Geography in the classroom
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Geography in the classroom
Resources to support the NSW secondary Geography curriculum
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China Drops One-Child Cap After Three Decades to Lift Growth

China Drops One-Child Cap After Three Decades to Lift Growth | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
China’s ruling Communist Party will abandon the one-child policy introduced in the late 1970s to defuse a demographic time bomb that threatens to choke growth in the world’s second biggest economy.
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Sally Egan's curator insight, November 3, 2015 5:45 PM

Great account of teh changed of china's population policy.

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China’s Pearl River Delta overtakes Tokyo as world’s largest megacity

China’s Pearl River Delta overtakes Tokyo as world’s largest megacity | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Several hundred million more people are expected to move to cities in East Asia over the next 20 years as economies shift from agriculture to manufacturing and services, according to a World Bank report

Via Seth Dixon
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Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, April 8, 2015 12:39 PM

APHG- HW Option 7

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 30, 2015 7:28 AM

Pearl river delta

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:13 AM

Cities in this region have experienced spectacular growth; they are at the heart of China's manufacturing and exporting boom.  For example, Shenzen was a small city with about 10,000 residents in 1980 but is now a megacity with over 10 million people.  China's SEZs (Special Economic Zones).  Cities that were once separate entities have coalesced into a large conurbation and if they are counted as one, it's now the largest metropolitan area.  Cities like London and New York become global cities over hundreds of years--this happened in one generation.  Click here for 5 infographics showing East Asia's massive urban growth.      


Tags: APHG, urban, industry, manufacturing, economic, unit 7 cities, megacities, China, East Asia.

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Student Movements: A Subject of Human Geography

Student Movements: A Subject of Human Geography | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
By Sim Tack As student protests in Hong Kong continue, memories of the 1989 Tiananmen Square demonstrations naturally spring to mind. Less iconic but no less notable were the Hungarian Revolution of 1956, which began as a student movement; the 2007 Venezuelan protests, which started with a group of students demanding [...]
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Asia Society Has Opened Window on China's Environment

Asia Society Has Opened Window on China's Environment | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

Since 2007, the China Green project at the Asia Society, based in New York City but with a sizable presence in Hong Kong, has been tracking the mainland's worsening environmental plight." 

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China Has Accomplished Something In Global Trade Not Seen Since Colonial Britain

China Has Accomplished Something In Global Trade Not Seen Since Colonial Britain | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"China is a true mega-trader — a position last held by colonial Britain, with trade significant not only as a share of world trade (11.5%) but also of its own GDP (47%).  The U.S. is China's top export destination. China's trade with Latin America has risen more than 200 times since 1990 and is the fastest-growing corridor. China's trade is beginning to slow, however. Exports accounted for about 25% of GDP in 2012, down from 35% in 2007." 


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Sean Goins's curator insight, November 13, 2014 1:31 PM

in the global market, china has become the rising power in the exporting market with latin america which has risen more than 200 times since 1990 and is the fastest, but has also slowed down in more recent times but is still one of the largest exporters in the world

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 10:38 PM

A new Standard Chartered report by Madhur Jha and other Standard Chartered economists, titled "Global Trade Unbundled," highlights just how much of a trading giant China has become. "China is a true mega trader-- a position last held by colonial Britain, with trade significant not only as a share of world trade but also of its own GDP", according to Jha. "China will likely become a champion of free trade." In 2013, China topped the United States for the first time. China's imports and exports of goods amounted to $4.16 trillion dollars. The United States is China's top destination for exports. This is obvious because if we look on half the items we use daily, they probably say "Made in China". China's exports with Latin America and Africa are still continuing to grow rapidly. Jha and others believe that China will remain the top trader mostly because the economic recovery is a positive for China. Also because a lot of attention is paid towards exports from China rather than imports. China's trade rates are likely to keep growing at a steady pace.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:17 AM

This article is highlights what we already know; China is a dominant force in global trade (although the map should be centered on the Pacific to show China's real shipping lanes and interregional connections).  Containers are symbols of global commerce that enable economies of scale to be profitable and the outsourcing of so many manufacturing jobs to developing countries (almost 90% of everything we buy arrives via ship).  The invention of these containers have changed the geography of global shipping and the vast majority of the world's largest ports are now in East Asia. 


