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Best GeoEd Scoops of 2015

Best GeoEd Scoops of 2015 | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it

"Every year I create a filtered tab with some of the best scoops here on Geography Education for that given calendar year.  If you disagree with the committee of one, I'd be glad to hear which one's were your favorites."


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The Science & Education team's comment, December 26, 2015 2:46 PM
Congratulations Seth, your Scoop.it feed is one of the joys of my day and has thrown up dozens of sites that I would never have been aware of. Thank you
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Kiribati and Climate Change

You might not be feeling the effects of climate change, but Kiribati, a small country in the Pacific, is actually drowning because of rising sea levels. Check out how the government there is trying to run a country that might not exist in a few years.

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Fred Issa's curator insight, December 2, 2015 3:39 PM

The people who do not agree that Climate change is real, need to look further than their own neighborhoods for proof that it is real. This really blew me away. Entire island populations that have to relocate to other islands, as their home island of Kiribati continues to sink lower and lower until you are walking in water when the high tide comes in? Imagine that the highest reference point on your island or chain of islands is your town's dump? What is positive about these people's plight is that they are being trained professionally in much needed fields, and second is that they are openly welcomed to other nearby islands. Fred Issa,

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:15 PM

this is an example of a small, innocent nation being hit harder by something caused by large nations which are having no negative impact on them. these large nations will not take responsibility until they must face the same results as Kiribati.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:07 PM

The video explains how the volcanic island will eventually disappear. The reason that the island will disappear is because of erosion and the sea is eating away at it. What makes them so easy to erode is the fact that the volcanoes are no longer active. Soon, coral reefs that are created will be the only thing holding the island together. Most of the island will be destroyed eventually and what is left behind will be in the shape of a caldera. 

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Simulation of the Oso Landslide

Simulation of the Oso Landslide | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it

"The large landslide that occurred in March near Oso, Washington was unusually mobile and destructive."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 13, 2015 1:53 PM

There are several reasons for landslides--some are purely a result of physical geography and others are related to land use patterns.  The landslide in Washington state last year was a combination of the two (see on map) and it is a good teaching moment to discuss the environmental impacts of land use patterns and resource extraction projects.  As seen in this interactive, the river was cutting at the base of the hill, while loggers were clear-cutting at the top of the mountain.  Trees help prevent erosion as the roots hold the soil in place--a critical piece to the puzzle in a very rainy climate.  With $1 million worth of timber on the slope, logging companies persisted despite objections from the Department of Natural Resources and some restrictions (but in hindsight, those restrictions clearly were not enough).  Watch a simulation of the landslide here.  

View the impact in ArcGIS online: Before and After Swipe, LiDAR I and II, and Imagery.


Questions to Consider: Other than economic worth, what other ways are there to value and evaluate the environment?  How could this landscape have been protected and managed better or was this landslide inevitable?   


Tagspolitical ecology, resources, environment, environment modify, industry, physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 27, 2015 4:50 PM

This seems like a useful tool to a degree.  But if we could actually simulate every destructive event then we would be miracle workers.  This was a sad event.  We have left such an imprint on the earth that it's starting to fight back.  We need to be more aware and careful with the one planet we have.  Climate changes are in the news more and more.  We can't ignore climate changes anymore.  

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Human activity has pushed Earth beyond four of nine 'planetary boundaries', scientists warn

Human activity has pushed Earth beyond four of nine 'planetary boundaries', scientists warn | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it
At the rate things are going, the Earth in the coming decades could cease to be a "safe operating space" for human beings.
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Town Slowly deformed by Plate Tectonics

Town Slowly deformed by Plate Tectonics | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it

"The signs that something’s wrong are not immediately obvious, but, once you see them, it’s hard to tune them out. Curbs at nearly the exact same spot on opposite sides of the street are popped out of alignment. Houses too young to show this kind of wear stand oddly warped, torqued out of sync with their own foundations, their once-strong frames off-kilter. This is Hollister, California, a town being broken in two slowly, relentlessly, and in real time by an effect known as 'fault creep.' A slow, surreal tide of deformation has appeared throughout the city."

 

Tags: disasters, geomorphology, California, physical.


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Town Slowly deformed by Plate Tectonics

Town Slowly deformed by Plate Tectonics | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it

"The signs that something’s wrong are not immediately obvious, but, once you see them, it’s hard to tune them out. Curbs at nearly the exact same spot on opposite sides of the street are popped out of alignment. Houses too young to show this kind of wear stand oddly warped, torqued out of sync with their own foundations, their once-strong frames off-kilter. This is Hollister, California, a town being broken in two slowly, relentlessly, and in real time by an effect known as 'fault creep.' A slow, surreal tide of deformation has appeared throughout the city."

