Geography in the classroom
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Geography in the classroom
Resources to support the NSW secondary Geography curriculum
Curated by dilaycock
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Providing the toilets people want will help Clean India's campaign

Providing the toilets people want will help Clean India's campaign | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Indian prime minister Narendra Modi has wowed audiences in Australia during his recent visit and used the occasion to remind people of his plan to provide a toilet at home for all Indians by 2019. The…
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Urbanisation Up Close - Speaking of Medicine

Urbanisation Up Close - Speaking of Medicine | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Jocalyn Clark @jocalynclark discusses the urbanisation of the world’s population and its impact on global health. Image credit: joiseyshowaa, Flickr Undeni
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TeachUNICEF

TeachUNICEF | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
TeachUNICEF is a portfolio of free global education resources. Resources cover grades PK-12, are interdisciplinary (social studies, science, math, English/language arts, foreign/world languages), and align with standards.
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"TeachUNICEF is a portfolio of global education teacher resources designed and collected by the U.S. Fund for UNICEF’s Education Department for teachers, afterschool instructors, and parents. The units, lesson plans, stories, videos and multimedia cover topics ranging from the Millennium Development Goals to poverty and water and sanitation."

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World Health Day - Take a Trip to Ghana and Catalyse Change

World Health Day - Take a Trip to Ghana and Catalyse Change | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

Today is World Health Day - an event in the annual calender to remind us all of the importance, and inequalities, in health as well as healthcare access around the world. 

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Infant and child mortality | Global development | The Guardian

Infant and child mortality | Global development | The Guardian | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Latest news and comment on Child mortality from the Guardian
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A collection of articles highlighting issues in infant and child mortality, particularly in developing countries.

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Aids deaths soar among young due to inadequate health services

Aids deaths soar among young due to inadequate health services | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Deaths among 10- to 19-year-olds increase by 50%, with women up to three times more likely to get infected, says WHO
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Despite the global trend of a reduction in aids-related deaths in the genral population, the figures for women and young people indicate there is still much to be done.

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Imagine life without a proper toilet: that's the reality for 1 in 3 people

Imagine life without a proper toilet: that's the reality for 1 in 3 people | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
It’s 2014. So why do we still need World Toilet Day? Because 2.5 billion people still need one. World Toilet Day remains a critical means to raise awareness globally about one of the many important things…
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Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 24, 2015 1:10 AM

This article made me appreciate the fact that I have a toilet. Although I know that many people in world do not have toilets, I did not know the extent of the problems caused by the lack of toilets. It's sad to know that so many children are dying everyday from preventable illnesses that people in developed countries hardly know anyone can die from. I think a lot of the problems of lack of sanitation is caused by corrupt governments and inefficient international action. Although these supranational organizations give money to these poor countries to aid them in creating better sanitation systems, the corrupt governments in these countries use the money not on their own people, leaving the people to suffer more. What makes the problem worse is the fact that many of these countries without sanitation systems face the largest population booms, which worsens the issue of sanitation even more. 

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16 Children & Their Bedrooms From Around the World…

16 Children & Their Bedrooms From Around the World… | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
What did your childhood bedroom look like? Chances are if you grew up in a westernized world, it had a solid bed, scattered toys, and wall decorations that creatively expressed the type of child you were, and hinted at the person you were to become. What you may have taken for granted, however, a large percent of others will never experience. There’s no right or wrong pertaining to living situations, but many unique lessons to be gained from acknowledging that the type of childhood one is given has an impressionable effect on their future.
dilaycock's insight:

What a great way to connect with students and discuss issues such as lifestyle, living standards, health etc.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 18, 2014 5:34 AM

Personal geographies - perspectives and worldviews

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Air Pollution Killed 7 Million in 2012, According to WHO

Air Pollution Killed 7 Million in 2012, According to WHO | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

The Industrial Revolution may seem like a thing of the past to residents of developed countries, but those who live in developing countries are still very much in the thick of it. Air pollution claimed 7 million lives in 2012, according to a report just released by the World Health Organization, with the vast majority of deaths occurring in low- and middle-income countries.

One out of every eight premature deaths in 2012 was attributable to air pollution, the numbers reveal — a rate double that reported in previous years due to more accurate measures of pollution in both outdoor and indoor environments and in a broader range of rural areas.

The numbers also reveal that the link between air pollution and cardiovascular disease and cancer is even stronger than previously believed. A recent analysis of life expectancy in more and less polluted regions of China also suggested that air quality levies a high tax on health than documented in prior studies.

“The risks from air pollution are now far greater than previously thought or understood, particularly for heart disease and strokes. Few risks have a greater impact on global health today than air pollution,” Maria Neira, director of the WHO’s Department of Public Health, Environmental and Social Determinants of Health, said in a news release.


Via Wildcat2030
dilaycock's insight:

Alarming statistics from the World Health Organisation. This is something that can be, and must be, addressed.

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Sick cities: why urban life is breeding new illness fears

Sick cities: why urban life is breeding new illness fears | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"Human proximity in cities has been rising as a result of increases in world population, and rapid urbanisation – the World Health Organisation has said that, while 4 in 10 people were living in cities in 1970, by 2050 this proportion will be 7 in 10; during that 70-year period, the world population is projected to have grown from 3.7 billion to 9.3 billion.

The human population is also growing older than ever. This is a significant factor in the spread of disease, says Cutler, because, "the older you get, the more susceptible you get. The very young and very old are the two major groups that are prone to infections."

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, March 8, 2014 8:05 PM

Consequences of urbanisation

Tracey M Benson's curator insight, March 18, 2014 4:46 PM

"The proliferation of touch devices has also contributed to the spread of diseases."

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HIV and Aids: record numbers in poorer countries receive treatment

HIV and Aids: record numbers in poorer countries receive treatment | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
HIV infection rates tumble by 33% in a decade, while number of Aids-related deaths falls from 2.3m in 2005 to 1.6m last year
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Global Maps - Children's Chances

Global Maps - Children's Chances | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
This section provides a global picture of where countries stand on laws and policies that governments can implement to make a difference in children’s life chances.
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via @GeoBlogs

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