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Too good to be true: weighing up Australia's exposure to China

Too good to be true: weighing up Australia's exposure to China | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Australia exported A$94.4 billion in goods to China last year, making China by far the single most important destination for Australian merchandise. Similarly, China is also the most important destination…
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Does Australia's trade relationship with China represent a double-edged sword?

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China's urban explosion: 'Sim City' on steroids

China's urban explosion: 'Sim City' on steroids | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
More than half of China's population now lives in cities but the push to urbanize has had mixed results.
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The costs and benefits of China's one-child policy

The costs and benefits of China's one-child policy | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
The recent announcement that China’s one-child policy will be partially relaxed will be celebrated worldwide by libertarians, human rights activists and, most importantly, Chinese couples who have longed…...
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Like Its Neighbors, China Struggles With an Aging Population

Like Its Neighbors, China Struggles With an Aging Population | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
With China's population likely to start declining after 2020, expect to see changes in the one-child policy
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China’s Great Uprooting: Moving 250 Million Into Cities

China’s Great Uprooting: Moving 250 Million Into Cities | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
A 12-year plan to move hundreds of millions of rural residents into cities is intended to spur economic growth, but could have unintended consequences, skeptics warn.
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Amanda Donecoff's comment, July 15, 2013 12:39 AM
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Amanda Donecoff's comment, July 15, 2013 1:24 AM
The people of China are on a downward slope, even though they are in a process of so much production. Their government has too much power and the people don't have enough say. The urbanization process in place is just another way to stop the people from speaking out or even inquiring about their own opinion. Moving everyone into cities is not going to help China expand or grow as much as they need to as a people in the long run. When you change someone into something they're clearly not, they can never aspire to their true potential. The country of China wants to prosper, but contradicts itself because the government is trying to take away a part of life that has been known to man for as long as anyone could probably remember, which is country; the rural lands that have always run across the Earth. The control and power that China is trying to acquire is not coming easy enough to them because they are too independent. They need to let places like the U.S. help build them and inspire them. Also, their plan for complete city life is not moving fast enough. People are unemployed and financially hurt. Even in 2025, people will continue to hurt and regret the decisions made. Sometimes the government can seem cold and unfeeling because they don't take all of the factors into consideration that they need to so they can thrive. Eventually, people need to come out and make decisions that are risky and outside the box to change the direction that their country is being led into. If China does not stop trying to control their people, and push them all into the city rather than the farming country, it could potentially become a place where people would rather die than be who they are. A great example of this is Foxconn. Many children have committed suicide because of the pressure put on them. Unfortunately, China chose the wrong solution. They didn't actually fix the core of the problem. Putting nets up around the buildings stopped some of the deaths, but it doesn't stop the workers or children from feeling so worthless that they shouldn't exist. China needs to make changes for their morality and for their future as a country with a lot of promise and potential. China and all of its people just need to use their power and ability for the right reasons, in the right ways.
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China's cities get eco-smart, what can Australia learn?

China's cities get eco-smart, what can Australia learn? | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
China is urbanising faster than any other country in history. It now has 120 cities with over one million people and 36 cities with over two million.
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China plans bond overhaul to fund $6.4tn urbanisation

China plans bond overhaul to fund $6.4tn urbanisation | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
China plans major bond market reform to raise the money the ruling Communist Party needs for a 40tn yuan ($6.4tn) urbanisation programme to...
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Birds, dams and people: biodiversity in China

Birds, dams and people: biodiversity in China | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
The 2012 China Ecological Footprint Report has highlighted the cost to biodiversity of China’s rapid economic development.Biodiversity in China is under pressure because of loss of habitat.
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China's growth taking a toll on the environment - YouTube

Kristie Lu Stout explores how China may reform environmental policy with Qi Ye of the Brookings-Tsinghua Center for Public Policy
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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, November 6, 2015 6:21 PM

Consequences of urbanisation

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Urbanisation

Urbanisation | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
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A number of audio and video resources on urbanisation in China.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 11, 2015 2:02 AM

A series of short videos covering many aspects of the CHanging Nations / Changing Places (NSW) Units e.g. China's Internal Migration, Shanghai, Mumbai. 


