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Geography in the classroom
Resources to support the NSW secondary Geography curriculum
Curated by dilaycock
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"Thinking like a Geographer" (OFFICIAL MUSIC VIDEO)

WARNING! This video contains explicit geographical scenes that may offend the non-worldy-wise.
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Marie Danner's comment, September 2, 2013 9:26 AM
I really enjoyed this video because it was entertaining and informative at the same time. So many videos try to pack in information but they are unable to keep you excited about the video to where you stay energetic. This video helped a lot in keeping me energetic and ready to learn about what they had to say.
Kyle Camper's comment, September 8, 2013 10:25 AM
This song was actually really entertaining, catchy, and knowledgeable. If all lessons were taught like this, I would have an easier time in school. Music is fun.
Isabella DeStasio's comment, September 9, 2013 7:27 PM
This is a nice way to get people's attention and especially kids in school. If you listen to the words he is saying and the statements he's making they are actually very interesting and knowledgeable. I think if school was this interesting everyone would listen a little more then they do now.
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Why Sydney is on course to lose its status as Australia's biggest city

Why Sydney is on course to lose its status as Australia's biggest city | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
The Bureau of Statistics predicted Melbourne’s population will overtake Sydney’s by 2053. Other forecasters reckon the Victorian capital’s numerical ascendancy could arrive by the late 2030s or even earlier.
dilaycock's insight:

It's all about geography, planning and the location of the CBD.

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Air Pollution Killed 7 Million in 2012, According to WHO

Air Pollution Killed 7 Million in 2012, According to WHO | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

The Industrial Revolution may seem like a thing of the past to residents of developed countries, but those who live in developing countries are still very much in the thick of it. Air pollution claimed 7 million lives in 2012, according to a report just released by the World Health Organization, with the vast majority of deaths occurring in low- and middle-income countries.

One out of every eight premature deaths in 2012 was attributable to air pollution, the numbers reveal — a rate double that reported in previous years due to more accurate measures of pollution in both outdoor and indoor environments and in a broader range of rural areas.

The numbers also reveal that the link between air pollution and cardiovascular disease and cancer is even stronger than previously believed. A recent analysis of life expectancy in more and less polluted regions of China also suggested that air quality levies a high tax on health than documented in prior studies.

“The risks from air pollution are now far greater than previously thought or understood, particularly for heart disease and strokes. Few risks have a greater impact on global health today than air pollution,” Maria Neira, director of the WHO’s Department of Public Health, Environmental and Social Determinants of Health, said in a news release.


Via Wildcat2030
dilaycock's insight:

Alarming statistics from the World Health Organisation. This is something that can be, and must be, addressed.

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World Health Day - Take a Trip to Ghana and Catalyse Change

World Health Day - Take a Trip to Ghana and Catalyse Change | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

Today is World Health Day - an event in the annual calender to remind us all of the importance, and inequalities, in health as well as healthcare access around the world. 

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Eruption fears as Ecuador's 'throat of fire' volcano spews ash, smoke

Eruption fears as Ecuador's 'throat of fire' volcano spews ash, smoke | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
A volcano in central Ecuador has spewed up a column of hot ash and smoke 10 kilometres high, increasing fears of an eruption.
dilaycock's insight:

Seems the Pacific Ring of Fire is restless!

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Chinese Monks Get Martial to Defend Against Terrorism

Chinese Monks Get Martial to Defend Against Terrorism | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

At the 1,700-year-old Lingyin Temple in Hangzhou, a 45-member team (including 20 monks and all 25 security guards) has been organized to combat possible terror attacks. The move at Lingyin Temple in Hangzhou comes after the March 1 attack in Kunming Train Station.

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New Photos of Uncontacted Amazon Tribe Stir Uproar

New Photos of Uncontacted Amazon Tribe Stir Uproar | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Pressure from loggers, gold prospectors, and land speculators endangers many of the world's last remaining uncontacted indigenous communities.
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Terrifying Animation Shows How Chile’s Tsunami Took Over the Entire Pacific Ocean | Science | WIRED

Terrifying Animation Shows How Chile’s Tsunami Took Over the Entire Pacific Ocean | Science | WIRED | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
This time-lapse animation simulates how waves caused by the magnitude 8.2 earthquake in Chile on April 1 spread across the Pacific Ocean over 30 hours. The animation really highlights the reach of a dangerous tsunami.
dilaycock's insight:

Excellent animation to show how extensive the effects of the Chilean earthquake were, and, with an increase in magnitude, how devastating the effects could have been for some Pacific nations.

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Earthquakes in the Classroom

"An 8.2-magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of northern Chile, generating a local tsunami.  The USGS reported the earthquake was centered 95 km (59 miles) northwest of Iquique at a depth of 20.1km (12.5 miles).  This video gives the context for this type of earthquake."  


