Geography in the classroom
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Geography in the classroom
Resources to support the NSW secondary Geography curriculum
Curated by dilaycock
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Women & Agriculture

"In this Feed the Future video, narrator Matt Damon discusses the importance of increasing food production around the world and notes the importance of equipping women with the right tools, training, and  technology to see as much as a 30 percent increase in food production. To feed our growing population we need to increase food production by 70 percent before 2050. Women make up the majority of the agricultural workforce in many areas of the world."


Via Seth Dixon
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AckerbauHalle's curator insight, December 23, 2014 12:37 AM

Für die zukünftige Ernährung der Welt gibt es einen oft übersehenen Faktor: Gleichberechtigung von Frauen. Frauen sind in vielen Ländern für die Arbeit auf den Feldern verantwortlich. Gleichzeitig haben sie keine Rechte am Land und sind schlecht ausgebildet und - wenn überhaupt - schlecht bezahlt. 

Lauren Quincy's curator insight, March 19, 2015 4:50 PM

Unit 5: Agriculture, Food Production and Rural Land Use 

 

This video is about how women make up the majority of the agricultural workforce and that giving them access to land, water, markets, and technology could increase food production by 30%. This in return would help boost the economy. Places such as Kenya have given women the same resources as men and have seen a 22% increase in crop production. In Brazil, programs targeting women in agriculture have helped cut the population in extreme poverty by half and malnutrition by 73%. This video encourages people around the world to help give women the resources they need in order to increase the food production and economy. 

 

This relates to unit 5 because it deals with agriculture and particularly women's roles in agriculture. This video explains how increased resources can help end world hunger. Women are not given as much opportunity as men and this video expresses need to invest in women's rights. 

mary jane james's curator insight, January 12, 8:11 PM

This article relates to my topics development and agriculture by showing how important it is that how equipping women with the right tool can make so much more food and how other countries should accept women and give them rights. Just like the video states women make up a majority of the world and countries need to take that advantage. Just like the video states women make up a majority of the world and countries need to take that advantage. Sooner or later the population will take over how much food we make, even with new technology we still might not make it fast enough or enough to support life on earth. The video states that we need to increase food production to 70% by 2050

 

 In my opinion, this video really does touch base with how women are treated today in modern society and how they can become a really big impact on our food production if only they had the access to the same resources as men do. Then maybe we might have a chance to reach the goal what we need to in 2050.

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Ethiopia's Dam Problems

Ethiopia's Dam Problems | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"Ethiopia is three years from completing a dam to control its headwaters, and while Egypt points to colonial-era treaties to claim the water and to stop the project, the question remains as to who own the Blue Nile."


Via Seth Dixon
dilaycock's insight:

Useful example to illustrate the interactions and tensions between natural resources and political systems.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, July 16, 2014 10:44 AM

units 4 and 6

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 20, 2014 8:00 PM

Option: Inland water 

Kate Buckland's curator insight, July 26, 2014 10:38 PM

At least the Murray-Darling Basin is within one country - even if it covers 4 states!

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Improving Mortality Rates In Ethiopia

Improving Mortality Rates In Ethiopia | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"A baby born today in Ethiopia is three times more likely to survive to age 5 than one born in 1990.  This progress isn't a result of expensive international aid or the recruitment of foreign doctors into Ethiopia. Instead, the country has invested in simple, bare-bone clinics scattered around the country, which are run by minimally-educated community health workers."


Via Seth Dixon
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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 2014 2:42 PM

Education makes a huge difference in the health of poor nations. All they needed was to educate a few citizens on the basics of diseases endemic to the region and they have seen significant improvement in the health of the citizens.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 3, 2014 1:35 PM

This is amazing!  Although Ethiopia still has a long way to go in the medical field they have made major improvements in the last few years.  The building being used as an office is not anything spectacular by any means but it is helping save lives.  Common ailments that used to be the cause of death of young children are now treatable and children are able to live past their fifth birthday.  This is a big deal for the people in Ethiopia.  This is not any expensive program brought in by the United States, but a government run program created in Ethiopia.  Common remedies are given to children as well as vaccines that are carefully documented for who needs what and when by the people that run the facilities.  Although the program is still improving and it may take a long time for it to become top notch, the improvement that has been because of this is stellar for the circumstances.

Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 8, 2015 12:58 PM

Mortality rates have become overwhelmingly high in many countries. Ethiopia has now found simple health remedies to improve these rates. Many of these poor countries do not have numerous resources or even medication to help them when they are sick. Ethiopia used to have one of the highest child mortality rate in the world. one of the statistics given was very alarming and it stated ""If you were a kid born in 1990 [in Ethiopia], you had a 1 in 5 chance of not surviving to your fifth birthday." This is horrific for children who cannot predict where they are born and raised. Since 1990, Ethiopia has improved that rate by 60%. They havented invested a lot of money but have opened basic clinics with community individuals who are minimumally educated on these matters. Many of these workers have gone through a one-year training but nothing fancy. Many of these clinics have even two rooms and no electricity. Many of these children are finally being treated properly for some basic things that shouldn't be taking their lives. There is a long way to go for improvemnet but as long as their is a will to help these children, this country will vastly improve.

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AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa

AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Despite the gains, more Africans still die from Malaria even as the spotlight remains firmly fixed on HIV/AIDS.

Via Seth Dixon
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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 2014 10:41 AM

This infographic shows how pervasive disease is in Africa. Though HIV gets a lot of attention, malaria and tuberculosis are just as prevalent as HIV/AIDS. The attention given to HIV/AIDS is reflected in the amount of aid sent to Africa, with a significant amount more being spent to halt the spread of HIV. These efforts are not entirely in vain as there have been decreases for all three diseases, but the funding necessary to make serious progress not on its way.

 

Though there is an even greater need to fight malaria, more international aid for HIV/AIDS is likely because most of the countries sending aid are not as familiar with malaria and HIV/AIDS has become sensationalized.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:52 PM

Disease is a global problem. Not having enough resources to keep diseases such as malaria out of Africa is unfortunate. People are dying every day and in efforts to save these people, it still can't be done. In the past, AIDS was the main disease that killed people in Africa. More recently, malaria is working its way through humans and killing them more than AIDS.

TavistockCollegeGeog's curator insight, July 4, 2014 7:41 AM

Fantastic infographic on health risks in Africa. Particular focus on infectious diseases.

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Urbanization and Megacities: Jakarta

"This case study examines the challenges of human well-being and urbanization, especially in the megacity of Jakarta."


Via Seth Dixon
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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 2014 2:25 PM

It is nice to see an organization that is not just blindly giving resources to people in need but actually empowering them and training them to be able to get the things they need through work. The women in this story describe how they have learned to make and sell things in order to take care of their families and they describe how empowering that feels.

L.Long's curator insight, August 28, 2015 6:11 AM

mega cities Jakarta

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 28, 2015 6:53 AM

Megacities are beginning to populate the entire globe. In the developing world, more and more megacities are beginning to form. Jakarta Indonesia is an example of a rising megacity. This rapid urbanization has placed a special burden on the resources and local economies of many developing nations. This areas are not prepared to deal with the rapid population growth associated with the development of a megacity. This strain placed on the local areas, will often lead to terrible living conditions for the lower classes of society. Sanitation will often become a major issue in many of these megacities. Large portions of the population will often lack a proper sanitation system. The lack of proper sanitation will lead to the onset of deadly diseases. The effects of rapid urbanization can be deadly, for those living in the pooper regions of society.

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What the world eats -- a week's worth of groceries

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Jen-ai's curator insight, May 1, 2013 10:03 AM

!  This is so informative.  

Laurie Diamond's curator insight, May 3, 2013 9:03 AM

An interesting look and different cultures

Samuel Yeats's curator insight, May 8, 2013 12:40 AM

Q1) How does this slideshow depict the differing socioeconomic situations of countries around the world? (Use the example of at least 2 countries)

Q2) Do you think that the image of an Australian weekly diet is accurate to your own family and why?

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Human Development Index

"This video shows the basic concept of HDI (Human Development Index), by using four different examples (Japan, Mexico, India and Angola)."


Via Seth Dixon
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Maggie Naude's curator insight, March 1, 2013 4:32 PM

some emerging markets, Japan

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, March 6, 2013 2:38 PM

Des cartes pour comprendre le monde

Tracey Sarvis's curator insight, November 9, 2014 8:24 AM

HDI

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South African township's solar-powered cafe

South African township's solar-powered cafe | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Entrepreneur converts shipping container into mobile internet shop powered entirely by the sun.

