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Geography in the classroom
Resources to support the NSW secondary Geography curriculum
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Enabling Globalization: The Container

Enabling Globalization: The Container | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"The ships, railroads, and trucks that transport containers worldwide form the backbone of the global economy. The pace of globalization over the last sixty years has accelerated due to containers; just like canals and railroads defined earlier phases in the development of a global economy. While distance used to be the largest obstacle to regional integration, these successive waves of transportation improvements have functionally made the world a smaller place. Geographers refer to this as the Space-Time Convergence."


Via Seth Dixon
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Brian Wilk's curator insight, January 31, 2015 9:31 PM

By standardizing the containers, world wide exports and imports can flow much more freely and with less interruption. The same type of crane that loads a container full of vodka in Russia can unload that container in Abu Dhabi. Shared information about what works best and what need improving can be shared down the supply chain to make vast improvements across the network creating efficiencies as they go. The same technicians, the same mechanics and the same crane operators become interchangeable parts in this global system. What initially sounds like something Einstein would say, the Space-Time Convergence, is just a large Lego set with all of the parts ready made and fitted for universal use. Sometimes simpler is better...

 

Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 2, 2015 5:19 PM

Containers are part of globalization. It saves time and allows for extra space to store more products. Also, it is easier to handle using ships, railroad, and trucks while also facilitating more quality in terms of safety. However, on the other hand, with the creation of these containers employ mainly the use of technology which, unfortunately, downsizes the workforce. This, as a result, increases the unemployment rate for citizens. Although, when it comes to recycling, the idea of making houses with these containers helps families in diverse ways such as decreased costs, energy efficiency, and very short construction time. Containers have shaped the concept of shipping and living for many years, impacting regions with more business and expansion trades around the world.

Cody Price's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:57 PM

This article describes the basics of globalization and what technology really allowed globalization to spread, the shipping the container. It allowed thing to be shipped organized and more efficiently. These containers fit together perfectly. It helps ideas and products transport all over the world and spread pop culture. 

 

This relates to the idea in unit 3 of globalization. These shipping container allow ideas and products to be shipped all over the world. The shipping container was the key to better connecting the world. 

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UNESCO | Teaching and Learning for a Sustainable Future: Globalisation

UNESCO | Teaching and Learning for a Sustainable Future: Globalisation | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"Globalisation is the ongoing process that is linking people, neighbourhoods, cities, regions and countries much more closely together than they have ever been before. This has resulted in our lives being intertwined with people in all parts of the world via the food we eat, the clothing we wear, the music we listen to, the information we get and the ideas we hold."

dilaycock's insight:

Part of a suite of great resources  from UNESCO on teaching and learning for a sustainable future.

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Geemik's curator insight, June 6, 2014 3:37 AM

Teaching and Learning for a Sustainable Future, is a training programm of UNESCO. It will enable teachers to plan learning experiences that empower their students to develop and evaluate alternative visions of a sustainable future and to work creatively with others to help bring their visions of a better world into effect. It will also enhance the computer literacy of teachers and build their skills in using multimedia-based resources and strategies in their teaching.

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Toyota to cease manufacturing in 2017

Toyota to cease manufacturing in 2017 | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Toyota to follow Holden and Ford and end its local production.
dilaycock's insight:

Useful one minute video summary of the Toyota situation.

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Secondary - Geography - ABC Splash

Secondary - Geography - ABC Splash | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"Splash now has an entire section devoted to the new Geography curriculum including video, animation and audio resources.

We have resources on bushfires and coral reefs right through to global population pressures and tourism." 

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How Vietnam became a coffee giant

How Vietnam became a coffee giant | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"Think of coffee and you will probably think of Brazil, Colombia, or maybe Ethiopia. But the world's second largest exporter today is Vietnam. How did its market share jump from 0.1% to 20% in just 30 years, and how has this rapid change affected the country?"

