Geography for All!
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Geography for All!
Geography that affects YOU!
Curated by Trisha Klancar
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Teen Attempting Record Trek to South Pole for Climate Change

Teen Attempting Record Trek to South Pole for Climate Change | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
Parker Liautaud, a 19-year-old arctic explorer, is attempting a record journey to the South Pole to raise awareness about global warming.
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Complexity in the Syria

Complexity in the Syria | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
A color-coded map of the country's religious and ethnic groups helps explain why the fighting is so bad.

Via Seth Dixon
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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 2014 6:19 PM

This map shows tha tthere are an overwhelimg amount of Arabs especially in centeral Syria. And then on the coast lline it is mostly mixed with pink representing the overwhlming other majority.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 2, 2014 8:11 PM

It appears from this article that Syria is a complicated country. The map shows the different ethnic and religious groups of Syria, along with other groups, all of which live within a small area. Syria, along with other countries within the Middle East have been faced with one serious issue or another. Many different people live within a very small area; those people practice different religions and are ethnically and culturally different. Unfortunately, being different in this part of the world may get you killed.   

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 2014 1:25 PM

Maps such as this one are very valuable when trying to understand conflict.  In Syria and the greater Levant area, unbalanced power and representation in politics is the result of many different religious and ethnic groups living in such close proximity each other, allowing conflict to become very invasive.

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Welcome to 'Geography Education'

Welcome to 'Geography Education' | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

Finding Materials: This site is designed for geography students and teachers to find interesting, current supplemental materials.  To search for place-specific posts, browse this interactive map.  To search for thematic posts, see http://geographyeducation.org/thematic/ (organized by the APHG curriculum).  Also you can search for a keyword by clicking on the filter tab above.


Via Seth Dixon
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Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 18, 2014 2:10 PM

Geography and current events

Olivier Tabary's curator insight, November 28, 2014 12:06 PM

Many interesting tools to practice and to discover

Jamie Mitchell's curator insight, March 8, 2016 1:04 AM

Amazing resources about places and topics in Geography

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Geography in the News: Keystone Pipeline and Canadian Tar Sands

Geography in the News: Keystone Pipeline and Canadian Tar Sands | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM and Maps.com KEYSTONE PIPELINE AND CANADIAN TAR SANDS CONTROVERSY Supporters and protesters continue to lobby both the White House and U.S.

Via Neal G. Lineback, Seth Dixon
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Paige Therien's curator insight, February 22, 2014 4:01 PM

This controversial pipeline project would allow the transportation of crude oil from Alberta, Canada's Athabasca Oil Sands to the United State's Gulf Cost.  This proves to be a difficult feat.  Extracting oil from this source is very difficult since it is also mixed with clay and sand, making it very dirty.  Transportation of this dirty substance through the pipeline would be equally as hard and risky since there is a risk that the oil could corrode the pipe.  This poses severe environmental and safety risks.  This pipeline passes through an international border and seven U.S. states which play huge roles in feeding the country.  A pipeline passing through this area could easily pollute the Mississippi River Basin, which is the main water source for the people and the crops located in the central area of the country.  There have also been cases where corroded pipelines have allowed widespread fires to occur, which is a possibility here.  Extracting oil from this source would allow North America to be self-reliant, however, there are many drawbacks to creating such a huge pipeline which originates in such dirty oil sources.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 15, 2014 12:57 PM

The three main arguments against Keystone XL is, one; making liquid fuel from tar sands keeps the United States dependent on a very polluting source of energy. Instead of moving towards cleaner sources of energy, the US would continue being one of the highest in CO2 in emissions. Secondly; the pipeline  has risks that include spills because the tar sands oil could corrode the pipe line and leak. And thirdly, the oil from keystone could be sold to foreign markets instead of staying domestic. Although the US needs to start being less dependent on foreign oil the Keystone pipeline is not the way to do so. Oil itself is not a permanent solution, it will run out and it continues to harm the environment. This pipeline defiantly poses more risks than anyone should be comfortable with.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, November 23, 2015 2:43 PM

The Keystone Pipeline is a pipeline bringing natural gas from Canada into the States. Many politicians are against the XL project to connect the pipeline from the Tar Sands in Alberta to the Gulf Coast. However, there has been much rebuff from the Democrats within the Congress and the White House.