Via Seth Dixon
dilaycock's insight:

From Seth Dixon: 

 "IRIS(Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) creates teaching resources for teachers who want to use the current events such as yesterday's earthquake in Chile as an opportunity to discuss earth's physical systems and how they impact humanity.  They've produces slides, animations and PDFs for classroom use all while you were sleeping last night."  

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 2, 11:09 AM

I woke up this morning to news of a large earthquake in Chile (security camera video footage).  IRIS (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) creates teaching resources for teachers who want to use the current events such as yesterday's earthquake in Chile as an opportunity to discuss earth's physical systems and how they impact humanity.  They've produces slides, animations and PDFs for classroom use all while you were sleeping last night.  


Tags: visualization, disasters, physical, Chile.

Geofreak's curator insight, April 3, 1:37 PM

Hoe ontstond deze tsunami precies?

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, April 5, 10:52 AM

http://www.iris.edu/hq/programs/education_and_outreach/resources

 

Lesson Plans from the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS)

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Whaling in the Antarctic: Japan's scientific program illegal

Whaling in the Antarctic: Japan's scientific program illegal | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Japan’s Southern Ocean “scientific” whaling program is contrary to international law, the International Court of Justice found last night after a four week trial between Australia and Japan in June last…
dilaycock's insight:

A win in the short-term, but unfortunately the ban refers to the current whaling program and does not prevent Japan developing future "scientific" programs.

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7 Key Findings From the New UN Climate Science Report

7 Key Findings From the New UN Climate Science Report | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Seven key findings from the new report out of the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, including sea level rise and food security projections.
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McCrindle Research shows what Australia would look like if entire country shrunk to size of one street

McCrindle Research shows what Australia would look like if entire country shrunk to size of one street | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
IF AUSTRALIA was condensed to a single street of 100 households it would have 260 people and 252 fish.
dilaycock's insight:

Love this! The accompanying infographic is great.

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Coal seam gas water leaks could be a problem for decades

Coal seam gas water leaks could be a problem for decades | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Recently reported leaks of water containing high levels of radioactive uranium from a coal seam gas (CSG) wastewater pond operated by Santos in New South Wales put the spotlight on an industry already…
dilaycock's insight:

Check the related articles on coal seam gas mining.

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Tracey M Benson's curator insight, March 25, 5:16 PM

Interesting article about some of the big issues posed by fracking 

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Plane Search Shows World's Oceans Are Full of Trash

Plane Search Shows World's Oceans Are Full of Trash | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Before Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 went missing, sea trash was not a global headliner.
dilaycock's insight:

While there's been little success in the the search for Flight 370, it has at least highlighted a problem that until now has been sadly overlooked.

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The Town that is Literally Living Under a Rock

The Town that is Literally Living Under a Rock | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"People choose to live in some pretty baffling places, like those towns sitting at the base of volcanos or the precariously placed monasteries in the Himalayan mountains. Here’s one that looks like it might have been hit by a meteor and residents just decided to carry on as usual…Welcome to the town of Setenil de las Bodegas in Spain, where around 3,000 inhabitants are living quite literally, under a rock."


Via Seth Dixon
dilaycock's insight:

An extreme example of the built environment working with the natural one. I don't think, however, that I'd be able to sleep well with this very visible weight hanging over my head! 

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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, April 16, 5:56 PM

these places are so beautiful! We forget how beautiful the natural environment really is.

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Aerial Photographs Catalogue the Life and Death of Volcanic Islands

Aerial Photographs Catalogue the Life and Death of Volcanic Islands | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

Volcanic islands can seem to appear out of nowhere, emerging from the ocean like breaching monsters of the deep. Below, Mika McKinnon explains how these odd geological formations are born, how they evolve, and how they eventually vanish back beneath the waves.


Via Seth Dixon
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PIRatE Lab's curator insight, April 7, 11:50 AM

Darwin was the first to bring an academic overview to the formation of these coral-harboring islands but the beauty and diversity were really first brought home with free aerial imagery (ala Google Earth, etc.).


Where an island is along this developmental continuum says much about the human populations that may inhabit said island.  If the island is tall and young with rich volcanic soil, the mountain will attract rainfall and the soil could support agriculture, making the island able to sustain a higher population density.  On the other hand, an old, eroding island with little rainfall and depleted soils will need human inhabitants to rely on the ocean's resources for food and would thus support a more minimal population.  These islands are changing, even if the time scale is slow--but just recently two disconnected islands 'merged' as growing volcanic island has expanded in the Pacific.

Tracey M Benson's curator insight, April 7, 5:15 PM

Insight from Seth Dixon:

Where an island is along this developmental continuum says much about the human populations that may inhabit said island.  If the island is tall and young with rich volcanic soil, the mountain will attract rainfall and the soil could support agriculture, making the island able to sustain a higher population density.  On the other hand, an old, eroding island with little rainfall and depleted soils will need human inhabitants to rely on the ocean's resources for food and would thus support a more minimal population.  These islands are changing, even if the time scale is slow--but just recently two disconnected islands 'merged' as growing volcanic island has expanded in the Pacific. 