 


Via Seth Dixon
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Chris Costa's curator insight, November 9, 2015 2:20 PM

Globalization is a polarizing topic, and that is embodied very well in this article concerning the economic ascendancy of the Vietnamese economy. Globalization is responsible for the colonization of the nation, and the subsequent century of bloodshed between opposing nationalist and international forces. Global trade, however, and the introduction of coffee in Vietnam by the French, is responsible for Vietnam's current economic boost. 30 years ago, 60% of Vietnamese lived below the national poverty line; today, that number has fallen to below 10%, an extraordinary achievement. How? Vietnam has emerged as a major player in the global coffee trade, its market share rising from 0.1% to 20% in the same time period, ensuring mass employment for the first time since colonization. Is the system perfect? No- we have learned that diversified economies are integral to development, and nations too dependent on a single sector of the economy can face ruin when confronted with fluctuating market prices, supply, and global demand. There could be improvements to the existing trade, and the government could be doing even more for those who fall below the poverty line- the average Vietnamese worker still only makes a paltry $1300 annual salary- but this is a major step in the right direction. Hopefully this trend can continue, and Vietnam can continue its rise and become a fully developed nation, much like its predecessors in Asia, South Korea, China, and Japan.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 8:59 PM

Well for one thing this gives a chance for growth at the expense of others. I noticed though that the numbers stated that since the end of the war in 1975 the poverty level has decreased from 60% to 10%. But what about the possibility of corruption? environmentally there appears to be  deforestation, lots of water usage therefore future water shortage.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:29 PM
Typically I would always associate coffee and coffee beans coming from Spanish speaking countries and I would associate Asian countries with drinking tea. This threw me for a little twist, The Vietnamese do drink coffee though. Coffee was introduced to Vietnam in the 19th century by the French. A majority of their coffee beans are exported since the country needs money. After the Vietnam war had ended, their communist ally, The Soviet Union did nothing to help the crippled country. Agriculture was a disaster, bu the government decided to take a risk in the 80s with growing coffee. It was a success and kept increasing 20%-30% every year in the 90s. Now it employs over two million people. Even major brands like Nestle has coffee bean growing rights there.
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The Debate Over Globalization

The Debate Over Globalization | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Students research, analyze, and debate the pros and cons of globalization.
dilaycock's insight:

Useful lesson on the pros and cons of globalisation for Years 6-12. 

Via Nicole Bailey at Barker College.

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Ship-Shipping Ships

Ship-Shipping Ships | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"This is a ship-shipping ship, shipping shipping ships."  http://geographyeducation.org/2013/10/14/ship-shipping-ships/

 


Via Seth Dixon
dilaycock's insight:

Pretty amazing!

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Jamie Strickland's curator insight, October 15, 2013 1:35 PM

First, this is a fantastic photo...a freighter shipping other freighters.  As my colleague Seth Dixon points out, this is a fantastic image of one of the important drivers of the acceleration of globalization in recent history.  

jim dzialo's curator insight, October 16, 2013 2:54 PM

Pretty sure that doesn't fit in the panama canal

 

L.Long's curator insight, February 16, 2014 4:28 AM

The two industries that are the real backbone of globalization are transportation and communication.  What has accelerated the pace of global interconnectedness is the scale of these devices and their ubiquity in facilitating massive global commerce.

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Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World

Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Investigate for yourself the mechanisms of global trade

Via Seth Dixon
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Anneliese Sjogren's curator insight, December 10, 2015 11:01 PM

It's interesting to see how these ports have gotten so big. So many are in China, and that is probably because there are so many products made there that are shipped to other places around the world.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 4:00 PM

The interesting concept to these places is that most of them are all located on the East coast of the asian continent. This is a prime example of how global trade has shifted to the Pacific giving rise to these import/export global markets allowing their economy to shift and grow at a rapid pace.  These areas of global transportation has created the "4 Tigers" as they are all within the top 10 global transportation ports.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 7:57 PM
This is a pretty informative interactive map of the largest ports in the world. Very well put together to help some understandings of trade. Most of the ports are on the East coast of China which is the Pacific Sea. The reason there are probably so many here in China is because they make a large amount of product that needs to be shipped worldwide. They are like the leading country in imports and exports to other global or major global markets.
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Global supply chains link us all to shame of child and forced labour

Global supply chains link us all to shame of child and forced labour | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
The fragmentation of global production has dramatically increased the length and complexity of supply chains. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) estimates that more than…
dilaycock's insight:

A good reminder that globalisation can distance us from the human issues of production.

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China Has Accomplished Something In Global Trade Not Seen Since Colonial Britain

China Has Accomplished Something In Global Trade Not Seen Since Colonial Britain | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"China is a true mega-trader — a position last held by colonial Britain, with trade significant not only as a share of world trade (11.5%) but also of its own GDP (47%).  The U.S. is China's top export destination. China's trade with Latin America has risen more than 200 times since 1990 and is the fastest-growing corridor. China's trade is beginning to slow, however. Exports accounted for about 25% of GDP in 2012, down from 35% in 2007." 