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China's Answer To Its Poverty Of Space: Moving Mountains

China's Answer To Its Poverty Of Space: Moving Mountains | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Near the city of Lanzhou, in the mountains of central China, as far as eyesight can carry, the tortured hills are barren. Dozens of excavators claw through the dirt and giant heavy-duty trucks on makeshift roads groan under the strain as they move earth and stone past dormitories of corrugated [...]
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Interesting article about Chinese efforts to move mountains in order to create flat land for residential areas.

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Where China and Kazakhstan Meet

Where China and Kazakhstan Meet | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"While people often say that borders aren’t visible from space, the line between Kazakhstan and China could not be more clear in this satellite image. Acquired by the Landsat 8 satellite on September 9, 2013, the image shows northwestern China around the city of Qoqek and far eastern Kazakhstan near Lake Balqash.

The border between the two countries is defined by land-use policies. In China, land use is intense. Only 11.62 percent of China’s land is arable. Pressed by a need to produce food for 1.3 billion people, China farms just about any land that can be sustained for agriculture. Fields are dark green in contrast to the surrounding arid landscape, a sign that the agriculture is irrigated. As of 2006, about 65 percent of China’s fresh water was used for agriculture, irrigating 629,000 square kilometers (243,000 square miles) of farmland, an area slightly smaller than the state of Texas.

The story is quite different in Kazakhstan. Here, large industrial-sized farms dominate, an artifact of Soviet-era agriculture. While agriculture is an important sector in the Kazakh economy, eastern Kazakhstan is a minor growing area. Only 0.03 percent of Kazakhstan’s land is devoted to permanent agriculture, with 20,660 square kilometers being irrigated. The land along the Chinese border is minimally used, though rectangular shapes show that farming does occur in the region. Much of the agriculture in this region is rain-fed, so the fields are tan much like the surrounding natural landscape."

 

Tags: remote sensing, land use, environment, geospatial, environment modify, food, agriculture, agricultural land change.


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Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, April 15, 2015 10:24 AM

It is amazing what irrigation can produce.  The border between China and Kazakhstan is a perfect picture of land with irrigation and one without supplied water.  Eastern Kasakhstan has farmland but it is only subsidized by natural rainfall whereas on the greener Chinese side of the border it is supplemented with water by the farmers.  Great picture!

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 2015 12:00 PM

Seeing such a striking difference between two countries that are so close together is strange and thought-provoking. Knowing a little bit about the two countries can make a world of difference, though. In this case, we have China and Kazakhstan, two countries located in East/Central Asia. Kazakhstan borders China to the west, along the northern part of its western border. Much of China's inland land use is devoted to agriculture, as the majority of its industry is located near its coast. This is evident by the amount of green space seen in the satellite image above. With well over a billion people to feed, China needs to make use of as much of its arable land as possible. Kazakhstan, on the other hand is a much smaller country with much less land devoted to agriculture. Its farmland is mostly large and industrial, as a result of Soviet-era farming and is rain-fed rather than irrigated, like China's.

 

Knowing the history as well as the economic strengths of a country can therefore be useful in interpreting satellite images such as the one in this article. A lack of knowledge about China and Kazakhstan's economy and history may lead to an assumption that the Chinese are just better farmers than the Kazakhs. This is of course not necessarily true, but what is true is that China has a much larger and more immediate need for agriculture than does Kazakhstan and so devotes more of its land, time, and energy to farming. Likewise, it shouldn't be assumed that Kazakhstan has no need for agriculture at all. Instead, its history has largely influenced its economic strengths and needs, and the result is a country that looks very different from China. 