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Scientists get insight on looming San Francisco Bay Area earthquake

Scientists get insight on looming San Francisco Bay Area earthquake | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
Every time the ground trembles in the San Francisco Bay Area, people ask themselves: Could this be the big one?
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Internet Safety Cheat sheet for teachers and parents

Free resource of educational web tools, 21st century skills, tips and tutorials on how teachers and students integrate technology into education

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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LETP's curator insight, July 21, 2013 11:31 PM

Good quotes shared by TED.com that we can all learn from as educators and parents. 

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Scientists call for protection of Canada's boreal forest

Scientists call for protection of Canada's boreal forest | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
An international group of 23 biology and conservation scientists is calling on the provincial governments and Ottawa to forever prevent the development of at least 50 per cent of the boreal forest that spans the Canadian north...
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Hurricane Sandy Was 1-In-700-Year Event

Hurricane Sandy Was 1-In-700-Year Event | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
From Elizabeth Howell, LiveScience Contributor: Hurricane Sandy's devastating storm track is a rare one among hurricanes; a new statistical analysis estimates that the track of the storm — which took an unusual left-hand turn in the Atlantic before...
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Seas may rise 2.3 metres per degree of global warming: report

Seas may rise 2.3 metres per degree of global warming: report | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
Sea levels rose by 17 cm last century and the rate has accelerated to more than 3 mm a year, says IPCC
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AP Human Geography: Cities

AP Human Geography: Cities | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
Resources for Teaching the AP Human Geography Cities and Urban Land Use Topic (RT @NatGeoEducation: Awesome collection of AP Human #Geography materials on urban areas: http://t.co/lTYcb9ljII #education)...
Trisha Klancar's insight:

Tons of material , thanks!

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Seeing America From This Perspective Makes Me Feel Like A Total Heel

Seeing America From This Perspective Makes Me Feel Like A Total Heel | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
Things that matter. Pass 'em on.
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Filmmakers Document the “Weirdness” of Marine Garbage on the Gyre Expedition

Filmmakers Document the “Weirdness” of Marine Garbage on the Gyre Expedition | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
On June 6 through 13, a team of scientists, artists, and filmmakers explored remote beaches of Alaska, to assess the impact of debris washing out of the great gyres, or currents, in the Pacific Ocean.
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World's Hurricane Tracks

World's Hurricane Tracks | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

"170 Years of the World’s Hurricane Tracks on One Dark and Stormy Map."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 28, 2013 10:00 AM

What physical forces create hurricanes?  What spatial patterns are evident? How does this map impact settlement patterns or hazard mitigation efforts? 


Tags: physical, disasters, environment.

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:18 PM

Hurricanes are most frequent in the late summer early fall season. This is because the air and water are mixing cold and hot temperatures and this is what forms the hurricanes to happen. This map does show that the most often hurricanes are near India and China etc. 

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Floods cover more than half of Philippine capital

Floods cover more than half of Philippine capital | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

"Flooding caused by some of the Philippines' heaviest rains on record submerged more than half the capital Tuesday, turning roads into rivers and trapping tens of thousands of people in homes and shelters. The government suspended all work except rescues and disaster response for a second day."


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Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 26, 2015 1:24 PM

For the second day in a row, the Philippines government has been forced to shut down all work, except for rescuers and disaster responders. Flooding has submerged more than half of the cities capital, Manila. Roads have turned to rivers and tens of thousands of people are trapped in homes and shelters. 7 deaths have been recorded so far. The capital holds 12 million people and more than 200 hundred evacuation centers have been opened. The monsoon that caused the floods is expected to travel north and cause havoc throughout the provinces surrounding Manila.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2015 11:03 PM

