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Geography in the classroom
Resources to support the NSW secondary Geography curriculum
Curated by dilaycock
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Stunning Photos Of Earth From Above Will Change Your Outlook Of The Planet

Stunning Photos Of Earth From Above Will Change Your Outlook Of The Planet | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
This daily dose of satellite photos helps you appreciate the beauty and intricacy of the things humans have constructed--as well as the devastating...

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Diane Johnson's curator insight, June 15, 2014 11:19 AM

Great images for giving students a global perspective.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 17, 2014 9:33 AM

unit 1

Sally Spoon's curator insight, Today, 4:01 PM

Really cool to look at. Interesting to use as writing starters.

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Flag Food

Flag Food | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
dilaycock's insight:

Now here's an interesting activity for students!

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Trisha Klancar's curator insight, February 4, 2013 10:09 AM

I love it... I am seeing an extra credit project with this... feed the teacher and make it educational too!

Mark Slusher's curator insight, February 9, 2013 8:46 AM

Now THIS is geographical food for thought! Talk about conquering a nation!

Emily Larsson's comment, September 10, 2013 8:15 PM
I love that! It's so creative. Whoever came up with the idea to do this as an advertisement for the international food festival did a great job. They all look so delicious. Food festivals are a great way to experience other cultures.
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"The Most Amazing High Definition Image of Earth Ever," Says NASA

"The Most Amazing High Definition Image of Earth Ever," Says NASA | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
NASA has released a new Blue Marble image, showing the United States of America. According to them, it's the "most amazing, highest resolution image of Earth ever." Blue Marble 2012 bests the 2010 edition and the original one.

 

Beautiful image...follow the link for a video of the image at a variety of scales as well as the specs and production that went into it.   There is an 8000 x 8000 pixel version as well as many lower resolution versions. 

 


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Meandering Stream

Meandering Stream | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"I'm used to rivers that know what they're doing."


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Hoffman's comment, September 14, 2013 1:32 PM
hmm, looks like some river had a little to much
Peter Phillips's comment, October 5, 2013 7:31 PM
All rivers move. Those that have a wide, flat basin meander most. Those meanders can be even more dramatic than in this image, snaking 10's of kilometres sideways over time. Combine this action with geological upheaval and it gets even more interesting. Check out images of the Murray River in Australia from space.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, December 6, 2013 11:34 AM

Lol... the first words that went through my head were h--- (heck) yeah.  David Bowie... sung by an astronaut... okay, back to Geography. I thought that the rivers reminded me of something I thought of during the talk in class about lava rock being changed into other kinds of rocks over time, and cycling around.  I thought on a larger scale, about this universe, and I have read before that people are studying different areas of space-time fabrics, trying to find origins of the Universe, and answers to other existential questions.  I suppose that if one could trace patterns of rivers, and if one could trace patterns of rocks, to find where they came from, and why/how they came where they came, then by examining the (assumedly tattered and marked) fabrics of space and time, people would be able to determine origins of everything from the beginning of what existed before all universes, and also the origins of life forms.  I enjoyed the movie Prometheus, which was directed by Sir Ridley Scott, and I had to say that I thought that the messages found on rocks in caves, as a catalyst that lead the cast to go visit an alien world that had something to do with human origins, could be very literally taken.  If there are clues in rocks, why wouldn't there be other clues, possibly in celluar components of life forms, or space and time?  Applying the idea of studying rocks and rivers and other physical geographical pursuits to the idea of applying it on a gigantic scale greatly appeals to me.  I believe that humans will find some answers that way, but I hadn't directly realized just that until we mentioned some stuff about physical geography, and glacial forces carrying and spreading out rocks, and deposits and erosion.  After all, the Milky Way has origins, so why believe that we came from the Milky Way, rather than beyond?

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NASA - Image of the Day

NASA - Image of the Day | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
NASA.gov brings you images, videos and interactive features from the unique perspective of America’s space agency.

 

NASA has stunning galleries of images including this link to their daily image.  The big news today about the NASA images is that they have recently made the 172-page e-book Earth as Art a free download (PDF). 

 

A great discussion starter for the lesson.

 


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