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Geography in the classroom
Resources to support the NSW secondary Geography curriculum
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The changing shape of world demographics

Animating the changing shape of the world population pyramid. For more multimedia content from The Economist visit our website: http://econ.st/1xqEZhX.


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José Antônio Carlos - O Professor Pepe's curator insight, November 26, 2014 7:14 AM

Até a pirâmide demográfica está em crise!

Olivier Tabary's curator insight, November 28, 2014 12:08 PM

Spectacular changes in global demographics, a bit scaring to be honest

Bex Swaney's curator insight, December 5, 2014 12:27 PM

Growth of the ageing population, population change as a whole

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Population pyramids: Powerful predictors of the future

"Population statistics are like crystal balls -- when examined closely, they can help predict a country's future (and give important clues about the past). Kim Preshoff explains how using a visual tool called a population pyramid helps policymakers and social scientists make sense of the statistics, using three different countries' pyramids as examples."


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Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 6:54 PM

This video proves how population pyramids can predict the current and future state of a country such as Rwanda.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:41 PM

Population statistics help show past, present, and future issues and concerns of certain areas ranging from health to women's' issues.

The movement of people in and out of areas affect population statistics and the landscape of areas either positively of negatively.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, September 26, 2014 4:04 PM

Population unit

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Australia: 23 million and counting

Australia: 23 million and counting | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Australia's population will tick past the 23 million mark on Tuesday night as the country continues to grow at the fastest rate in the developed world.
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The state of Australia: our people

The state of Australia: our people | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

Australia is currently the fastest-growing OECD nation. In 2013, Australia’s population grew by 1.8% compared with the OECD average of 0.7%. This is not as high as the 2.2% in 2008, which was the most rapid rate of growth since 1960. However, among Asian countries, only Singapore and Afghanistan have populations that are growing faster....In the lead-up to the budget, the story of crisis has been hammered home, but there’s more to a country than its structural deficit. So how is Australia doing overall?

dilaycock's insight:

Alarming to see that the OECD has declared Australia as one of the world's most obese nations with more than 50% being overweight or obese. The implications for health care, capacity to work are serious.

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Population by Latitude and Longitude

Population by Latitude and Longitude | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Radical Cartography, brought to you by Bill Rankin

Via Seth Dixon
dilaycock's insight:

Interesting stimulus for discussion of why do we live where we live.

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Geoff Findley's curator insight, January 9, 2014 9:37 PM

Cool Cartogram...

 

Keisha Lewis's curator insight, January 12, 2014 8:15 AM

Majorly cool! So many discussions about population distribution can come out of this. :)

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 2014 6:53 PM

We can see that the majority of the world's population is clustered in the mid latitudes in particularly Asia. Showing population in terms of latitude shows how people live based on environmental factors while longitude remains the same throughout, thus showing countries/continents and their rates of population simply based off of that country's growth rate or demographic momentum aside from just looking at climatic preference. For instance, Asia is the most populated area and this is evident because of the current growth rates.