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Rescooped by Mel Kendall from Geography Education
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NatGeo Feature: Megacities

NatGeo Feature: Megacities | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it

"By 2030, two out of three people will live in an urban world, with most of the explosive growth occurring in developing countries. For a preview of the future, the last in the Challenges for Humanity series explores São Paulo, Brazil; Lagos, Nigeria; Bangkok, Thailand; and Hyderabad, India."


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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:12 AM

The mega city revlution has started and accroing to stastics its only to get more popular. The creattion of these mega cities has trasformed where people want to live, while also helping to bring nations stability though creation on these mega cities. It was said that with in 30 years more than 60% of the population will live in cities. Theses megacities are desirable, they help to stablize a country and have almost doubbled in number since the 1990's. It will be intereesting to see how the effects of megacites play out on the eniorment and ecnomny in the futre though.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 1:52 AM

Cities are attractive places to live. They host local entertainment, culture and are very lively.But with the increasing number of city dewellers in years to come i can see people easily forgetting their roots. This can also become a massive enviromental problems if citys start to expolde in numbers but the cities resources remain stagnet. Imagine a city like LA doubling in numbers the water supply in surrounding areas would be erraticacted.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:23 PM

Urbanization is the now. It is the up and coming world. That statistic is easily going to be correct in 2030. None the less, the world is conforming to its popular places. Where do you go when you need to shop, or to have a meeting? The city of course. Cities will take over the world and one day, no one will live in rural areas because there might not be any to even live in.

Rescooped by Mel Kendall from GTAV AC:G Y10 - Geographies of human wellbeing
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Woman Statistic Project - Maps

Woman Statistic Project - Maps | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it

Via Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)
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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, September 4, 2013 8:58 PM

CD - The reasons for and consequences of spatial variations in human wellbeing in Australia at the local scale.

 

One of the most interesting aspects of WomanStats interdisciplinary research is the creation of world maps that represent the various aspects of the situation of women worldwide. As noted in the research section of this website, we have developed several indices of women's status, which then may be mapped using GIS and other techniques of political geography.

Rescooped by Mel Kendall from GTAV Technology and cartography in Geography
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Making an Interactive Map

Making an Interactive Map | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it
When I discuss environmental geography in my Introduction to Geography course, I begin with a discussion of the history though on nature, civilization and culture.  I've shown pictures of the natur...

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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, September 22, 2013 3:39 PM

Lots of great information and links her if you are interested in learning how to make StoryMaps

Jim Lerman's curator insight, September 22, 2013 4:07 PM
Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s insight:

Lots of great information and links her if you are interested in learning how to make StoryMaps

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Extreme Weather and Drought Are Here to Stay

Extreme Weather and Drought Are Here to Stay | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it
It is increasingly clear that we already live in the era of human-induced climate change, with unprecedented weather and climate extremes.

 

I don't delight in sharing the bad news.  So is this drought just a freak anomaly or a sign of a new normal?


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Seth Dixon's comment, August 13, 2012 11:28 AM
The graphic was not connected to the article. It was linked on a PBS facebook page and I linked the juxtaposition of the graphic and the NY Times article. Here is the FB page: https://www.facebook.com/EarthTheOperatorsManual.Page Personally, an entire century as a baseline of comparison does not feel like cherrypicking data. True the Earth is an incredibly complex system that controlling for all variables is in essence impossible, but denying that the system has changed seems foolish to me. Why has the system changed? I'm okay with that being a reasonable debate worthy of academics.
Rescooped by Mel Kendall from GTAV AC:G Y10 - Geographies of human wellbeing
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Measuring wellbeing, Asia Education Foundation

Measuring wellbeing, Asia Education Foundation | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it
This module looks at how wellbeing is measured and the status of wellbeing in India and Bhutan. Students will gain insight into the complexity of determining wellbeing indices and the role they play when measuring economic development.

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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, August 1, 2013 1:01 AM

CD - The different ways of measuring and mapping human wellbeing and development, and how these can be applied to measure differences between places.

Rescooped by Mel Kendall from GEP Global Health and Human Development Resources for the Classroom
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Global Wellbeing Surveys Find Nations Worlds Apart

Gallup wellbeing data spanning 155 countries or areas shows vast differences in how people evaluate their lives. The percentage who are "thriving" ranges from 82% in Denmark to 1% in Togo.

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Rescooped by Mel Kendall from Geography Education
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What the Internet Looks Like

What the Internet Looks Like | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it
You are looking at, more or less, a portrait of the internet over an average 24 hours in 2012—higher usage in yellows and reds; lower in greens and blues—created by an anonymous researcher for the "Internet Census 2012" project.

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Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 2:02 PM
Whoa. This is awesome. Never before had I seen internet usage across the globe before. I wasn’t too surprised by the map its showing. Obviously the United States and Europe would have the highest internet traffic of the world although I was quite surprised to see such massive internet activity in Central America, near Panama and Costa Rica. This data was collected illegally and it was interesting how they did it. It was a bot who hacked into Linux computers with no password (really…) or a default password (still really…) and then tracked their IPv4 address to see their activity. It was a non-threatening bot and they created a readme file on each computer that explained what it was doing however it was still an invasion of privacy and no matter how cool the map came out I cannot agree with their methods of obtaining this information. What interested me at first about this was activity in the Middle East. You can see a lot of activity in Turkey and around the Nile in Egypt, but other than that the rest of the region is fairly dim. It is unfortunate that is so because of how it could help people there, just look at the Arab Spring.
Kevin Cournoyer's comment, April 30, 2013 9:51 PM
I found this collection of data very interesting. It reveals a number of different things about the internet across the world and the intensity of its usage.
Most obviously, perhaps, you can see what areas of the world have the most internet usage, or at least access. The areas of highest use seem to certainly match up with what you would expect: high internet usage and access in first world countries in Europe and in the United States, lower internet usage and access in more impoverished areas such as Africa and the Middle East. The amount of internet usage can also be seen increasing and decreasing as the animation moves from right to left, indicating the twenty four hour cycle of a day and presumably decreased internet usage during the night and increased usage during the day. This animation provides fascinating and valuable information about the internet in a unique geographic context. Economic geography is apparent in the concentration of internet usage, while physical geography is evident in the correlation between what parts of the world are accessing the internet at higher rates and when, in contrast to other parts of the world.
Thomas D's comment, May 2, 2013 8:32 AM
I find that this article of Internet usage is very interesting and somewhat helpful in understanding the development of countries. You can see from this that over a 24 hour period of time that the entire United States is lit up with a color. When over this 24 hour period there are places on the map that never once do you see a light or you only can see it for a small period of time. I think this goes to show how greatly our society depends on the Internet nowadays. That we basically use the internet or a computer for just about everything at all times of the day. That in some countries they are so underdeveloped that they barely have access to computers. According to this picture Africa is barely lit up and it’s mostly lit up in South Africa which is one of the growing countries in the world. I think this information although gathered illegally is very interesting to look at and see who uses the internet the most.