The area of Minila received more rainfall in day than it typically gets in a month.  Flights were delayed and cancelled, roads were turned into rivers.  Some of the thoughts of why this is happening are because of deforestation of mountains, clogged waterways and canals where large squatter communities live, and poor urban planning

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 28, 2015 6:44 AM

Flash flooding is probably the least understood natural disaster in the world. People often underestimate, how dangerous a flash flooding situation can become. The Philippines and South East Asia suffer from widespread monsoons. The regions fertile farmland is a result of the widespread heavy rainfall. A darker consequence of this phenomenon is the occurrence of dangerous flash flooding conditions. This particular rain in the Philippians was strong enough to submerge more than half of the capital underwater. The government in Manila has suspended all government operations that do not pertain to response and rescue missions. There will be major economic effects from this event. The loss of private property, and infrastructure such as roads will put a dent into the local economy.

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Recycling Awareness Campaign


Via Seth Dixon
Trisha Klancar's insight:

I love this...We are in Quebec City..this is in Montreal but it is the same. Very little recycling is done...people in homes do it then in the news we hear how it sits outside and rots, rusts or is wasted as the recylcing plant can not handle the amount it receives.This fact causes people to be upset and then to junk what they have.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 31, 2013 1:18 PM

I've posted on this topic now, so regular readers will know that I love a good flashmob that changes our perception of public places.  This flashmob from Quebec makes me wonder, "if there were a bottle on the ground, would I pick it up and recycle it?"  I'd like to think that I would, but the numbers show that most people would just walk right on by.  For more of my favorite flashmobs in public places, see http://geographyeducation.org/whats-new/articles/place-and-flash-mobs/  

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:50 PM

I have to confess that I probably wouldn't pick up a bottle in a public place because I would be worried with germs. I most definately would at work or somewhere I was fimilar with or had a sink available to wash my hands. I probably sound like a germ nut but you never know. I think when people are fimilar with an area or care about the appearance of a place they are more likely to pick it up. I did appreciate the cheers after the lady picked it up. 

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, September 21, 2015 1:02 PM

Excellent way to raise awareness to people who doesn't recycle or just ignore a plastic bottle in front of a recycling bin. It amazed me to see that it's such an simple task can be ignored, especially when the bin was right next to the bottle. It raised the question that are people just to lazy or is it human nature to mind our own affairs and walk away from things that doesn't pertain to us. In any case, it takes one person to make that difference and show everyone that it is THE normal thing to do and should become a habit rather than a chore. 

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Start-of-the-Year Videos

Start-of-the-Year Videos | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

"This is a compilation of videos that can be used to at the beginning of the school year to show the importance of geography, spatial thinking and geo-literacy."


Via Seth Dixon
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Jaiden VerSteeg's comment, August 29, 2013 11:41 PM
I watched video #1 and I thought it was very interesting. It was a great way to show what we are going to be learning about. I am really looking forward to learning about it.
Alexandria Goodyk's comment, August 29, 2013 11:59 PM
I watched video #3 and it's crazy how one video can give us so much information. I am so excited to learn new things this year and get educated with all of this stuff.
Richard Miles's curator insight, September 5, 2013 7:29 PM

Great little starters to get the students engaged with Geography!

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17 Facts About China That Raise an Eyebrow or two | Curious? Read

17 Facts About China That Raise an Eyebrow or two | Curious? Read | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
A entertainment website of interesting post about Technology, Science, Health, Funny, Odd and Strange.
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Pakistan's new big threat isn't terrorism -- it's water

Pakistan's new big threat isn't terrorism -- it's water | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
Shortages of the precious resource threaten to destabilize the region even further.
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7 Vintage Moon Mission Images for Apollo 11 Anniversary

7 Vintage Moon Mission Images for Apollo 11 Anniversary | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
Armstrong and Aldrin landed on the moon's surface 44 years ago, successfully completing humankind's first manned lunar landing in the
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What the Lac-Mégantic disaster means to the environmentB

What the Lac-Mégantic disaster means to the environmentB | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
The train derailment that devastated the small town of Lac-Megantic, Quebec may have far-reaching consequences for both the people and environment.
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