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Geography in the classroom
Resources to support the NSW secondary Geography curriculum
Curated by dilaycock
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Enabling Globalization: The Container

Enabling Globalization: The Container | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"The ships, railroads, and trucks that transport containers worldwide form the backbone of the global economy. The pace of globalization over the last sixty years has accelerated due to containers; just like canals and railroads defined earlier phases in the development of a global economy. While distance used to be the largest obstacle to regional integration, these successive waves of transportation improvements have functionally made the world a smaller place. Geographers refer to this as the Space-Time Convergence."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 14, 5:32 PM

I've posted here several resources about the global economy and the crucial role that containers play in enabling globalization.  In this article for National Geographic Education, I draw on many of these to to put it all in one nice container.  


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World

Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Investigate for yourself the mechanisms of global trade

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HG Académie de Rennes's curator insight, April 17, 2014 4:00 PM

Ressource numérique interactive mêlant planisphère, routes maritimes, graphiques de l'activité portuaire et vues aériennes des plus grands ports du monde et de leur aménagement notamment pour la conteneurisation du commerce maritime. Une ressource tout à fait exploitable en 4e bien qu'étant en anglais (très peu de texte). On pensera aussi à la classe de terminale et aux DNL anglais.

Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, April 28, 2014 1:57 PM

Un excellent site très utile lorsque l'on traite de la mondialisation


Pour aller plus loin

    - Site de l'Isemar (une mine)

    - Des statistiques très utiles

    - Les grands ports d'Asie orientale (conférence d'Yves Boquet, FIG, 2009) 

    - Conférence de Jacques Charlier : compte-rendu (conférence FIG 2013)

    - Le conteneur, une histoire de la mondialisation


FIG : Festival International de Géographie de Saint-Dié-des-Vosges


Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:05 PM

While this might simply seem like a group of ports the more important message conveyed is that in fact that the majority of them are located in East Asia. Gone are the days of the industrial centers of the earth being located in Europe and the Americas. Paired with cheap labor and ease of global transportation many of these East Asian countries are quickly over coming many of the earths previous economic giants. 

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Welcome to the Anthropocene

A 3-minute journey through the last 250 years of our history, from the start of the Industrial Revolution to the Rio+20 Summit. This video is a great primer for discussing human and environmental interactions as related to industrialization, globalization and climate change.
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Energy Needs

Energy Needs | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"Welcome to Energy Realities, a visual guide to global energy needs, which shows how technology and intelligence are ensuring humanity continues to progress. The site combines maps, multimedia, and writing from three premier publishers and tells the story of energy use, production, sustainability on our planet. We invite you to explore and share this content to help increase understanding and dialogue about our world's energy needs."

 

 


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Ship-Shipping Ships

Ship-Shipping Ships | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"This is a ship-shipping ship, shipping shipping ships."  http://geographyeducation.org/2013/10/14/ship-shipping-ships/

 


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Pretty amazing!

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jim dzialo's curator insight, October 16, 2013 2:54 PM

Pretty sure that doesn't fit in the panama canal

 

L.Long's curator insight, February 16, 2014 4:28 AM

The two industries that are the real backbone of globalization are transportation and communication.  What has accelerated the pace of global interconnectedness is the scale of these devices and their ubiquity in facilitating massive global commerce.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:33 PM

#shippingships

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'I was 14 when I was sold'

'I was 14 when I was sold' | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Laxmi's story of being kidnapped and trafficked in Nepal is not an isolated case but, as this graphical account shows, things are not always what they seem.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 23, 2013 4:38 PM

Teaching about human trafficking and child slavery can be very disconcerting and uncomfortable.  How much of the details regarding these horrific situations is age-appropriate and suitable for the classroom?  The BBC is reporting on events with sensitive stories to both give a human face to the story, while protecting the identity of under-aged victims (to read about the production of this comic, read Drawing the News.)  I encourage you to use your own discretion, but I find this comicbook format an accessible, informative and tasteful way to teach about human trafficking in South Asia to minors.  It is a powerful way to teach about some hard (but important) aspects of globalization and economics. 


As geographer Shaunna Barnhart says concerning this comic, "It moves from trafficking to child labor to pressures for migration for wage labor and the resulting injustices that occur. There's differential access to education, gender inequality, land, jobs, and monetary resources that leads to inter- and intra-country trafficking of the vulnerable. In the search for improved quality of life, individuals become part of a global flow of indentured servitude which serves to exploit their vulnerabilities and exacerbate inequalities and injustice. Nepali children 'paid' in food and cell phones that play Hindi music in 'exchange' for work in textile factories - cell phones that are themselves a nexus of global resource chains and textiles which in turn enter a global market - colliding at the site of child labor which remains largely hidden and ignored by those in the Global North who may benefit from such labor."


Tags: Nepal, labor, industry, economic, poverty, globalization, India.


Ssekyewa Charles's curator insight, April 24, 2013 9:03 AM

Where is Human Rights Watch? Human trafficing is a crime to humanity!!

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:14 PM

It is sad to see the many different ways the poverty stricken and uneducated regions of the world are exploited, especially the children. Nepal is so poor that most of the recruiters for the predatory foreign networks are often locals who either take their relatives or abductees sent back to find a replacement. The animation helps add clarity and approachability to a bleak and difficult topic.

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The world map of chocolate (made out of chocolate)

The world map of chocolate (made out of chocolate) | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
You may be focussing on chocolate over the weekend - but where does it come from? A global trade analysed. In chocolate (this is what maps are made for!

 

What is the geography of chocolate like?  There is a dark side (no pun intended) to the production of cocoa in many places such as West Africa. 


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ethne staniland's curator insight, May 16, 2013 11:33 AM

Interesting for our KS1 chocolate topic.

Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 10, 2013 5:43 PM

We all love chocolate.  We all love diamonds and jewels.  In western worlds, these items are easily come by in grocery stores and elsewhere, but what got them there was a challenge.  People in poorer tropical regions around the world worked to get the raw goods of these delicate items we all enjoy.  The payout difference is immense from cocoa to chocolate.  It is sometimes a very crooked market where if it wasn't for the hard working people who get the raw ingredients, chocolate as we know it wouldn't be the same.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 11:06 AM

I hope the production keep growing up. We need more chocolate and specially in Africa.