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Population 4

Population 4 | Geography in news | Scoop.it

"Maps Of U.S. Population Change, 2000-2010.  Blue is population increase, red represents population decline."


Via Seth Dixon
Whitney Souery's insight:

Detroit has an increasing population, along with the outskirts of Chicago (suburbs). This  increasing population represents areas that are prospering  because of economic factors. Just as some businesses in Detroit are coming back, businesses in the suburbs in Chicago are also growing, contributing to an increasing population as well. This map reflects economic and social factors (ethnicity) in the present and can be used to get an understanding of America's population growth/decline. 

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Linda Alexander's curator insight, May 8, 9:55 AM

This series of maps show the population patterns impacting the United States.  

Kate Buckland's curator insight, May 17, 8:01 PM

The donut effect!

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:38 PM

These maps show the changes of urban areas in America and the patterns and problems each one goes through.

These human places go through similar development patterns and all focus economically but still have different landscapes as a place.

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Rescooped by Whitney Souery from Geography Education
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Population 4

Population 4 | Geography in news | Scoop.it

"Maps Of U.S. Population Change, 2000-2010.  Blue is population increase, red represents population decline."


Via Seth Dixon
Whitney Souery's insight:

Detroit has an increasing population, along with the outskirts of Chicago (suburbs). This  increasing population represents areas that are prospering  because of economic factors. Just as some businesses in Detroit are coming back, businesses in the suburbs in Chicago are also growing, contributing to an increasing population as well. This map reflects economic and social factors (ethnicity) in the present and can be used to get an understanding of America's population growth/decline. 

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Linda Alexander's curator insight, May 8, 9:55 AM

This series of maps show the population patterns impacting the United States.  

Kate Buckland's curator insight, May 17, 8:01 PM

The donut effect!

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:38 PM

These maps show the changes of urban areas in America and the patterns and problems each one goes through.

These human places go through similar development patterns and all focus economically but still have different landscapes as a place.

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Industrialization and Economic Development 2

Industrialization and Economic Development 2 | Geography in news | Scoop.it
A short article on the U.S. dollar's influence around the world.
Whitney Souery's insight:

The dollar plays an underestimated role in the world. The dollar is also no longer specific to the US, as it is now the currency in multiple countries along with being a staple of world economics. We see the dollar holding the world together, the driving fire of capitalism, similar to Wallerstein's theory of capitalism being the main force that propels our economy to expand. As such, the US is this force that Wallerstein identified and thus carries a heavy influence across the world. 

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cities and urban land use 4

cities and urban land use 4 | Geography in news | Scoop.it
Article on the 140th anniversary of the Chicago Fire focusing on city planning and the "Great Rebuilding."
Whitney Souery's insight:

Another collection of pictures, this collection best shows the change over time factor in determining how cities grow and change. After the Great Chicago fire, Chicago's cultural landscape changed to reflect a rebuilding process post-Chicago Fire. In general, cities usually change as a result of changing economic factors or immigration/emigration patterns. In this case, Chicago underwent a forced change which forced it to adapt to the times. 

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Cities and Urban Land use 3

Cities and Urban Land use 3 | Geography in news | Scoop.it
City planners grapple with urbanization in India.
Whitney Souery's insight:

Taken from India, we can see the effects of overcrowding and urban sprawl on the cultural landscape of cities. A closer analysis of this picture shows a lack of telephone lines, and small, closely clustered buildings, a far cry from Suburbia and the world of America's cities. As a developing country, India has faced lots of rural to urban migration which has forced the city to grow on top of itself. 

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Geography: its nature and perspectives

Geography: its nature and perspectives | Geography in news | Scoop.it
And it needs to stop.

