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What the Internet Looks Like

What the Internet Looks Like | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it
You are looking at, more or less, a portrait of the internet over an average 24 hours in 2012—higher usage in yellows and reds; lower in greens and blues—created by an anonymous researcher for the "Internet Census 2012" project.

Via Seth Dixon
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Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 5:02 PM
Whoa. This is awesome. Never before had I seen internet usage across the globe before. I wasn’t too surprised by the map its showing. Obviously the United States and Europe would have the highest internet traffic of the world although I was quite surprised to see such massive internet activity in Central America, near Panama and Costa Rica. This data was collected illegally and it was interesting how they did it. It was a bot who hacked into Linux computers with no password (really…) or a default password (still really…) and then tracked their IPv4 address to see their activity. It was a non-threatening bot and they created a readme file on each computer that explained what it was doing however it was still an invasion of privacy and no matter how cool the map came out I cannot agree with their methods of obtaining this information. What interested me at first about this was activity in the Middle East. You can see a lot of activity in Turkey and around the Nile in Egypt, but other than that the rest of the region is fairly dim. It is unfortunate that is so because of how it could help people there, just look at the Arab Spring.
Kevin Cournoyer's comment, May 1, 2013 12:51 AM
I found this collection of data very interesting. It reveals a number of different things about the internet across the world and the intensity of its usage.
Most obviously, perhaps, you can see what areas of the world have the most internet usage, or at least access. The areas of highest use seem to certainly match up with what you would expect: high internet usage and access in first world countries in Europe and in the United States, lower internet usage and access in more impoverished areas such as Africa and the Middle East. The amount of internet usage can also be seen increasing and decreasing as the animation moves from right to left, indicating the twenty four hour cycle of a day and presumably decreased internet usage during the night and increased usage during the day. This animation provides fascinating and valuable information about the internet in a unique geographic context. Economic geography is apparent in the concentration of internet usage, while physical geography is evident in the correlation between what parts of the world are accessing the internet at higher rates and when, in contrast to other parts of the world.
Thomas D's comment, May 2, 2013 11:32 AM
I find that this article of Internet usage is very interesting and somewhat helpful in understanding the development of countries. You can see from this that over a 24 hour period of time that the entire United States is lit up with a color. When over this 24 hour period there are places on the map that never once do you see a light or you only can see it for a small period of time. I think this goes to show how greatly our society depends on the Internet nowadays. That we basically use the internet or a computer for just about everything at all times of the day. That in some countries they are so underdeveloped that they barely have access to computers. According to this picture Africa is barely lit up and it’s mostly lit up in South Africa which is one of the growing countries in the world. I think this information although gathered illegally is very interesting to look at and see who uses the internet the most.
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Worldwide, Many See Belief in God as Essential to Morality

Worldwide, Many See Belief in God as Essential to Morality | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it
Survey Report Updated May 27, 2014 The original version of this report included public opinion data on the connection between religion and morality in China
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Tonga volcanic eruption creates new island

Tonga volcanic eruption creates new island | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it
Volcanologists say a newly awakened undersea volcano has created a substantial new island in Tonga.
Mel Kendall's insight:

plate tectonics. Creation of land due to seismic activity.

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Haiti Photos Then and Now: 5 Years After Earthquake, Much Rebuilding Remains

Haiti Photos Then and Now: 5 Years After Earthquake, Much Rebuilding Remains | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it
Photojournalist Allison Shelley documented Haiti for a year after the 2010 quake. She went back this month to check on rebuilding progress.
Mel Kendall's insight:

plate tectonics resource.

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Europe’s Empty Churches Go on Sale

Europe’s Empty Churches Go on Sale | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it
Hundreds of churches around Europe have closed or are threatened by plunging membership, posing a question for communities: What to do with the once-holy, now-empty buildings?

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Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 18, 5:30 PM

You would never think that these sacred buildings would come to this reality, but the truth is that religion is on the decline in Europe and churches cost money to be well kept.  Europe was so overpopulated in the past that they had to build lots of churches, many of which are architectural marvels.  If I had one of these sacred churches at my disposal, I suppose I would turn it into a really high end restaurant or some kind of fantastic indoor sporting facility.

Chris Plummer's curator insight, February 24, 8:01 AM

Summary- Hundreds of churches around Europe  are being closed and sold to other people. This is due to the lack of membership coming from the people that used to go there. People are turning these churches into various things such as skateparks. I think this is a very disrespectful act, turning a place of worship into a place to destroy. 