 

Tags: disasters, geomorphology, California, physical.


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The speech that changed Australia

The speech that changed Australia | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it
It was the speech that helped change the face of Australia. Neil McMahon begins our Sunday Age summer series charting the waves of immigration that have enriched the nation.
Mel Kendall's insight:

AusVELS 10. History. Post war migration.

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Where in the World?

Where in the World? | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it

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Fathie Kundie's curator insight, January 8, 2015 10:03 AM

اختبار في الجغرافيا.. عبارة عن صور مأخوذة من الجو .. حاول التعرف على الدول والمدن

Brian Wilk's comment, January 31, 2015 9:34 PM
This is Australia I think.
Henk Trimp's comment, February 1, 2015 6:37 PM
It sure is!
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The World Is Becoming A Better Place

The World Is Becoming A Better Place | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it

"People who love to complain about how horrible everything is also love to point out that the world is always changing — and change is of course always horrible, because it destroys the way things used to be. It's easy to get depressed by all the 'everything is horrible' talk.  So it's nice to sometimes remind ourselves that some things — many things, in fact — are getting better all the time."


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Beth Marinucci's curator insight, November 12, 2014 5:49 AM

Some good news . . .

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 19, 2014 5:10 PM

It is easy to talk about all the things that are wrong with the world today. It is a nice change in pace posting about something good going on in the world for once. Covering all regions of the world, this article is about how the world is becoming a better place. Thank god. Looking at the annual death because of battle, it is clear to see that the world is in fact, getting better. There are less deaths, which in turn also mean that there are less battles going on in the world. Poverty rate has also gone way down in the past couple of years. Even though there is still a huge amount of poverty, it has been getting better throughout the years. Another chart presented along with many other, was the life expectancy rate going through the roof. The best example is China, having their life expectancy at age 30 in the 1960's to age 75 now. There is still much room for improvement in the world such as disease, poverty, and climate changes, but this article makes me worry a little less about our world today.   

Aleena Reyes's curator insight, January 22, 2015 6:50 PM

This is something I knew to be true but felt distant towards because outlets like American news sources are always focused on the bad. Why is that? It seems American to be fearful and instill fear.

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Say NO to Palm Oil

Say NO to Palm Oil | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it
In Australia, palm oil can be found in around 50% of packaged supermarket products, yet the moral & environmental implications of palm oil are devastating.
Palm oil is one of the primary causes f
Mel Kendall's insight:

rainforests. cross curricular links to sustainability and engage with Asia

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Eerie Landforms

Eerie Landforms | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it

Utah's Fantasy Canyon features mudstone eroded into bizarre shapes. This one's called "Flying Witch". #Halloween

 

Tags: physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms, Utah.


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Thomas Piketty's “Capital in the Twenty-first Century” explained

Thomas Piketty's “Capital in the Twenty-first Century” explained | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it
Is the global economy accelerating toward a future that’s incompatible with democracy?
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Flooding Risk From Climate Change, Country by Country

Flooding Risk From Climate Change, Country by Country | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it
A new analysis of sea levels and flood risk around the world offers more evidence that the brunt of climate change will not be borne equally.

 

More than a quarter of Vietnam’s residents live in areas likely to be subject to regular floods by the end of the century.  Globally, eight of the 10 large countries most at risk are in Asia.  These figures are the result of a new analysis of sea levels and flood risk around the world, conducted by Climate Central and based on more detailed sea-level data than has previously been available.  The analysis offers more evidence that the countries emitting the most carbon aren’t necessarily the ones that will bear the brunt of climate change.  

 

Tags: Southeast Asia, water, disasters, urban ecology, coastal, climate change. 


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Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 15, 2014 5:14 PM

In this article the author discusses the risk of flooding in many different locations of the world. He claims about 2.6 percent of the world's populations. That's a big percentage considering all the people of the planet. 

Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 14, 2015 12:10 PM

Flooding is a major risk when it comes to the world we live in especially for Southeast Asia, some areas will be below sea level which shows how the the climate changes are affecting the flood risks caused by global carbon emission. A study from this article shows that eight our of ten of the largest countries will be at the risk of being flooded and below sea level. The major question is how can this carbon emissions be lower? If the carbon is lower then the sea level will rise and less countries will be at risk, this is mainly focusing on Southeast Asia. Yes, we can not change the climate changes but by keeping the land clean and taking care of the environment the flood risk and sea level change could get out of risk level. 

If the weather continues at the rate it is at then about 2.6 percent of the global population which is approximately 177 million people will be living in a place at risk of regular flooding. Flooding can cause a lot of damage to homes, crops and people physically because flooding is not just a little amount of water.