Helen Rowling's curator insight, April 17, 4:55 PM

Geographical wonders.

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Whose job is it to clear up all the rubbish floating in the oceans?

Whose job is it to clear up all the rubbish floating in the oceans? | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
I was in the middle of giving a talk on the marine debris problem at a notable Californian marine research institute, when I drank the last of my water bottle, threw it onto the hall floor from the podium…
dilaycock's insight:

I like the practical way the author introduced the topic of ocean debris to his audience.

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What Caused the Chilean Earthquake? Faults Explained

What Caused the Chilean Earthquake? Faults Explained | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
What was that you felt? Faults deep underground produce different kinds of earthquakes.
dilaycock's insight:

Good explanation, with video, of the different movements in the earth's crust that cause earthquakes

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Lebanon's Population of Syrian War Refugees Is Now Over One Million

Lebanon's Population of Syrian War Refugees Is Now Over One Million | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Lebanon, a small sliver of a country with a population of just 4.5 million people, is also the temporary home of 1 million registered refugees from Syria.
dilaycock's insight:

Lebanon now has the world's highest per capita concentration of refugees.

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Sustainable Resource Development in the Himalayas - Geology for Global Development

Sustainable Resource Development in the Himalayas - Geology for Global Development | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Geology for Global Development exists to raise the profile of international development within the geosciences community, focusing on students and recent graduates.
dilaycock's insight:

In June 2014 a conference will take place in Leh (Ladakh Region, India) with a focus on sustainable resource development in the Himalayas. Part of the conference will be a two-day student's forum for Ladahki students focused on Hazards Education. This website has some excellent resources on the effect of landslides in Ladhak, and on the social and economic circumstances of the Ladkahi people.

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The difficulty of searching for MH370 in a giant rubbish patch

The difficulty of searching for MH370 in a giant rubbish patch | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

Frustratingly, the search for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 has turned up many floating objects, but none of them are from the plane. 

dilaycock's insight:

The search for MH370 has highlighted the issue of accumulated debris in the oceans.  

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Logging and Mudslides

Logging and Mudslides | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
In recent decades the state allowed logging — with restrictions — on the plateau above the Snohomish County hillside that collapsed in last weekend’s deadly mudslide.

Via Seth Dixon
dilaycock's insight:

Illustrates the combination of natural processes and human activity.

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Geofreak's curator insight, April 3, 1:39 PM

Mijnbouw en aardverschuivingen, een goede combinatie ...... 

PIRatE Lab's curator insight, April 7, 11:48 AM

There are several reasons for mudslides--some are purely a result of physical geography and others are related to land use patterns.  This last week's mudslide in Washington state was a combination of the two and although this impacts one place (see on map), it is a good teaching moment to discuss the environmental impacts of land use patterns and resource extraction projects.  As seen in this interactive, the river was cutting at the base of the hill, while loggers were clear-cutting at the top of the mountain.  Trees help prevent erosion as the roots hold the soil in place--a critical piece to the puzzle in a very rainy climate.  With $1 million worth of timber on the slope, logging companies persisted despite objections from the Department of Natural Resources and some restrictions (but in hindsight, those restrictions clearly were not enough). 

 

View the impact in ArcGIS online: Before and After Swipe, LiDAR I and II, and Imagery.

 

Questions to Consider: Other than economic worth, what other ways are there to value and evaluate the environment?  How could this landscape have been protected and managed better or was this mudslide inevitable?   

El Futuro deWaukesha's curator insight, April 18, 12:03 AM

Working on an Inquiry of recent natural disasters with first grader.  

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How wetlands can help us adapt to rising seas

How wetlands can help us adapt to rising seas | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Instead of costly levees and seawalls, coastal ecosystems could offer an alternative way to protect Australia’s coastal communities from rising seas, saving money and storing carbon along the way. Sea…
dilaycock's insight:

Working with nature to reduce the impact of a rising sea level.

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How to create wealth from waste and reduce our landfill

How to create wealth from waste and reduce our landfill | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
While Australia’s rich stocks of raw mineral resources have contributed to the nation’s wealth and given us a competitive advantage we are also one of the highest waste producing nations in the world (on…
dilaycock's insight:

It's time to look on the mountains of rubbish going into landfill as "urban mines."

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Malala speaks for silenced children

Malala speaks for silenced children | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Although shot and almost killed by the Taliban for advocating education for girls, schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai has...
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Inspirational words from a 16 year-old regarding the right to education for children.

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The battle over Abbot Point risks losing the Great Barrier Reef war

The battle over Abbot Point risks losing the Great Barrier Reef war | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
“Save the reef” has become a popular catch-cry among many environment groups, with Greenpeace’s Great Barrier Reef website shared more than 125,000 times on social media to date. It and many similar campaigns…
dilaycock's insight:

Alternate perspective on the concerns over dredging at Abbot Point.

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