 

Insight- In Unit 3 religion is a big part. From this article, we can ask ourselves why the memberships of churches are declining. Do be just not care anymore? Are people moving away? Although the answer is no stated in this article, I think people there are just not as devoted to church as they used to be.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, February 26, 8:09 PM

Europe’s Empty churches going on sale is not upsetting to me, unless they are being used as skateboard parks. The main reason to the church’s closings are a rise in secular beliefs. With less people attending and making tributes to the churches they are given no choice but to shut down. These are buildings of great archaic integrity and I think that they should be sold to museums or to state governments as holy sites or something to that effect. These buildings should be preserved because they are a giant standing living history of this world. But as of now skate ramps and parks occupy these churches and may be damaging them. 

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Mapping World Religions


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Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 7, 8:18 AM

Summary - This video shows the birth places of religions and their diffusion over time. It shows the diffusion of the major wold religions by expanding their color, and using a timeline giving a great representation by their spread over time. No religions began in America or any other countries in the western part of the world. They all began in the east. Throughout diffusion, you can see christianity is the major religion that crossed over the seas spreading widely in the west.

 

Insight - In unit 3, one of the major concepts is religion and its diffusion. This map shows just that. By showing the different  world religions and their diffusion over time it is easy to tell where and when these religions became popular.

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 26, 9:22 PM

I just finished scooping the belief in God morality chart and it's kind of confusing to know that Christianity started in Europe because 70% of Europe does not believe that the belief in God is moral. I guess it's more of a technicality regarding the difference between Christianity and spirituality. Even though Hinduism started before other major religions, it appears to not have as much impact throughout the world like Christianity and Islam does. It's interesting to know that at the same time Islam was overpowering Christianity and overpowering most of the world, Christianity started going overseas to the United States.

Brett Laskowitz's curator insight, January 28, 12:01 PM

Plan to use this as an introductory piece for the Religion unit.  Have students watch the video and make a series of observations.  Then, divide the class into groups, with each focusing on one religion.  Have them make observations related to their religion.  Have students share their insights using "speed dating" discussions. 

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See How Humans Have Reshaped the Globe With This Interactive Atlas

See How Humans Have Reshaped the Globe With This Interactive Atlas | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it

"

Earth is changing rapidly, and an increasing number of scientists say that humans have become the dominant force driving these changes. While the term has no formal definition, many agree that we are now living in an age shaped by human activity: the Anthropocene.

Evidence for the Anthropocene ranges from worldwide population booms to the expansive transformation of the landscape. But solutions are cropping up at the local level that could help create a more resilient global community." 

 

Tags: ESRI, anthropocene, environment depend, sustainability. 


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Olga Boldina's curator insight, December 3, 2014 3:25 AM

добавить ваше понимание ...

Truthbehere2's curator insight, December 5, 2014 10:01 AM

Well duh...we are very greedy leeches that don't want to take the time to restore and repair what we take and destroy...

Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, December 8, 2014 10:58 AM

Excellent use of an Esri Storymap to outline how humans have changed Earth over time.

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In Full: Noel Pearson remembers Gough Whitlam - YouTube

Listen to Cape York Indigenous leader Noel Pearson's tribute to former Australian Prime Minister Gough Whitlam. Read more here: http://ab.co/1usULKF
Mel Kendall's insight:

Indigenous rights & freedoms. Yr 10 AusVELS.

Political Speeches

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Black Diggers - Arts - Browse - Big Ideas - ABC TV

Black Diggers - Arts - Browse - Big Ideas - ABC TV | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it
Black Diggers is the story of the aboriginal men who served overseas in World War One.
Mel Kendall's insight:

Indigenous rights & freedoms. Yr 10 AusVELS

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13 Misconceptions About Global Warming - YouTube

Common misconceptions about climate change. Check out Audible: http://bit.ly/AudibleVe References below: For CO2, sea levels, Arctic sea ice, Antarctic and G...
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Integrating Geography and History

Integrating Geography and History | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it

"This 18-stanza poem by Kit Salter, beautifully captures the importance of geographic thinking in any history/social studies curriculum.  This was shared by Dr. Vernon Domingo and the slides of his keynote address titled, Integrating Geography and History are available here."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 9, 2014 2:36 PM

It was my privilege to hear my good friend and fellow geo-evangelist, Dr. Vernon Domingo recently as he shared ideas on the importance of integrating geographic analysis in historical inquiry.  He shared a fabulous poem by Kit Salter, one of the pioneers in the Network of Geographic Alliances.  I'll only share the first stanza here:


    How can there be a separate scene,
    For history without place
    How can there be events in time,
    For which there is no space?


Tags: geo-inspiration, geography educationspatial, historical.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, October 9, 2014 2:51 PM

Kit Salter is the best in geography education. One of my mentors.

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NatGeo Feature: Megacities

NatGeo Feature: Megacities | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it

"By 2030, two out of three people will live in an urban world, with most of the explosive growth occurring in developing countries. For a preview of the future, the last in the Challenges for Humanity series explores São Paulo, Brazil; Lagos, Nigeria; Bangkok, Thailand; and Hyderabad, India."


