maps of cities around the world

The dresses emblazoned with satellite maps of cities around the world | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Cityzen by Azin was the brainchild of New York-based architect, Azin Valy and the collection is made up of dresses, purses and scarves.
dilaycock's insight:

Not sure I would want lost travellers staring closely at my "map" :)

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How to Plan a Trip Itinerary Using Custom Google Maps

How to Plan a Trip Itinerary Using Custom Google Maps | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"Creating your own custom Google Map—probably one of the most super under-utilized tools ever in travel planning—is almost perfect for visualizing routes between multiple destinations. Maybe because the option to create your own map is usually located under “My places,” it never actually occurred to me that it would be useful on my trips. The best part about it is that you can get as detailed or as general as you want, depending on how you scale your map."

dilaycock's insight:

Whilst the author highlights some shortcomings of this activity, it could be an interesting classroom activity.

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Ordnance Survey maps Britain in Minecraft - Eurogamer.net

Ordnance Survey maps Britain in Minecraft - Eurogamer.net | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Ordnance Survey maps Britain in Minecraft
Eurogamer.net
The map is 86,000 sq miles across, BBC News reported, and contains more than 22 billion blocks.
dilaycock's insight:

More on the UK mapping initiative using Minecraft. Take a tour in Minecraft of the survey maps.

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Uncharted Territory: The Power of Amateur Cartographers - Wired Science

Uncharted Territory: The Power of Amateur Cartographers - Wired Science | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"The question as to who should be responsible for making sure the world is accurately and comprehensively mapped is as tricky to answer as the question of data ownership. Google has pledged to improve its maps and fill in the gaps to make it “perfect’, but even its critics agree that the duty does not lie with the company to do so."

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Why do Map Projections Matter?

This is a clip from the TV show West Wing (Season 2-Episode 16) where cartography plays a key role in the plot.  In this episode the fictitious (but still on Facebook) group named "the Organization of Cartographers for Social Justice" is campaigning to have the President officially endorse the Gall-Peters Projection in schools and denounce the Mercator projection.  The argument being that children will grow up thinking some places are not as important because they are minimized by the map projection. 

 

As Salvatore Natoli (a leader in geography education) was quoted in the video clip: "In our society we unconsciously equate size with importance and even power." This is one reason why many people have underestimated the true size of Africa relative to places that they view as more important or more powerful.


Questions to Ponder:  Why do map projections matter?  Is one global map projection inherently better than the rest? 

 


Via Seth Dixon
dilaycock's insight:

Great illustration of the way in which maps can represented data differently, and the impact of doing so.

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Mr Steven Newman's curator insight, April 14, 2013 3:44 AM

An excellent extension exercise. 

Evan Margiotta's curator insight, September 24, 2014 11:01 PM

This clip from West Wing (Season 2 - Episode 16), describes the disadvantages of the Mercator Projection, and demonstrates a small part of American map illiteracy. The clip shows the Mercator Projection put up against the Gall-Peters Projection. Both these maps show an latitude and longitude connecting at right angles, which makes these maps easy to read and draw up from memory when picturing a map. For these reasons the Mercator Projection is the map used in schools across the U.S. and most of the world. The distortion of the regions closer to the pole inflates the size of the western superpowers, as well as Russia (which was the U.S.S.R. when these maps were first implemented in schools), while in comparison downsizing the developing countries of Sub-Saharan Africa. As the video shows, many westerners do not actually know of the distortion, leading to an overblown sense of size and importance. In comparison westerners often downgrade the importance and size of developing countries in Africa, not realizing their size, which is actually accurate on the Mercator Projection (because it is on/near the equator), is much larger in comparison with the western countries.

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36 Maps That Explain The Entire World

36 Maps That Explain The Entire World | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"There may be no better way of explaining the world than through maps.Whether they depict oil flows, internet cables, or migration patterns, a good map can explain a concept in a way that no other visualisation can.

They may be even better than charts. We’ve compiled 36 cartographic visualizations that depict the state of the world in 2013, and how we got there."

(Business Insider Australia)

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How We Use Maps and Globes: An Illustrated Guide from 1968

How We Use Maps and Globes: An Illustrated Guide from 1968 | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"A charming reminder of how far we've come -- and what we've given up along the way. Originally published in 1968 as part of the same Social Studies Program series that gave us How People Live in the Suburbs, the slim 48-page book explores the basics of distance, scale, direction, and orientation through vibrant illustrations, black-and-white photographs, and simple words." Maria Popova

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dilaycock's comment, January 8, 2013 1:37 AM
Ah yes... fond memories :)
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PLACE: Population, Landscape, and Climate Estimates

PLACE: Population, Landscape, and Climate Estimates | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Version two of the Population, Landscape, and Climate Estimates data set, PLACE II, has been released as part of SEDAC’s National Aggregates of Geospatial Data Collection. The aim is to provide country-level measures of spatial characteristics of 228 nations to researchers for whom national aggregates are more useful than GIS data.
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