The largest country at risk with people in danger from the map is China, I liked the way this map worked because you can see from the boxes how many people are going to be affected by the flooding. Instead of just having numbers, giving a better visual for people with the boxes and their sizes.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2015 9:24 PM

It's like watching the land on Earth change right in front of our eyes.  According to this map, if global carbon emissions stay as they currently are and sea levels can be affected about as much as expected, 2.6 million people of the global population will live in a high risk flood zone; this wipes out 177 million people!  

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GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world!

GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world! | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it
GeoGuessr is a geography game which takes you on a journey around the world and challenges your ability to recognize your surroundings.

Via Seth Dixon
Mel Kendall's insight:

I've shared GeoGuessr before but they now have country-specific quizzes (this is for the United States).  When I was a child I used to wonder if woke up somewhere far from home, would I be able to know where I was just by looking at the places around me (I was a geo-geek from way back when).  GeoGuessr is the closest thing to finding yourself lost in the world and needing to figure out where you are without being wisked away.  GeoGuessr will display 5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" and you have to guess where the images are located.  You can pan and zoom in the StreetView to explore the landscape and find more context clues as to where that location is.  It is a fantastic exploration exercise.   

 

Tags: landscape, place, trivia.

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Linda Denty's curator insight, August 9, 2015 7:33 PM

I've shared GeoGuessr before but they now have country-specific quizzes (this is for the United States).  When I was a child I used to wonder if woke up somewhere far from home, would I be able to know where I was just by looking at the places around me (I was a geo-geek from way back when).  GeoGuessr is the closest thing to finding yourself lost in the world and needing to figure out where you are without being wisked away.  GeoGuessr will display 5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" and you have to guess where the images are located.  You can pan and zoom in the StreetView to explore the landscape and find more context clues as to where that location is.  It is a fantastic exploration exercise.   

 

Tags: landscape, place, trivia.

Marianne Naughton's curator insight, August 9, 2015 7:59 PM

I've shared GeoGuessr before but they now have country-specific quizzes (this is for the United States).  When I was a child I used to wonder if woke up somewhere far from home, would I be able to know where I was just by looking at the places around me (I was a geo-geek from way back when).  GeoGuessr is the closest thing to finding yourself lost in the world and needing to figure out where you are without being wisked away.  GeoGuessr will display 5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" and you have to guess where the images are located.  You can pan and zoom in the StreetView to explore the landscape and find more context clues as to where that location is.  It is a fantastic exploration exercise.   


Tags: landscape, place, trivia.

Sanda Craina's curator insight, August 10, 2015 1:11 PM

I've shared GeoGuessr before but they now have country-specific quizzes (this is for the United States).  When I was a child I used to wonder if woke up somewhere far from home, would I be able to know where I was just by looking at the places around me (I was a geo-geek from way back when).  GeoGuessr is the closest thing to finding yourself lost in the world and needing to figure out where you are without being wisked away.  GeoGuessr will display 5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" and you have to guess where the images are located.  You can pan and zoom in the StreetView to explore the landscape and find more context clues as to where that location is.  It is a fantastic exploration exercise.   

 

Tags: landscape, place, trivia.

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Worldwide, Many See Belief in God as Essential to Morality

Worldwide, Many See Belief in God as Essential to Morality | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it
Survey Report Updated May 27, 2014 The original version of this report included public opinion data on the connection between religion and morality in China
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Tonga volcanic eruption creates new island

Tonga volcanic eruption creates new island | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it
Volcanologists say a newly awakened undersea volcano has created a substantial new island in Tonga.
Mel Kendall's insight:

plate tectonics. Creation of land due to seismic activity.

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Haiti Photos Then and Now: 5 Years After Earthquake, Much Rebuilding Remains

Haiti Photos Then and Now: 5 Years After Earthquake, Much Rebuilding Remains | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it
Photojournalist Allison Shelley documented Haiti for a year after the 2010 quake. She went back this month to check on rebuilding progress.
Mel Kendall's insight:

plate tectonics resource.

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Europe’s Empty Churches Go on Sale

Europe’s Empty Churches Go on Sale | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it
Hundreds of churches around Europe have closed or are threatened by plunging membership, posing a question for communities: What to do with the once-holy, now-empty buildings?

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Chris Plummer's curator insight, February 24, 2015 8:01 AM

Summary- Hundreds of churches around Europe  are being closed and sold to other people. This is due to the lack of membership coming from the people that used to go there. People are turning these churches into various things such as skateparks. I think this is a very disrespectful act, turning a place of worship into a place to destroy. 