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 19, 2015 12:41 PM

It's crazy to see how much human influences can reshape the landscape, or how things we tend to think of in more abstract terms- like national boundaries- can be very physical in nature. I liked reading about the differing agricultural approaches the two nations take, and being able to see the physical manifestations of those two different approaches so obviously. It's impressive to think that China is able to support such a massive population- one in every 5 people alive on the planet is Chinese- with so little land, and the consequences are plain to see in the image above. Increased irrigation efforts leads to the unnaturally bright green patches in the middle of a relatively dry area, serving as a symbol of man's attempts to bind mother nature to his will. Although not always successful, such attempts appear to be working well here. In contrast, Kazakhstan's population demands vary wildly from that of China's, and its solution for feeding its people can therefore take a more natural, backroads approach, with food production concentrated in a few areas. I wonder what other international borders can be seen so neatly with the naked eye.

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Chinese Monks Get Martial to Defend Against Terrorism

Chinese Monks Get Martial to Defend Against Terrorism | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

At the 1,700-year-old Lingyin Temple in Hangzhou, a 45-member team (including 20 monks and all 25 security guards) has been organized to combat possible terror attacks. The move at Lingyin Temple in Hangzhou comes after the March 1 attack in Kunming Train Station.

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China's Empty Cities House 64 Million Empty Apartments - YouTube

"Vast new cities are being built across China at a rate of ten a year, but they remain almost completely uninhabited ghost towns. Racing to stay ahead of the world economy, is the superpower about to implode?" 

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Shanghai's 'airpocalypse': can China fix its deadly pollution?

Shanghai's 'airpocalypse': can China fix its deadly pollution? | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
The current “airpocolypse” emergency in Shanghai - which has seen schoolchildren ordered indoors to protect them from the polluted air, flights grounded and companies ordered to cut production - comes…...
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The downside of China's rapid industrialisation.

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The urbanisation of rural China

The urbanisation of rural China | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
The Chinese government plans to move 250 million people from farms to cities over the next 12 to 15 years.
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Tom Tyndall's curator insight, April 19, 2014 2:48 AM

Internal Migration within China is a feature of their growth.

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Infographic for China's Urbanisation | NOST China news

Infographic for China's Urbanisation | NOST China news | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
untitled Here is an infographic for China's Urbanisation produced by the EU-funded Dragon-STAR project. China's urbanisation over the past three decades is a massive phenomenon of scale and speed. In the 1980's, there ...
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François Arnal's curator insight, September 26, 2013 2:54 AM

L'urbanisation de la Chine au cours des dernières décennies  est un phénomène massif par son  l'échelle et par sa vitesse. Dans les années 1980, dans une  Chine très "différente", il y avait moins de 200 millions de  personnes classées en population «urbaine» (un cinquième de la population totale). Cependant, d'ici 2011, 700 millions (la moitié de la population totale) vit dans les zones urbaines, tandis que la  population urbaine va continuer à croître dans le futur car on s'attend à 250 millions de travailleurs migrants  se déplaçant vers les villes d'ici 2030.

L'urbanisation, en Chine, est contrôlé par le système du hukou, un système d'enregistrement des ménages introduit en 1958. Le système du hukou lie juridiquement les travailleurs migrants à leur domicile en milieu rural et a été conçu pour garder les résidents ruraux travaillant sur l'exploitation.

La question de l'urbanisation est un élément clé dans les dicussions bilatérales sino-européennes et est également un domaine d'intérêt pour DRAGON-STAR.

Sally Egan's curator insight, October 4, 2013 1:31 AM

Amazing statistics on the urbanisationof China. A fascinating read to supplement work on global population studues.

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World’s Largest Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Planned for China

World’s Largest Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Planned for China | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Lockheed Martin and the Reignwood Group are to partner on a 10MW OTEC facility off the coast of coast of Southern China.
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China's planners push urbanisation as main growth driver | Reuters

China's planners push urbanisation as main growth driver | Reuters | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
BEIJING (Reuters) - China's planned urbanisation drive will be main engine of growth for domestic economic activity in the years ahead, giving the government scope to boost domestic demand and infrastructure...
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China Vehicle Population Hits 240 Million as Smog Engulfs Cities

China Vehicle Population Hits 240 Million as Smog Engulfs Cities | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
China added more cars last year than the total number plying its roads in 1999, illustrating the challenges the government faces in controlling vehicular emissions and traffic congestion in its cities.
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