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Geography in the classroom
Resources to support the NSW secondary Geography curriculum
Curated by dilaycock
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Providing the toilets people want will help Clean India's campaign

Providing the toilets people want will help Clean India's campaign | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Indian prime minister Narendra Modi has wowed audiences in Australia during his recent visit and used the occasion to remind people of his plan to provide a toilet at home for all Indians by 2019. The…
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With 25 million people, Delhi is facing urbanisation crisis

With 25 million people, Delhi is facing urbanisation crisis | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Cities like Delhi cannot accommodate so many people and are not developing fast enough
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The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism

The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Researchers are heading to Dharavi, Mumbai, to study the impact of slum tours on the residents.

Via Seth Dixon
dilaycock's insight:

I've thought the same as Seth about the tours of the rubbish dumps in Manila. Do people go on these tours to become aware of problems in the developing world and to become advocates for improving the issue, or are they just there to see how the other half lives (and to thank their luckstars that "there bit for the grace of God go I")? This article would be a great discussion stimulus for students.

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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 8:36 PM

I don’t find nothing right about tourist visiting the slum, I feel that the tourist are violating there privacy. They are human being not some historical landmark. If the tourist are not helping this people why are they going? If you are going to visit this places do it because you want to help them, not because you think is interesting their way of living.

Cam E's curator insight, April 1, 11:57 AM

Moral questions are always fun. Personally I don't think going to see slums is all that exploitative in itself, but I would make a distinction between guided tours that cost money, and self-directed tours though. In a guided tour you are paying money to walk through a community and view what life is like for those people, but in a self-directed tour you are just another person walking down the streets and viewing whatever you stumble upon. There are plenty of tours within neighborhoods of different economic value the world over, but these tours are scrutinized because the people touring are as wealthy, or less wealthy, than the people living there. I don't think that a poor community changes this dynamic in an immoral way, as the perceptions of which group is superior come from the own minds of those who feel uncomfortable with it.

 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 9:41 AM

This article rises in interesting question.  Are tours of slums exploitive or beneficial to the slum dwellers?  On the one hand the tours could feel like exploitation and the tourist is viewing attractions at a “zoo”, on the other hand it brings people far removed from slum life in contact with it and can change people’s point of view on the slums.  It can be beneficial if the tour guides donate money to the slums or jobs are sought by slum dwellers to become tour guides.  The question is should slums be hidden away from view or opened up to tourists so that they can see the hardships first hand.  I think that this is an issue that is not clearly black or white; there are many shades of gray involved in this issue.

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Booming population worries CM Nitish Kumar - Times of India

Booming population worries CM Nitish Kumar - Times of India | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Booming population worries CM Nitish Kumar
Times of India
Apart from malnutrition and poverty, Kumar said increasing population in the state is a big deterrent to development.
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Urbanisation and sustainable mobility in India

Urbanisation and sustainable mobility in India | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
As India's population rapidly increases, the need for sustainable urban development and transport must be addressed. Efficiency, cost and employment will all be key factors in this change.
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Urbanisation in India.

Urbanisation in India. | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"As urbanisation picks up pace in India, it poses one of the most serious challenges for the government and planners." 

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Kashmir’s epic floods link India and Pakistan in disaster

Kashmir’s epic floods link India and Pakistan in disaster | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
The Himalayan region's worst floods in more than half a century have prompted a crisis that has fueled a brief thaw in ties between the foes.
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The grind and grief behind the glitter | smh.com.au

The grind and grief behind the glitter | smh.com.au | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

This impoverished district in eastern India has the largest known mica deposits in the world. The mineral here is easily accessible, high quality and in demand from around the world, but the industry here is little better than a black market, depending on an unskilled workforce, forced into working for lower and lower prices. Profits are made off the backs of children.

dilaycock's insight:

A poignant reminder that beauty can come at the expense of others.

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'I was 14 when I was sold'

'I was 14 when I was sold' | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Laxmi's story of being kidnapped and trafficked in Nepal is not an isolated case but, as this graphical account shows, things are not always what they seem.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 23, 2013 4:38 PM

Teaching about human trafficking and child slavery can be very disconcerting and uncomfortable.  How much of the details regarding these horrific situations is age-appropriate and suitable for the classroom?  The BBC is reporting on events with sensitive stories to both give a human face to the story, while protecting the identity of under-aged victims (to read about the production of this comic, read Drawing the News.)  I encourage you to use your own discretion, but I find this comicbook format an accessible, informative and tasteful way to teach about human trafficking in South Asia to minors.  It is a powerful way to teach about some hard (but important) aspects of globalization and economics. 


As geographer Shaunna Barnhart says concerning this comic, "It moves from trafficking to child labor to pressures for migration for wage labor and the resulting injustices that occur. There's differential access to education, gender inequality, land, jobs, and monetary resources that leads to inter- and intra-country trafficking of the vulnerable. In the search for improved quality of life, individuals become part of a global flow of indentured servitude which serves to exploit their vulnerabilities and exacerbate inequalities and injustice. Nepali children 'paid' in food and cell phones that play Hindi music in 'exchange' for work in textile factories - cell phones that are themselves a nexus of global resource chains and textiles which in turn enter a global market - colliding at the site of child labor which remains largely hidden and ignored by those in the Global North who may benefit from such labor."


Tags: Nepal, labor, industry, economic, poverty, globalization, India.


Ssekyewa Charles's curator insight, April 24, 2013 9:03 AM

Where is Human Rights Watch? Human trafficing is a crime to humanity!!

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 11:14 PM

It is sad to see the many different ways the poverty stricken and uneducated regions of the world are exploited, especially the children. Nepal is so poor that most of the recruiters for the predatory foreign networks are often locals who either take their relatives or abductees sent back to find a replacement. The animation helps add clarity and approachability to a bleak and difficult topic.

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Business expertise deployed to develop sustainable cities

Business expertise deployed to develop sustainable cities | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"With over three million people a week migrating to cities, more people than ever are living in urban environments."

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Wanton urbanisation defaces Lahore

Massive migration of people from small towns and cities to Lahore primarily in search of livelihood has resulted in haphazard expansion of the provincial metropolis.
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