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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 4:52 AM

Cities are attractive places to live. They host local entertainment, culture and are very lively.But with the increasing number of city dewellers in years to come i can see people easily forgetting their roots. This can also become a massive enviromental problems if citys start to expolde in numbers but the cities resources remain stagnet. Imagine a city like LA doubling in numbers the water supply in surrounding areas would be erraticacted.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:23 PM

Urbanization is the now. It is the up and coming world. That statistic is easily going to be correct in 2030. None the less, the world is conforming to its popular places. Where do you go when you need to shop, or to have a meeting? The city of course. Cities will take over the world and one day, no one will live in rural areas because there might not be any to even live in.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, December 8, 2014 1:07 PM

As Bangkok, Thailand is slotted to be one of the up an coming biggest cities in the world it puts Thailand on the map.  People see that the clothes they wear were made in Thailand and we think of a sweatshop in a far east country where children are laboring away for long hours making little money.  Although this was true in the past, we see now that it isn't like that.   These cities are where a lot of people are crammed together and live, yes, but also full of people who are looking forward to a better life.  These people have hope in the future of the city that they live in and are ready to invest in the future.  When comes the time that a majority of people will live in cities these cities such as Bangkok will already be developed and thriving, a major plus for the people already living and working here. 

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Woman Statistic Project - Maps

Woman Statistic Project - Maps | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it

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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, September 4, 2013 11:58 PM

CD - The reasons for and consequences of spatial variations in human wellbeing in Australia at the local scale.

 

One of the most interesting aspects of WomanStats interdisciplinary research is the creation of world maps that represent the various aspects of the situation of women worldwide. As noted in the research section of this website, we have developed several indices of women's status, which then may be mapped using GIS and other techniques of political geography.

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Simulation of the Oso Landslide

Simulation of the Oso Landslide | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it

"The large landslide that occurred in March near Oso, Washington was unusually mobile and destructive."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 13, 1:53 PM

There are several reasons for landslides--some are purely a result of physical geography and others are related to land use patterns.  The landslide in Washington state last year was a combination of the two (see on map) and it is a good teaching moment to discuss the environmental impacts of land use patterns and resource extraction projects.  As seen in this interactive, the river was cutting at the base of the hill, while loggers were clear-cutting at the top of the mountain.  Trees help prevent erosion as the roots hold the soil in place--a critical piece to the puzzle in a very rainy climate.  With $1 million worth of timber on the slope, logging companies persisted despite objections from the Department of Natural Resources and some restrictions (but in hindsight, those restrictions clearly were not enough).  Watch a simulation of the landslide here.  

View the impact in ArcGIS online: Before and After Swipe, LiDAR I and II, and Imagery.


Questions to Consider: Other than economic worth, what other ways are there to value and evaluate the environment?  How could this landscape have been protected and managed better or was this landslide inevitable?   


Tagspolitical ecology, resources, environment, environment modify, industry, physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 27, 4:50 PM

This seems like a useful tool to a degree.  But if we could actually simulate every destructive event then we would be miracle workers.  This was a sad event.  We have left such an imprint on the earth that it's starting to fight back.  We need to be more aware and careful with the one planet we have.  Climate changes are in the news more and more.  We can't ignore climate changes anymore.  

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Human activity has pushed Earth beyond four of nine 'planetary boundaries', scientists warn

Human activity has pushed Earth beyond four of nine 'planetary boundaries', scientists warn | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it
At the rate things are going, the Earth in the coming decades could cease to be a "safe operating space" for human beings.
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Town Slowly deformed by Plate Tectonics

Town Slowly deformed by Plate Tectonics | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it

"The signs that something’s wrong are not immediately obvious, but, once you see them, it’s hard to tune them out. Curbs at nearly the exact same spot on opposite sides of the street are popped out of alignment. Houses too young to show this kind of wear stand oddly warped, torqued out of sync with their own foundations, their once-strong frames off-kilter. This is Hollister, California, a town being broken in two slowly, relentlessly, and in real time by an effect known as 'fault creep.' A slow, surreal tide of deformation has appeared throughout the city."

 

Tags: disasters, geomorphology, California, physical.


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Town Slowly deformed by Plate Tectonics

Town Slowly deformed by Plate Tectonics | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it

"The signs that something’s wrong are not immediately obvious, but, once you see them, it’s hard to tune them out. Curbs at nearly the exact same spot on opposite sides of the street are popped out of alignment. Houses too young to show this kind of wear stand oddly warped, torqued out of sync with their own foundations, their once-strong frames off-kilter. This is Hollister, California, a town being broken in two slowly, relentlessly, and in real time by an effect known as 'fault creep.' A slow, surreal tide of deformation has appeared throughout the city."