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Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:51 PM

China's exportation has grown so high and has reached a multitude of nations, not unlike British Imperialism. Though China has reached a lot of nation and has grown economically, it has also slowed down.

The movement of goods is greatly portrayed in economic sectors through trade patterns.

 

Sean Goins's curator insight, November 13, 2014 1:31 PM

in the global market, china has become the rising power in the exporting market with latin america which has risen more than 200 times since 1990 and is the fastest, but has also slowed down in more recent times but is still one of the largest exporters in the world

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 10:38 PM

A new Standard Chartered report by Madhur Jha and other Standard Chartered economists, titled "Global Trade Unbundled," highlights just how much of a trading giant China has become. "China is a true mega trader-- a position last held by colonial Britain, with trade significant not only as a share of world trade but also of its own GDP", according to Jha. "China will likely become a champion of free trade." In 2013, China topped the United States for the first time. China's imports and exports of goods amounted to $4.16 trillion dollars. The United States is China's top destination for exports. This is obvious because if we look on half the items we use daily, they probably say "Made in China". China's exports with Latin America and Africa are still continuing to grow rapidly. Jha and others believe that China will remain the top trader mostly because the economic recovery is a positive for China. Also because a lot of attention is paid towards exports from China rather than imports. China's trade rates are likely to keep growing at a steady pace.

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Toyota's $500m handout a dead end

Toyota's $500m handout a dead end | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Toyota's decision to shut down local manufacturing, which is expected to cost thousands of jobs and billions in investment, comes despite the Japanese car maker receiving government grants of up to $492 million over the past four years.
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Free Technology for Teachers: A Cartoon Explanation and Game About International Trade

Free Technology for Teachers: A Cartoon Explanation and Game About International Trade | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"After watching the video on international trade have your students put their new knowledge to use in Trading Around the World from the International Monetary Fund."

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The Container that Moves the Global Economy

The Container that Moves the Global Economy | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
The unsung hero of the global economy: the shipping container.

Via Seth Dixon
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megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:16 AM
Containers have become such an essential part of our economy and shipping all together. SHipping in containers and on ships is not only cost effective but they can use machines to load them onto the decks of the ships. You can fit an obscene amount of product in the containers as well. The containers are also completely private you cannot see into the container so people are less likely to steal if they are unable to know what is inside.
Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 5, 2014 11:50 PM

We discussed how the container has transformed the global economy. These videos show how a simple tee shirt is made from cotton in the US, labor in Columbia, Indonesia, and Bangladesh. In the 1950s Malcolm McLean developed the first shipping container industry and transformed the global economy. Due to the fact that these containers can hold some many items, shipping goods from place to place makes manufacturing a global process. Economic geographies were completely revamped by the innovation of McLean, now a making a tee shirt connects the economies of many nations. A piece of clothing being sold in the United States now is connected to labor across the globe. 

Vicki Bedingfield's curator insight, November 5, 2015 4:54 PM

Tracking the commodity of the T-shirt from cotton to retail.

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Are Multinationals Becoming Less Global?

Are Multinationals Becoming Less Global? | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
New evidence that we are not as globalized as we think.
dilaycock's insight:

Interesting article that draws on extensive research to indicate the reduction of cross-border activity by the Fortune 500 multinationals. The research shows these companies continue to "locate the bulk of their activities at home and mainatian a pronounced regional focus in their operations."

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The geography of my stuff

The geography of my stuff | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

This unit of work focuses upon the interconnections and inter-relationships that link teenage consumers living in the UK with societies and environments overseas (where the goods they purchase are made). As well as explaining how these connections work - and why they have come into being - the unit introduces students for the first time to some of the moral, ethical and environmental issues that are associated with the global trade in consumer goods (including child labour and food miles).


Via Maree Whiteley
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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, May 15, 2013 1:45 PM

Plenty of hands-on examples and case studies are provided that will help teachers deliver these themes in an accessible and interactive way. Students will gain a first impression of some key ideas relating to retail land use from convenience stores to retail parks.

Sally Egan's curator insight, May 28, 2013 7:25 PM

Looks terrific for the new National Curriculum 'Geographies of Interconnections' for Yr 9.

Janelle Lundy's curator insight, August 17, 2013 5:49 AM
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