Via Seth Dixon
Whitney Souery's insight:

If this is the only way to get people interested in thinking geographically, then I think it shouldn't stop.However, if we were to work and improve the geographic thinking of US citizens, it would probably be best to map these topics on a global scale rather than simply emphasizing the well known geography of the US. With that said, Americans obsession with mapping "trivial" topics does inspire an interest in geography. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 13, 9:25 PM

This may seem like the wrong place to be saying this, but any cartophile with an abiding love for a truly fantastic map will know that there are an amazing number of horrible maps out there.  This is a nice, thoughtful article explaining some reasons for the problem and how to become a more discerning consumer of maps and visual information. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 18, 11:40 AM

unit 1 bad bad maps

Mary Elizabeth's curator insight, August 31, 1:16 PM

nothing makes kids pay attention like food

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Geography's nature and perspectives 3

Geography's nature and perspectives 3 | Geography in news | Scoop.it
No matter where you are on the planet, you're never more than 5,000 miles from a Starbucks.

Via Mrs. B
Whitney Souery's insight:

Before reading this article, I knew that Starbucks was a big deal, especially in New York City but I wasn't sure about the rest of the world. Canada trails behind the United States with  China behind that. Mapping Starbucks locations allows people to see the spatial aspect of stores and to further understand why specific countries have so many Starbucks, be it an economic or social factor.

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Political Geography 4

Political Geography 4 | Geography in news | Scoop.it
China has confronted several of its neighbors in disputes over territory. During a speech at West Point on Wednesday, President Obama spoke of accepting Chinese power — but also limiting it.
Whitney Souery's insight:

After WWII in particular, world powers in particular realized how important it was to preserve a balance of power. Any country that tries to exert excessive power or control will face consequences as the rest of the world is eager to preserve that balance, condemning expansionist policies. The US is currently concerned about China's territorial clashes with its neighbors which could potentially upset the balance of power. 

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Population 5

Population 5 | Geography in news | Scoop.it
An Italian crackdown on illegal immigrants has not stopped disillusioned young people in post-revolutionary Tunisia seeking a better life in Europe, writes Louise Sherwood
Whitney Souery's insight:

People from Tunisia are looking for a better life in Italy, risking everything that they have just to get a job. However, getting to the final destination (Italy) from Tunisia is very dangerous because the risk of being deported is high. Despite this, immigration is still popular because conditions in Tunisia are poor, leading to a depleted male population and change in the population structure. 

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Agricultural and Rural land use 4

Agricultural and Rural land use 4 | Geography in news | Scoop.it
There are calls to better label halal food in the UK, but how does it differ from other meat and why is it controversial?
Whitney Souery's insight:

In APHG, we studied the effects of culture on diet, such as that seen in Islamic and Jewish cultures. In Islamic culture, halal food refers to meat that is permitted for Muslims to eat because it has gone through a special process. However, labeling is a topic of controversy along with the question of whether halal foods can be stunned before slaughter. This is the beginning of an extensive chapter of the relationship between agriculture and culture. 

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Political Organization of Space 3

Political Organization of Space 3 | Geography in news | Scoop.it
A brief overview of crimes against geography in the 113th Congress.

Via Seth Dixon
Whitney Souery's insight:

Gerrymandering is an essential part of the study of human geography and shows how congressional districts may not necessarily be gerrymandered just to eliminate the minority vote but to perhaps improve the vote of social groups that are most often underrepresented. Gerrymandering, however, most often as the connotation of being to gain a majority when it otherwise would not be possible or group a minority population with a majority to predict a clear voting outcome. 

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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 10:04 AM

This concept is used to favor certain political parties in certain areas. There are rules like the ditrict has to be all connected but they can manipulate the redrawing to make it that a certain party still wins that district.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:29 PM

A showing of the gerrymandering districts of the most absurd kind.

Gerrymandering bases itself off the place of the districts in an attempt to sway voting in favor of one party or another or even for the most equal by dealing with similar human characteristics.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 30, 3:15 PM

unit 4

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Population 2

Population 2 | Geography in news | Scoop.it
Radical Cartography, brought to you by Bill Rankin

Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
Whitney Souery's insight:

We can see that the majority of the world's population is clustered in the mid latitudes in particularly Asia. Showing population in terms of latitude shows how people live based on environmental factors while longitude remains the same throughout, thus showing countries/continents and their rates of population simply based off of that country's growth rate or demographic momentum aside from just looking at climatic preference. For instance, Asia is the most populated area and this is evident because of the current growth rates. 

