Geography in the classroom
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Geography in the classroom
Resources to support the NSW secondary Geography curriculum
Curated by dilaycock
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How Cities Use Design to Drive Homeless People Away

How Cities Use Design to Drive Homeless People Away | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"Saying 'you're not welcome here'—with spikes."


Via Seth Dixon
dilaycock's insight:

I'd never really taken notice, or heard of some,  of the architectural deterrents mentioned here. I can't believe that we, as a society, go to such lengths to make life even more difficult for those already struggling. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 23, 2014 11:01 AM

Geography explores more than just what countries control a certain territory and what landforms are there.  Geography explores the spatial manifestations of power and how place is crafted to fit a particular vision.  Homeless people are essentially always 'out of place.'  This article from the Atlantic and this one from the Guardian share similar things: that urban planners actively design places that will discourage loitering which is undesirable to local businesses.  This gallery shows various defensive architectural tactics to make certain people feel 'out of place.'  Just to show that not all urban designs are anti-homeless, this bench is one that is designed to help the homeless.     


Tags: urbanplanning, architecture, landscape, place.

Michael MacNeil's curator insight, August 2, 2014 8:38 AM

Lack of understanding of mental disability can lead to heartlessness. There is so much that needs to be done.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:52 PM

APHG-U7

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Meandering Stream

Meandering Stream | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"I'm used to rivers that know what they're doing."


Via Seth Dixon
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Hoffman's comment, September 14, 2013 1:32 PM
hmm, looks like some river had a little to much
Peter Phillips's comment, October 5, 2013 7:31 PM
All rivers move. Those that have a wide, flat basin meander most. Those meanders can be even more dramatic than in this image, snaking 10's of kilometres sideways over time. Combine this action with geological upheaval and it gets even more interesting. Check out images of the Murray River in Australia from space.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, December 6, 2013 11:34 AM

Lol... the first words that went through my head were h--- (heck) yeah.  David Bowie... sung by an astronaut... okay, back to Geography. I thought that the rivers reminded me of something I thought of during the talk in class about lava rock being changed into other kinds of rocks over time, and cycling around.  I thought on a larger scale, about this universe, and I have read before that people are studying different areas of space-time fabrics, trying to find origins of the Universe, and answers to other existential questions.  I suppose that if one could trace patterns of rivers, and if one could trace patterns of rocks, to find where they came from, and why/how they came where they came, then by examining the (assumedly tattered and marked) fabrics of space and time, people would be able to determine origins of everything from the beginning of what existed before all universes, and also the origins of life forms.  I enjoyed the movie Prometheus, which was directed by Sir Ridley Scott, and I had to say that I thought that the messages found on rocks in caves, as a catalyst that lead the cast to go visit an alien world that had something to do with human origins, could be very literally taken.  If there are clues in rocks, why wouldn't there be other clues, possibly in celluar components of life forms, or space and time?  Applying the idea of studying rocks and rivers and other physical geographical pursuits to the idea of applying it on a gigantic scale greatly appeals to me.  I believe that humans will find some answers that way, but I hadn't directly realized just that until we mentioned some stuff about physical geography, and glacial forces carrying and spreading out rocks, and deposits and erosion.  After all, the Milky Way has origins, so why believe that we came from the Milky Way, rather than beyond?

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Seeing Landmarks From Far Away Might Shatter Your Perception Of Them

Seeing Landmarks From Far Away Might Shatter Your Perception Of Them | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Wow. I guess it's true when they say not everything is as it appears...

Via Seth Dixon
dilaycock's insight:

These are great photos. Highlights the difference we often have between our anticipation of travel and its reality. When I was at Stonehenge in 2012, a new information centre/ car park was being built about 1km away in an attempt to reduce human impact on the site.

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, March 21, 2014 11:34 AM

I think it's awesome to see the past mixed with the present, and realizing how our imagination adds to the "mystery" of places.  However, seeing things in context truly changes perception - how could this be brought to your students?  Fascinating.  

Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, March 28, 2014 11:43 AM

LA PERCEPCIÓN A TRAVÉS DE LA DISTANCIA

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 2014 5:33 PM

By looking at these images it is apparent that heir is a clear distincition between how one may view the monument from upclose andd then when you take asep back you can really appreciate it by seeing others appreciate it as well. As an observer you can also identify the different persepectives by looking at it in a different light by either taking a step back or viewing it from a different vanage point. Knowing the history of the monument also helps with a background story in order for better appreciation of the monument and the History that goes along with it.