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Geography in the classroom
Resources to support the NSW secondary Geography curriculum
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The Ganges River Is Dying Under the Weight of Modern India

The Ganges River Is Dying Under the Weight of Modern India | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
The country’s future depends on keeping the holy river alive.

Via Seth Dixon
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Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 14, 2015 1:52 PM

The way the people of India see this river as a gift from the god is truly magnificent. The fact that they use this river for all source of things from cleaning themselves up to washing clothes and drinking from it. One can say that they use as much of the resource as possible but they never care for it in a way. For example excessive use of the river and not cleaning it up, use it for corpse and waste disposal. I wonder how long this can last til the river eventually die.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 7:00 PM

The Ganges River is a place of religion for these people, they see it as a place where they can bathe for the forgiveness of sins and for ancestors alike. The only problem with this really is that it is a very dirty river, sewage and other sorts of waste, germs and disease are running through it. Unfortunately, the people are drinking from this river.  

Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:21 AM

The Ganges River is the most populated region in all of India. The river is sacred and is very holy to the people of India. The river is a religious river in which the people residing in the area use it as a symbolization or purification, life, bathing and drinking. The bigger issue for 'purification' is the fact that the river is very polluted and unsanitary. The pollution not only threatens the people because it could be used for drinking but it also affects the thousands of species, for example fish, that are in the river. The fish could be a source of food for the very overpopulated area but instead the very own people of India are damaging the river. One would think that a river so sacred would be protected and cleaned but it fails to meet these standards. Overall, regardless of the pollution, India still uses it for its religious beliefs and still declare it a holy river. 

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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

Via Seth Dixon
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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:20 AM

I can't image or even relate to the experience of living in a place like this. With rivers polluted right outside your house. And those rivers are what people bathe in and wash their clothes. I can't imagine not being able to access clean drinking water or lacking food. The people in Dhaka endure so much their whole lives, a good percentage of them will always live in poverty.

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South Asia doing worst on UN development goals

South Asia doing worst on UN development goals | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
South Asian nations are making the least progress in the Asia-Pacific region on meeting MDGs, an Asian Development Bank official says...

 

The UN's developmental goals are include reducing child and maternal mortality, halving poverty and hunger, providing universal primary education, gender equality and halting the spread of HIV/AIDS. In the Asia/Pacific region there are 17 countries that are not meeting the goals and all South Asian countries (except Sri Lanka) are labeled as 'off track.'


Via Seth Dixon
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Justin Ng Jie Ern's curator insight, January 20, 2014 10:22 AM

There are about 17 countries who are off-track the Millennium Development Goals. Out of the 17, all South Asian countries are included with the exception of Sri Lanka.

These countries are experiencing poverty and the lack of proper education.

I am worry for these 17 countries, as most of them are undevelop countries. I am afraid that as the world continues to move forward for the better,  these undeveloped countries would get left behind in the process.

I am dissapointed by the fact that some countries' government are not taking the initiative to help the country to stop poverty, and end the misery of these countries.

But i am enlighted and encouraged by the fact that, some of the governments are taking up the initiative to stop poverty. I am also enlighted that these governements are trying their best to improve their education system for young minds too.

In my opinion, all government should take the initiative to clear this obsacle called 'poverty' and help improve their education system, to help educate this country's children.

BrandonTeoZX's curator insight, January 21, 2014 7:41 AM

Reading this article, i feel a bit spoilt. Why? Here i sit, in a comfortable armchair and with a roof over my head, food on the table, clothes to wear, i feel like a king compared to them. People in southeast asia are not doing very well, children having no basic education, people contracting HIV or AIDS easily, some do not even have clean water to drink from. Singapore is a country in Southeast asia, and yet we are one of the world's richest nations, in stark contrast to the other parts of Asia. What can people do about this? What can we do to help? 

jerriel wai's curator insight, January 26, 2014 8:55 AM

connect: The UN has been helping countries facing poverty issues for quite some time now. They are a great corparation that helps

 

extend: I thought they only helped the countries not solve the countries problems. This should be done by the government.  I believe that this can be done by making the government corruption free.

'

challenge: Lets try to stop poverty in south asia, shall we?

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The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism

The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Researchers are heading to Dharavi, Mumbai, to study the impact of slum tours on the residents.

Via Seth Dixon
dilaycock's insight:

I've thought the same as Seth about the tours of the rubbish dumps in Manila. Do people go on these tours to become aware of problems in the developing world and to become advocates for improving the issue, or are they just there to see how the other half lives (and to thank their luckstars that "there bit for the grace of God go I")? This article would be a great discussion stimulus for students.

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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 8:36 PM

I don’t find nothing right about tourist visiting the slum, I feel that the tourist are violating there privacy. They are human being not some historical landmark. If the tourist are not helping this people why are they going? If you are going to visit this places do it because you want to help them, not because you think is interesting their way of living.

Cam E's curator insight, April 1, 2014 11:57 AM

Moral questions are always fun. Personally I don't think going to see slums is all that exploitative in itself, but I would make a distinction between guided tours that cost money, and self-directed tours though. In a guided tour you are paying money to walk through a community and view what life is like for those people, but in a self-directed tour you are just another person walking down the streets and viewing whatever you stumble upon. There are plenty of tours within neighborhoods of different economic value the world over, but these tours are scrutinized because the people touring are as wealthy, or less wealthy, than the people living there. I don't think that a poor community changes this dynamic in an immoral way, as the perceptions of which group is superior come from the own minds of those who feel uncomfortable with it.

 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 2014 9:41 AM

This article rises in interesting question.  Are tours of slums exploitive or beneficial to the slum dwellers?  On the one hand the tours could feel like exploitation and the tourist is viewing attractions at a “zoo”, on the other hand it brings people far removed from slum life in contact with it and can change people’s point of view on the slums.  It can be beneficial if the tour guides donate money to the slums or jobs are sought by slum dwellers to become tour guides.  The question is should slums be hidden away from view or opened up to tourists so that they can see the hardships first hand.  I think that this is an issue that is not clearly black or white; there are many shades of gray involved in this issue.

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The Living Bridge

In North East India just north of Bangladesh is the province of Meghalaya. 

 

This is an astounding video that shows a (literally) natural way that local people have adapted to an incredibly flood-prone environment.  The organic building materials prevent erosion and keep people in contact during times of flood.  The living bridges are truly a sight to behold. 

 

Tags: environment, environment adapt, SouthAsia, water, weather climate, indigenous.

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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 30, 2014 7:51 PM

The people of North East India have found an amazing response to bridge destruction during the annual monsoons. Instead of building bridges year after year, they turn to a more resilient and natural building medium. By spending generations entwining and weaving roots into a specific growth pattern, living bridges span the rivers. A living bridge takes years to accomplish, and families and villages dedicate their lives to taking care of them. The future of the bridges is dependent on the dedication of the youth. As the world's population increasingly moves to urban areas, the fate of the small villages and their natural traditions could be lost. 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 7:46 PM

This video is fascinating. not only does it show the ingenuity of man, but also its care for nature. when Monsoon season comes to the province of Meghalaya, the people use the roots, planted years ago, to form a bridge that allows them to travel back and forth over the river that was caused by the monsoon. If only the entire world could see this video and realize that there are many ways to coexist with nature and that if we take care of nature then it will help take care of us.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 2:30 AM

This is truly an amazing video. It shows the old traditions of the country and how close many of the people are to nature. It seems almost like a fantasy with the growing of these multi-generational living bridges. Especially when compared to many western nations who seem t prefer to keep nature to itself and build up human utilized lands.