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dilaycock's curator insight, January 9, 6:03 AM

Interesting stimulus for discussion of why do we live where we live.

Geoff Findley's curator insight, January 9, 9:37 PM

Cool Cartogram...

 

Keisha Lewis's curator insight, January 12, 8:15 AM

Majorly cool! So many discussions about population distribution can come out of this. :)

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Cities and Urban Land Use 1

Cities and Urban Land Use 1 | Geography in news | Scoop.it

"For the first time in human history, more of the world’s 6.8 billion people live in cities than in rural areas. That is an incredible demographic and geographic shift since 1950 when only 30 percent of the world’s 2.5 billion inhabitants lived in urban environments.

 

The world’s largest cities, particularly in developing countries, are growing at phenomenal rates. As a growing landless class is attracted by urban opportunities, meager as they might be, these cities’ populations are ballooning to incredible numbers.

 

A May 2010 Christian Science Monitor article on “megacities” predicted that by 2050, almost 70 percent of the world’s estimated 10 billion people—more than the number of people living today—will reside in urban areas. The social, economic and environmental problems associated with a predominantly urbanized population are considerably different from those of the mostly rural world population of the past."


Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
Whitney Souery's insight:

The majority of megacities are in the developing world, with the exception of places like New York and Tokyo, best showing how the face of the world is changing. Developing countries are on their paths to becoming major powers, such as Calkutta for example. As an enlarging city, more and more citizens are flocking to the abundance of jobs in the city which thus increases India's development as a result of the growing city and thus leads to a cycle of growth as demand for more jobs increases as the city grows. Megacities are thus a symbol of the developing world and can be used in human geography as symbols of development. 

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Tracey M Benson's curator insight, February 24, 3:27 PM

"The world’s largest cities, particularly in developing countries, are growing at phenomenal rates. As a growing landless class is attracted by urban opportunities, meager as they might be, these cities’ populations are ballooning to incredible numbers."

Arya Okten's curator insight, March 27, 10:23 PM

Unit VII

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 28, 10:40 AM

unit 7

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Geography: its nature and perspectives 2

Geography: its nature and perspectives 2 | Geography in news | Scoop.it
Drawing on data from the 2010 U.S. Census, the map shows one dot per person, color-coded by race. That's 308,745,538 dots in all.

 

White: blue dots; African American: green dots; Asian: red; Latino: orange; all others: brown

Last year, a pair of researchers from Duke University published a report with a bold title: “The End of the Segregated Century.” U.S. cities, the authors concluded, were less segregated in 2012 than they had been at any point since 1910. But less segregated does not necessarily mean integrated–something this incredible map makes clear in vivd color.

The map, created by Dustin Cable at University of Virginia’s Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, is stunningly comprehensive. Drawing on data from the 2010 U.S. Census, it shows one dot per person, color-coded by race. That’s 308,745,538 dots in all–around 7 GB of visual data. It isn’t the first map to show the country’s ethnic distribution, nor is it the first to show every single citizen, but it is the first to do both, making it the most comprehensive map of race in America ever created.


Via Seth Dixon
Whitney Souery's insight:

We can use maps to think spatially,make connections, and find patterns. Maps can also be used as a way to compare change over time, as in this particular case where maps from the present were compared with maps from over fifty years ago when racial segregation was plainly obvious. Now, however, when we compare past maps with those of the present, the change over time factor becomes clearly evident, revealing why maps are so useful in determining continuities or changes.

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Cities and urban land use 5

Cities and urban land use 5 | Geography in news | Scoop.it
Many cities and urban areas are built on drained wetlands. The tidal basin of Washington, D.C., above, is still regularly flooded with tides rushing up the Potomac River from the Atlantic Ocean. Evidence of these gentle floods pool at the feet of this morning jogger.
Whitney Souery's insight:

Connecting physical geography with human geography, it becomes evident that many cities were built on former wetlands. This is usually because of access to water. Water holds the same role that like instruments, such as the railroad, also once held. Cities thrived because of their location, or proximity, to water which thus led to trade and increased migration into the city. St. Petersburg and Washington, D.C. are both examples of this. Cities grow because of their economic value, and water/rivers allowed for this to happen, thus explaining why cities are located where they are today. 