This 2-minute video shows how an enterpreneur is providing access to the township of Alexandria in South Africa. Students are given free access, along with advice on searching the Net. Great stuff!

 

Tags: Africa, technology, development, video.


Via Seth Dixon
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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 5, 2012 2:36 PM
This shop is awesome. Good for him opening this up randomly, from security guard to owning a solar powered cafe. It gives children the opportunity to become more familiar with the internet and how to use it. What a great idea.
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 2014 5:59 PM

In South Africa, a shipping container is transformed into a mobile internet shop reliant on solar power. While the rest of the world is much more advanced in technology, this shows how non-advanced countries are trying to catch up!

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AfriGadget: Recycling

A Cameroonian boy shows the recycled parts used to construct a toy RC car.

 

I originally found this video on one of the coolest websites ever: http://www.afrigadget.com/ ; The website seeks to show people "solving everyday problems with African ingenuity." While the developed world lives in a commercial, disposable society, Africans often need to maximize the useablity of all objects. The solutions they come up with can show students that it is not all doom and gloom in Africa, an represent a triumph of the human spirit.


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Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 4:00 PM

Africa has an advantage as being one of the youngest continent in the world. With child innovative projects such as this, in the near future, these kids will be able to compete with the rest of the world on a global spectrum. They are not bound by their circumstances but are finding new ways to create a better future for themselves

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, November 4, 2015 7:42 PM

Rescooped from Professor Dixon. Human's really are incredible. This is a pretty cool excerpt on a homemade tool in Africa. It also points out the extreme poverty they live their day to day lives with.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:54 PM

see this is how the world should be, making the best out of a situation and not just complaining about how you dont have toys, make a toy and enjoy it. also, i probably would not have been able to make that.

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Welcome to the Anthropocene

A 3-minute journey through the last 250 years of our history, from the start of the Industrial Revolution to the Rio+20 Summit. This video is a great primer for discussing human and environmental interactions as related to industrialization, globalization and climate change.
Via Seth Dixon
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South Asia doing worst on UN development goals

South Asia doing worst on UN development goals | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
South Asian nations are making the least progress in the Asia-Pacific region on meeting MDGs, an Asian Development Bank official says...

 

The UN's developmental goals are include reducing child and maternal mortality, halving poverty and hunger, providing universal primary education, gender equality and halting the spread of HIV/AIDS. In the Asia/Pacific region there are 17 countries that are not meeting the goals and all South Asian countries (except Sri Lanka) are labeled as 'off track.'


Via Seth Dixon
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Justin Ng Jie Ern's curator insight, January 20, 2014 10:22 AM

There are about 17 countries who are off-track the Millennium Development Goals. Out of the 17, all South Asian countries are included with the exception of Sri Lanka.

These countries are experiencing poverty and the lack of proper education.

I am worry for these 17 countries, as most of them are undevelop countries. I am afraid that as the world continues to move forward for the better,  these undeveloped countries would get left behind in the process.

I am dissapointed by the fact that some countries' government are not taking the initiative to help the country to stop poverty, and end the misery of these countries.

But i am enlighted and encouraged by the fact that, some of the governments are taking up the initiative to stop poverty. I am also enlighted that these governements are trying their best to improve their education system for young minds too.

In my opinion, all government should take the initiative to clear this obsacle called 'poverty' and help improve their education system, to help educate this country's children.

BrandonTeoZX's curator insight, January 21, 2014 7:41 AM

Reading this article, i feel a bit spoilt. Why? Here i sit, in a comfortable armchair and with a roof over my head, food on the table, clothes to wear, i feel like a king compared to them. People in southeast asia are not doing very well, children having no basic education, people contracting HIV or AIDS easily, some do not even have clean water to drink from. Singapore is a country in Southeast asia, and yet we are one of the world's richest nations, in stark contrast to the other parts of Asia. What can people do about this? What can we do to help? 

jerriel wai's curator insight, January 26, 2014 8:55 AM

connect: The UN has been helping countries facing poverty issues for quite some time now. They are a great corparation that helps

 

extend: I thought they only helped the countries not solve the countries problems. This should be done by the government.  I believe that this can be done by making the government corruption free.

'

challenge: Lets try to stop poverty in south asia, shall we?