 

Tags: disasters, geomorphology, California, physical.


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The speech that changed Australia

The speech that changed Australia | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it
It was the speech that helped change the face of Australia. Neil McMahon begins our Sunday Age summer series charting the waves of immigration that have enriched the nation.
Mel Kendall's insight:

AusVELS 10. History. Post war migration.

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Where in the World?

Where in the World? | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it

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Fathie Kundie's curator insight, January 8, 10:03 AM

اختبار في الجغرافيا.. عبارة عن صور مأخوذة من الجو .. حاول التعرف على الدول والمدن

Brian Wilk's comment, January 31, 9:34 PM
This is Australia I think.
Henk Trimp's comment, February 1, 6:37 PM
It sure is!
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The World Is Becoming A Better Place

The World Is Becoming A Better Place | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it

"People who love to complain about how horrible everything is also love to point out that the world is always changing — and change is of course always horrible, because it destroys the way things used to be. It's easy to get depressed by all the 'everything is horrible' talk.  So it's nice to sometimes remind ourselves that some things — many things, in fact — are getting better all the time."


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Beth Marinucci's curator insight, November 12, 2014 5:49 AM

Some good news . . .

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 19, 2014 5:10 PM

It is easy to talk about all the things that are wrong with the world today. It is a nice change in pace posting about something good going on in the world for once. Covering all regions of the world, this article is about how the world is becoming a better place. Thank god. Looking at the annual death because of battle, it is clear to see that the world is in fact, getting better. There are less deaths, which in turn also mean that there are less battles going on in the world. Poverty rate has also gone way down in the past couple of years. Even though there is still a huge amount of poverty, it has been getting better throughout the years. Another chart presented along with many other, was the life expectancy rate going through the roof. The best example is China, having their life expectancy at age 30 in the 1960's to age 75 now. There is still much room for improvement in the world such as disease, poverty, and climate changes, but this article makes me worry a little less about our world today.   

Aleena Reyes's curator insight, January 22, 6:50 PM

This is something I knew to be true but felt distant towards because outlets like American news sources are always focused on the bad. Why is that? It seems American to be fearful and instill fear.

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Say NO to Palm Oil

Say NO to Palm Oil | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it
In Australia, palm oil can be found in around 50% of packaged supermarket products, yet the moral & environmental implications of palm oil are devastating.
Palm oil is one of the primary causes f
Mel Kendall's insight:

rainforests. cross curricular links to sustainability and engage with Asia

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Eerie Landforms

Eerie Landforms | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it

Utah's Fantasy Canyon features mudstone eroded into bizarre shapes. This one's called "Flying Witch". #Halloween

 

Tags: physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms, Utah.


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Thomas Piketty's “Capital in the Twenty-first Century” explained

Thomas Piketty's “Capital in the Twenty-first Century” explained | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it
Is the global economy accelerating toward a future that’s incompatible with democracy?
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Flooding Risk From Climate Change, Country by Country

Flooding Risk From Climate Change, Country by Country | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it
A new analysis of sea levels and flood risk around the world offers more evidence that the brunt of climate change will not be borne equally.

 

More than a quarter of Vietnam’s residents live in areas likely to be subject to regular floods by the end of the century.  Globally, eight of the 10 large countries most at risk are in Asia.  These figures are the result of a new analysis of sea levels and flood risk around the world, conducted by Climate Central and based on more detailed sea-level data than has previously been available.  The analysis offers more evidence that the countries emitting the most carbon aren’t necessarily the ones that will bear the brunt of climate change.  

 

Tags: Southeast Asia, water, disasters, urban ecology, coastal, climate change. 


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Garry Rogers's curator insight, October 9, 2014 2:18 PM

The cost of these and other consequences of global warming will not be born by the few growing rich on the industries causing the problems. The cost will be born by the people working to produce the profit.

Eben Lenderking's curator insight, October 10, 2014 10:03 AM

Fascinating study on the flood impact of climate change

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 15, 2014 5:14 PM

In this article the author discusses the risk of flooding in many different locations of the world. He claims about 2.6 percent of the world's populations. That's a big percentage considering all the people of the planet. 

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Measuring wellbeing, Asia Education Foundation

Measuring wellbeing, Asia Education Foundation | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it
This module looks at how wellbeing is measured and the status of wellbeing in India and Bhutan. Students will gain insight into the complexity of determining wellbeing indices and the role they play when measuring economic development.

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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, August 1, 2013 4:01 AM

CD - The different ways of measuring and mapping human wellbeing and development, and how these can be applied to measure differences between places.