Geography in the classroom
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Geography in the classroom
Resources to support the NSW secondary Geography curriculum
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Climate Change Threatens an Iconic Desert Tree

Climate Change Threatens an Iconic Desert Tree | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
It’s not just the polar bear. Animals and plants in Earth’s other extreme environment—the desert—are endangered by rising temperatures.
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Gorgeous deserts

Gorgeous deserts | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
View these stunning images of some of the world's driest and most mysterious landscapes.Photo editing by Connie Ricca
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Tuareg nomads should have autonomy, says French minister

Tuareg nomads should have autonomy, says French minister | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
PARIS: Tuaregs in Mali's northern regions should have some autonomy, the French Defence Minister has suggested, while insisting France didn't want to ''dictate'' the nation's constitutional settlement.
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Old Ways Disappearing In The New Mongolia

With desertification, drought and a booming mining industry, Mongolians are leaving the traditional life of herding. Herdsman Bat-Erdene Badam says he will be the last in his family to tend livestock. 

 

How is globalization changing the traditional pastoral society of Mongolia?  As China's industrial production was ballooned, their need for mineral resources has need towards more mining jobs in Mongolia.  For more information and pictures on this topic, see: http://www.npr.org/series/152995168/mongolia-booms


Via Seth Dixon
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‘Population growth far outpaces food supply’ in conflict-ravaged Sahel

‘Population growth far outpaces food supply’ in conflict-ravaged Sahel | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Researchers say conflict and climate change mean the region’s resources will be unable to sustain the increasing population
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Fields of Green Spring up in Saudi Arabia

Fields of Green Spring up in Saudi Arabia | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Saudi Arabia is drilling for a resource possibly more precious than oil by tapping hidden reserves of water in the Syrian Desert.

Via Seth Dixon
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Alex Vielman's curator insight, November 23, 2015 3:37 PM

More and more in the news, people have noticed that oil is the hot topic to discuss. Although oil is a very importance economic source, water is a resource that can sustain the population and keep people alive. Saudi Arabia over the years has developed a huge areas of green fields growing in areas of what is Saudi Arabias desert. Saudi Arabia reaches these underground rivers and lakes by drilling through the desert floor, directly irrigating the fields with a circular sprinkler system. This technique is called center-pivot irrigation. This is so important because even if the country has the money to buy resources like food and water, it is developing these agricultural fields which is allowing them to export products such as wheat, dates, dairy products, eggs, fish, poultry, fruits, vegetables and flowers to markets around the world. Saudi Arabia can now supply its people with these products that they use to import. This is extremely important to the current development in Saudi Arabia. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 7, 2015 4:27 PM

Saudi Arabia is a very rich in drilling industry for oil. However many of these fields are green are popping up all over the place as drilling is occuring. Why is this? Well much of the drilling releases water that is trapped within the rocks. This water then flows to the surface where it creates a underground water puddle that keeps the soils moist which in turn allows for greens and other plants to grow. This is more commonly known as water drilling.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 4:08 PM
These random fields of green are coming from the rocks that still have water that is trapped inside them from the last ice age. Saudi Arabia reaches these underground rivers and lakes by drilling through the desert floor, directly irrigating the fields with a circular sprinkler system. This technique is called center-pivot irrigation. Because of low rainfall, they get minimum water each year. Hydrologists estimate water will only be able to be pumped out for 50 years. With water popping up fields of green, a new agricultural economy will appear, maybe farming life and new resources that the country never had for their people, they will now have.
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Singing Sand Dunes Explained

Singing Sand Dunes Explained | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Marco Polo and others have wondered over the centuries—why makes sand dunes sing? A new study offers a clue.
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Deserts

Deserts | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

From the Department of Biology and Environmental Science at Marietta College. Includes information on climate, vegetation, animal life, and threats.

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