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Agriculture and Rural Development Day UN Climate Talks

Agriculture and Rural Development Day UN Climate Talks | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Farmers are at the forefront of dealing with climate change around the world. How are they coping, and what opportunities do the shifts present?

 

An excellent set resources discussing the plight of farmers various regional and ecological situations.  From the famers in Mozambique impacted by unreliable rainfall to Guyana farmers at risk from rising sea fells, climate change is impacting the most vulnerable (and the least responsible) the hardest.  


Via Seth Dixon
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Imagine life without a proper toilet: that's the reality for 1 in 3 people

Imagine life without a proper toilet: that's the reality for 1 in 3 people | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
It’s 2014. So why do we still need World Toilet Day? Because 2.5 billion people still need one. World Toilet Day remains a critical means to raise awareness globally about one of the many important things…
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Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 24, 2015 1:10 AM

This article made me appreciate the fact that I have a toilet. Although I know that many people in world do not have toilets, I did not know the extent of the problems caused by the lack of toilets. It's sad to know that so many children are dying everyday from preventable illnesses that people in developed countries hardly know anyone can die from. I think a lot of the problems of lack of sanitation is caused by corrupt governments and inefficient international action. Although these supranational organizations give money to these poor countries to aid them in creating better sanitation systems, the corrupt governments in these countries use the money not on their own people, leaving the people to suffer more. What makes the problem worse is the fact that many of these countries without sanitation systems face the largest population booms, which worsens the issue of sanitation even more. 

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Where the extremely poor live

Where the extremely poor live | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
dilaycock's insight:

This information is taken from the World Bank's 2014 report "Prosperity for All." The report looks at "progress to date in reducing global poverty and discusses some of the challenges of reaching the interim target of reducing global poverty to 9 percent by 2020.... . It also reports on the goal of promoting shared prosperity, with a particular focus on describing various characteristics of the bottom 40 percent."

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Gorete Queiroga de Figueiredo's curator insight, May 4, 2014 7:34 PM

Os extremamente pobres não vivem [existem] existem mais aqui.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:48 PM

This graphic reveals the poorest populations and where they live and even though India and China are economic competitors on the global stage they still have the poorest communities. 

IN poor communities, the human place is changed by using less structurally sound architecture and disregarding cultural presence for functionality though holding true to cultural presence in individual lives.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 11:49 AM

I agree with this article from the Guardian that development should be measured in human rights gains more than economic advancements.  While globalization is taking place and allowing countries to trade and maximize profits, a large percent of people in the world are deprived basic human rights and are entirely forgotten about and not valued.

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High Above Earth, Satellites Help Direct Ground-Breaking Development Work

High Above Earth, Satellites Help Direct Ground-Breaking Development Work | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
A space-based partnership between the World Bank and the European Space Agency is opening up new frontiers in international development.
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Developed vs developing maps

Developed vs developing maps | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Geography can be difficult to teach - sometimes it can seem like it's mostly just facts and places. Regions. Types of mining in different places. Weather patterns. Vegetation. Lots of, well . . . b...
dilaycock's insight:

Interesting ways to stimulate discussion of Developed and Developing Worlds.


via @Stephen_H

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Gabe Tucker's comment, September 10, 2013 8:33 PM
It is quite obvious to see which countries are developed and which countries are still developing. The obvious developed areas are the USA, Western Europe, and a majority of India and China. The developing areas are South America, Eastern Europe/Asia, and Australia. Africa is mostly undeveloped. These trends are due to technology and finances. The countries with the most technology are more developed, and the countries with the least technology are still developing or are not developed at all.
Justin McFarland's comment, September 12, 2013 9:32 PM
It's interesting to see what countries have developed and what countries are still finding there way in this world; whether its with technology, government policy, but in this case ... its maps.
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The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism

The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Researchers are heading to Dharavi, Mumbai, to study the impact of slum tours on the residents.

Via Seth Dixon
dilaycock's insight:

I've thought the same as Seth about the tours of the rubbish dumps in Manila. Do people go on these tours to become aware of problems in the developing world and to become advocates for improving the issue, or are they just there to see how the other half lives (and to thank their luckstars that "there bit for the grace of God go I")? This article would be a great discussion stimulus for students.