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Industrialization and Economic Development 5

Industrialization and Economic Development  5 | Geography in news | Scoop.it
Russian President Vladimir Putin signs a deal with his counterparts from Kazakhstan and Belarus to create an economic union.
Whitney Souery's insight:

Trade deals are one way to improve economic development. As a result of the stagnating economic situation in much of the former Soviet bloc, trade deals are becoming more and more attractive for the political figures who are beginning to pursue a deal with Russia. This deal is hoped to improve trading and economic relations, thus improving the economies of both Kazakhstan, Russia, and Belarus (the countries involved) and to improve development. 

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cities and urban land use 3

cities and urban land use 3 | Geography in news | Scoop.it
An urban area is the region surrounding a city
Whitney Souery's insight:

This collection of pictures shows different urban areas across the world and their interaction with the environment. The pictures are also taken from a different perspective each time, with some from an aerial view, or street view, which changes the way that the city is seen. For example, in the aerial picture of Carthage, we can see how the city depends on its location by the ocean for trading purposes, which contributes to the growth of the city.  

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Cities and Urban land use 2

Cities and Urban land use 2 | Geography in news | Scoop.it
A confrontation between 1,500 police and residents of a village on Mexico City’s western outskirts left more than 100 police injured in a battle over a water spring. Three police remained in intensive care Thursday, the city government said, and five people were under arrest.
Whitney Souery's insight:

Because Mexico City is such a large city, resources are becoming scarcer and more valuable. In particular, water has become a valued commodity that is now even scarcer and has led to several conflicts between 1,500 police and residents outside of Mexico City. Because Mexico City has a population of 9 million people, there is lots of pressure on the environment to extract resources, such as water.  

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the Nature and perspective of Geography 4

the Nature and perspective of Geography 4 | Geography in news | Scoop.it
The pictures were taken by people around the world on Earth Day.

Via Seth Dixon
Whitney Souery's insight:

For an introductory geography class, thinking spatially is an important concept for students to understand. While this global selfie has a flair of being on the fun side, it is still important in considering scale and the ability of geographers to consider not only what is happening on the larger scale, but on the small scale too. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 26, 9:40 AM

I must admit, I was not interested in the #globalselfie hashtag that NASA was promoting on Earth Day, but I don't think I understood the scope of what they were trying to do with it.  Because of my initial skepticism, I must now admit that this is pretty awesome. 

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Political Geography 5

Political Geography 5 | Geography in news | Scoop.it
The "sentencing rally," which occurred in a sports stadium before a crowd of 7,000, is reminiscent of the open-air trials of the Cultural Revolution in the 1960s and '70s.
Whitney Souery's insight:

It is fascinating to see how, even with time, some intrinsic policies remain the same. The recent public trials in China reflect back on  China's policies in the 1960s and 70s during the cultural revolution. While China's leadership was changed, the policies have not. Public trials, something that would be condemned and shunned in the US, are still the norm in China, a product of different political ideas. 

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Agriculture and rural land use

Agriculture and rural land use | Geography in news | Scoop.it
Finding willing young successors has been a major challenge for Japan's agriculture. But in the world of manga at least, farming is being embraced by the country’s youth.
Whitney Souery's insight:

In Japan, fewer young people are choosing to become farmers. As a way to increase the number of farmers and improve agricultural yield, Japan has taken to glorify farming in comic books as a way to gain more young farmers. On top of a declining population, finding new farmers to continue the agriculture industry is becoming harder and harder. This article represents a merger between population and agriculture. 

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Industrialization and Economic Development 4

Industrialization and Economic Development  4 | Geography in news | Scoop.it
There have been more protests over the abductions of the school girls in Nigeria, as people continue to call on the government to do more to rescue them.
Whitney Souery's insight:

In Nigeria, people are making demonstrations against their governments to show their desire for the girls to be released and their dissatisfaction with the government's actions. Nigeria, a country classified as a developing country, is showing its support for education. As a country that is industrializing, education plays an important role and the people best show this by their protests and their desire for the girls to be returned to school as a way to access equal education and improve their country's economic situation. 