 

Insight- In Unit 3 religion is a big part. From this article, we can ask ourselves why the memberships of churches are declining. Do be just not care anymore? Are people moving away? Although the answer is no stated in this article, I think people there are just not as devoted to church as they used to be.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, February 26, 2015 8:09 PM

Europe’s Empty churches going on sale is not upsetting to me, unless they are being used as skateboard parks. The main reason to the church’s closings are a rise in secular beliefs. With less people attending and making tributes to the churches they are given no choice but to shut down. These are buildings of great archaic integrity and I think that they should be sold to museums or to state governments as holy sites or something to that effect. These buildings should be preserved because they are a giant standing living history of this world. But as of now skate ramps and parks occupy these churches and may be damaging them. 

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, March 7, 2015 9:25 PM

Empty buildings now turned into just churches used for fun, or by the picture skateboarding. Europe is always known as the power house especially during their colonial period, when they colonized Africa and brought some of their religious beliefs towards the Africans. Europe is filled with big catholic traditions tracing back to the past, but now with this going on its a very sad state seeing something so significant in history in the European community go to waste..

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Mapping World Religions


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Elle Reagan's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:17 PM

This was a nice video of good length that allowed me to see how the world is broke up into different regions. I know that religion is a main factor of how places are divided and so I thought this video was a nice visualization of that. The map with the timeline was nice to have and I liked how it gave us an estimate of how many people are following each religion today. The video also helped me see how religion can be a main factor in defining world regions.

Jacqueline Garcia pd1's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:26 PM

In this video we are able to see the growth and fall of religions. It was quite fascinating to see the number of people in each religion and where in the world the spread. I thought it was helpful to see the dates of events that either caused spread or destruction of religions . For example the birth of Muhammad and the Crusades. THis shows the spatial distribution of religion. 

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:58 AM

This video puts world religions in a more basic form. Shows the patterns that religions take on a global scale, outlining the most prominent and least prominent throughout the world. 

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See How Humans Have Reshaped the Globe With This Interactive Atlas

See How Humans Have Reshaped the Globe With This Interactive Atlas | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it

"

Earth is changing rapidly, and an increasing number of scientists say that humans have become the dominant force driving these changes. While the term has no formal definition, many agree that we are now living in an age shaped by human activity: the Anthropocene.

Evidence for the Anthropocene ranges from worldwide population booms to the expansive transformation of the landscape. But solutions are cropping up at the local level that could help create a more resilient global community." 

 

Tags: ESRI, anthropocene, environment depend, sustainability. 


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Olga Boldina's curator insight, December 3, 2014 3:25 AM

добавить ваше понимание ...

Truthbehere2's curator insight, December 5, 2014 10:01 AM

Well duh...we are very greedy leeches that don't want to take the time to restore and repair what we take and destroy...

Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, December 8, 2014 10:58 AM

Excellent use of an Esri Storymap to outline how humans have changed Earth over time.

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In Full: Noel Pearson remembers Gough Whitlam - YouTube

Listen to Cape York Indigenous leader Noel Pearson's tribute to former Australian Prime Minister Gough Whitlam. Read more here: http://ab.co/1usULKF
Mel Kendall's insight:

Indigenous rights & freedoms. Yr 10 AusVELS.

Political Speeches

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Black Diggers - Arts - Browse - Big Ideas - ABC TV

Black Diggers - Arts - Browse - Big Ideas - ABC TV | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it
Black Diggers is the story of the aboriginal men who served overseas in World War One.
Mel Kendall's insight:

Indigenous rights & freedoms. Yr 10 AusVELS

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13 Misconceptions About Global Warming - YouTube

Common misconceptions about climate change. Check out Audible: http://bit.ly/AudibleVe References below: For CO2, sea levels, Arctic sea ice, Antarctic and G...
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Integrating Geography and History

Integrating Geography and History | Geography, History, SOSE | Scoop.it

"This 18-stanza poem by Kit Salter, beautifully captures the importance of geographic thinking in any history/social studies curriculum.  This was shared by Dr. Vernon Domingo and the slides of his keynote address titled, Integrating Geography and History are available here."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 9, 2014 2:36 PM

It was my privilege to hear my good friend and fellow geo-evangelist, Dr. Vernon Domingo recently as he shared ideas on the importance of integrating geographic analysis in historical inquiry.  He shared a fabulous poem by Kit Salter, one of the pioneers in the Network of Geographic Alliances.  I'll only share the first stanza here:


    How can there be a separate scene,
    For history without place
    How can there be events in time,
    For which there is no space?


Tags: geo-inspiration, geography educationspatial, historical.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, October 9, 2014 2:51 PM

Kit Salter is the best in geography education. One of my mentors.