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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 8:36 PM

I don’t find nothing right about tourist visiting the slum, I feel that the tourist are violating there privacy. They are human being not some historical landmark. If the tourist are not helping this people why are they going? If you are going to visit this places do it because you want to help them, not because you think is interesting their way of living.

Cam E's curator insight, April 1, 2014 11:57 AM

Moral questions are always fun. Personally I don't think going to see slums is all that exploitative in itself, but I would make a distinction between guided tours that cost money, and self-directed tours though. In a guided tour you are paying money to walk through a community and view what life is like for those people, but in a self-directed tour you are just another person walking down the streets and viewing whatever you stumble upon. There are plenty of tours within neighborhoods of different economic value the world over, but these tours are scrutinized because the people touring are as wealthy, or less wealthy, than the people living there. I don't think that a poor community changes this dynamic in an immoral way, as the perceptions of which group is superior come from the own minds of those who feel uncomfortable with it.

 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 2014 9:41 AM

This article rises in interesting question.  Are tours of slums exploitive or beneficial to the slum dwellers?  On the one hand the tours could feel like exploitation and the tourist is viewing attractions at a “zoo”, on the other hand it brings people far removed from slum life in contact with it and can change people’s point of view on the slums.  It can be beneficial if the tour guides donate money to the slums or jobs are sought by slum dwellers to become tour guides.  The question is should slums be hidden away from view or opened up to tourists so that they can see the hardships first hand.  I think that this is an issue that is not clearly black or white; there are many shades of gray involved in this issue.

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Booming population worries CM Nitish Kumar - Times of India

Booming population worries CM Nitish Kumar - Times of India | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Booming population worries CM Nitish Kumar
Times of India
Apart from malnutrition and poverty, Kumar said increasing population in the state is a big deterrent to development.
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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

Via Seth Dixon
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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:20 AM

I can't image or even relate to the experience of living in a place like this. With rivers polluted right outside your house. And those rivers are what people bathe in and wash their clothes. I can't imagine not being able to access clean drinking water or lacking food. The people in Dhaka endure so much their whole lives, a good percentage of them will always live in poverty.

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The State of Women in the World

The State of Women in the World | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

Tags: gender, development, worldwide, poverty.


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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 12, 2013 1:39 PM

Gender Development index - CHapter 9 materials

Amy Marques's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:09 AM

This is a great represenaton for showing the unfortunate truth of the state women in the world today.

Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 11:15 AM

Why are women so unequal to men? Why are women in the Middle East seeing such bad treatment and unequality? How can we fix these problems?

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Africa Takes Off

Africa Takes Off | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

Ask this question: Which region of the world currently is the home to 6 of the 10 fastest growing economies?  Most people (myself included) would be surprised to hear that the region is sub-Saharan Africa.  While Sub-Saharan Africa is still the least economically developed region with some very significant challenges, too often Africa is only taught as a region of problems and negative patterns.  

 

Trade between Africa and the rest of the world has tripled in the last decade.  Since 2005, Africa is officially receiving more private foreign investment than official aid.  With many counties "skipping the landline phase" and going straight to cell phone technologies, the rapid acceleration of technology means that they Africa's economic infrastructure has the potential to increase quickly.      


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MDG drinking water target being met is cause for celebration

MDG drinking water target being met is cause for celebration | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Sanjay Wijesekera: This achievement shows that where there is a will, it is possible to truly transform the lives of hundreds of millions of people for the better.

 

The MDG (Millennial Development Goal) to cut the global population that does not have access to clean drinking water was cut in half, and five years ahead of schedule. The World Health Organization and the United Nations are very pleased with this achievement, but it is a timely reminder of the developmental problems of poverty and access that still exist. For example, 783 million people still do not have access to clean drinking water.  3,000 children die each day from diarrheal diseases (usually from bad drinking water and poor sanitation). Although some success should be celebrated, the world, in the currently constituted social, economic and political framework, still does not provide the most basic of requirements for a sizable portion of humanity.


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2011 UN Human Development Report

2011 UN Human Development Report | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
The Human Development Report (HDR) was first launched in 1990 with the single goal of putting people back at the center of the development process in terms of economic debate, policy and advocacy.

 

With a host of links that connect you to videos, charts, statistics about both the present and projections into that future, this is a fantastic resource for any lesson on development. 


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Seth Dixon's comment, December 3, 2011 8:39 AM
Thanks for recooping the link...I think this one will be incredibly valuable.