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Population 3

Population 3 | Geography in news | Scoop.it
Report details deaths of 964 workers from Nepal, India and Bangladesh from cardiac arrests, falls and suicide

Via Seth Dixon
Whitney Souery's insight:

Migrant workers often represent the minority group in a particular country, such as Qatar (in this example). As such, migrant workers often have little rights or worker securities that most often accompany other workers and protect their rights; however, with the current immigrant explosion in Qatar as a result of the booming oil industry, it is easy for these migrant workers to be exploited and unaccounted for. 

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Sharrock's curator insight, May 15, 2:38 PM

#Geography #Qatar #migrant #OSHA

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, May 17, 7:05 AM

Qatar's high migrant population is a result of its oil reserves and need for labor. 

 

Population pyramid unique to a nation with large migrant worker population http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Qatar_population_pyramid_%282005%29.jpg

Jordan Schemmel's curator insight, May 21, 1:03 PM

Do migrant workers have the same rights as native workers? This continuing set of issues from Qatar brings that question to the forefront as they prepare to host the 2022 World Cup.

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Industrialization and Economic Development 3

Industrialization and Economic Development 3 | Geography in news | Scoop.it
When resource scarcity is a blessing, not a curse
Whitney Souery's insight:

Bill Gates was one of the first to suggest that we should not group countries into developed and developing countries because grouping a country like Mexico and Thailand together ignores blatant differences between the countries. Therefore, he argues people should be taught to think it terms of fat and lean countries with the fat countries being countries like the United States and countries in Europe and lean countries like the countries in Africa. 

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Political Organization of Space 3

Political Organization of Space 3 | Geography in news | Scoop.it
We chart the routes of, and reasons for, the barriers which are once again dividing populations

Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
Whitney Souery's insight:

Walls are a symbol of political boundaries and motives, usually intended to keep certain people in or out. This website in particular clearly highlights this idea in human geography as it explores the various walls that mark our landscape and thus contribute to changing policies and borders. Walls can also affect the landscape, not just mark it, as an effect of asserting either political dominance or border policies, as best seen by the resulting environmental results that come from it and the displacement of people (as seen on Palestinian-Israeli border). 

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Caterin Victor's curator insight, January 9, 4:00 AM

 Unfortunately,  for our    security, we  must  live  in a Walled World

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 14, 9:48 PM

It appears India is constructing a 2,500-mile long fence around its neighboring country Bangladesh. The barbed wire fence may have been built due to that fact India has one of the largest populations in the world and they do not want the struggling people of Bangladesh to enter their country. Also, areas around the fence are becoming dangerous, with more than 1,000 people killed by border patrol and criminals. There are not many jobs in Bangladesh and the people are having trouble finding clean drinkable water. Lastly, the people may be fleeing into India hoping to find work and an improved lifestyle.  

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 1:06 AM

We looked at this map in class its really interesting nd weird to see all the dividing walls in the world and to discover ones youve never seen before.

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Agricultural and Rural Land Use 3

Agricultural and Rural Land Use 3 | Geography in news | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
Whitney Souery's insight:

This map is the epitome of agricultural geography and the beginning of a series of questions such as why did all of Europe choose to be GMO-free? Or, does the proximity of European countries have to do with the fact that they share similar values (such as being GMO-free)? What does the EU have to do with this pattern? Because the EU chooses to be GMO-free, European countries are making a statement and consequently refining agricultural markets by refusing to import certain genetically modified foods. Agricultural geography thus shares some patterns across space- with all of Europe sharing simile agricultural policies. 

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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, February 5, 2:46 PM

Part of Europe know to be GMO free. Will we catch up? What will it take? A revolution?

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, February 5, 2:47 PM

Parts of Europe know to be GMO free. When will we?

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, February 27, 11:25 AM

The GMO debate is raging throughout the world. Many believe that these crops have many harmful effects on the human body due their their altered genetic state. Thankfully, many countries are adopting a non-GMO attitude, as illustrated in the above map, so as to prevent the many poor side-effects they have.