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Geography in the classroom
Resources to support the NSW secondary Geography curriculum
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Population pyramids: Powerful predictors of the future

"Population statistics are like crystal balls -- when examined closely, they can help predict a country's future (and give important clues about the past). Kim Preshoff explains how using a visual tool called a population pyramid helps policymakers and social scientists make sense of the statistics, using three different countries' pyramids as examples."


Via Seth Dixon
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Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 27, 10:31 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the theme of population pyramids because it gives a compelling explanation of how to interpret population pyramids and why they are significant for extrapolating into the future.

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 6:54 PM

This video proves how population pyramids can predict the current and future state of a country such as Rwanda.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:41 PM

Population statistics help show past, present, and future issues and concerns of certain areas ranging from health to women's' issues.

The movement of people in and out of areas affect population statistics and the landscape of areas either positively of negatively.

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Smartphones as geospatial tools

The disastrous earthquake in Haiti taught humanitarian groups an unexpected lesson: the power of mobile devices to coordinate, inform, and guide relief efforts.

 

Tags: technology, disasters, Haiti, TED.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 17, 2013 9:02 PM

We are only beginning to see the applications of smart phones to improve peoples lives.  In this TED talk, Paul Conneally explores some of the possibilities (citizen mapping, crowd-sourced disaster recovery, etc.) that is just sitting in the palm of our collective hands. 

Tony Hall's curator insight, February 18, 2013 6:43 AM

This is why ICT is important. No. Vital! Our students need to see things like this so that they understand the positive aspects of technology. They need to see that SMS, Facebook & Twitter are so much more than just a way sharing silly photos of themselves. This technology has the power to affect real, positive change. 

techsavvygirl's curator insight, February 18, 2013 8:21 AM

Augmenting human potential with smartphones

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Nathalie Miebach: Art made of storms-TED.com

Artist Nathalie Miebach takes weather data from massive storms and turns it into complex sculptures that embody the forces of nature and time. These sculptures then become musical scores for a string quartet to play.
dilaycock's insight:

Wow, this is fascinating. A wonderful intersection of Science and the Arts. The creator's suggestion that her artworks can be shown as artworks, visualisations of data, musical performances etc, highlight the importance of the viewing context.

Thanks Nicole Bailey, Barker College for this link.
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