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Photos of Children From Around the World With Their Most Prized Possessions

Photos of Children From Around the World With Their Most Prized Possessions | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
Chiwa - Mchinji, Malawi Shot over a period of 18 months, Italian photographer Gabriele Galimberti's project Toy Stories compiles photos of children from around the world with their prized possesions—their toys.

Via Seth Dixon
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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 6:40 PM

This is horrifying and really puts things in perspective.  Their toys are not what they need.  None of these kids had anything creative except for the building blocks... I would have liked to have seen some paints and paintings, because I hugely believe that schools suck the creativity out of people's lives.  Toys can be... 'imaginative,' but not really.  Toys get put away when a kid turns 10.  Then they're in school.  Then they're at work... it was interesting to see the farmer girl with farm toys, but seriously, again, creativity should be encouraged at that age.  If people are not creative, they become creatures that absorb the habits and things that they are taught, with no ability to deal with new situations, or adapt their environment in a positive manner to better suit themselves or others.  I hate the stagnancy of the world today.  I used to play guitar in Providence on the streets, I have publically painted at URI, I have given paintings away to friends, and I love sharing ART, which can change the world, if only by one mind at a time.  I believe in the butterfly effect and that these kids should have something artsy as their most prized possession, because to not have that is to reflect the corporate importance in society on buying manufactured goods.  As for the kid with toy guns, it really isn't my business to speak ill of him, but seriously! He will end up with a TV show like Duck Dynasty one day or something... hope it works out for him.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 12:01 PM

This shows us how kids from different regions in the world value certain items that to others may seem almost trivial. Around the world everything is seen differently because situations are different.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 21, 4:28 AM

This is an alternative to using "Where children sleep" as an introductory activity. 

Geography for All!
Geography that affects YOU!
Curated by Trisha Klancar
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iPhone 5 Travels 20,096 Miles Before Ending Up in Your Hands [INFOGRAPHIC]

iPhone 5 Travels 20,096 Miles Before Ending Up in Your Hands [INFOGRAPHIC] | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

A fantasitic infographic  to show kids how things are made and what is required to get something made. Opens the door to discussion on the transportation issue of technology and outsourcing.

Then there is the discussion of jobs, equal pay, ... it is endless!

 

"From its inception to this final shipment, this infographic tracks the journey the iPhone 5 makes around the world to get produced."

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Welcome To Geography!

"Lets start off the new school year in style! This is a re-imagining of an older resource designed to introduce the subject to new students in a highly visual manner.  Feel free to use & share it."


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Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, August 24, 2014 11:59 PM

Introducción a la Geografía.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 3:29 PM

APHG-Intro

Sally Egan's curator insight, November 3, 2014 6:10 PM

This is a great introduction to the subject of Geography. Covering both the content, Fieldwork and investigation and teh tools and skills of the subject.

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Yes, Yellowstone's Roads Just Melted. No, There's No Reason to Panic

Yes, Yellowstone's Roads Just Melted. No, There's No Reason to Panic | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
"Last week, a major tourist thruway in Yellowstone National Park had to be shut down because the road melted. The road’s Wicked Witch of the West impression was caused by high temperatures in both the air and under the ground. Yellowstone sits atop a volcanic hotspot, and that heat helped cause the asphalt to soften and oil to well up onto the surface."
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Nicaragua unveils major canal route

Nicaragua unveils major canal route | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
"The Nicaraguan government and the company behind plans to build a canal linking the Atlantic and the Pacific Ocean have settled on a route."
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Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 11, 10:25 PM

Im sure that they believe that building this canal will take the country out of its financial disaster.  Even at the expense of not having clean drinking water, they must have thought about other alternatives to help the inhabitants of Nicaragua deal with the canals arrival.  With the country being poor already, this has to be worth the risk to help bring the country and its people out of poverty.  Hopefully this doesnt only make a few people rich and leave the rest of the country in shambles.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, March 5, 2:09 PM

This is a very ambitious project for Nicaragua.  I wonder what this will do to the economy of Panama City?  Someone will lower the fee to use their canal for the increase in traffic.  I wonder what will happen to both areas economically.  

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, April 5, 9:19 PM

Human activities change landforms and landscapes


Australian Curriculum

The human causes and effects of landscape degradation (ACHGK051)


GeoWorld 8

Chapter 5: Humans value, change and protect landscapes

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Learning Activity: Label Mapping

Learning Activity: Label Mapping | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
Here's a simple way to bring home world-class lessons in the
global economy. (A fun way to help teach your kids geography: http://t.co/d491HYy0Tx)
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Typhoon, Hurricane, Cyclone: What's the Difference?

Typhoon, Hurricane, Cyclone: What's the Difference? | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
Hurricanes, cyclones, and typhoons are all the same weather phenomenon.
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Let the exploitation begin: Ecuador issues drilling permits for untouched corner of the Amazon

Let the exploitation begin: Ecuador issues drilling permits for untouched corner of the Amazon | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
"The world has failed us," President Rafael Correa said of his abandoned conservation effort
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EnviroAtlas

EnviroAtlas | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

EnviroAtlas is a collection of interactive tools and resources that allows users to explore the many benefits people receive from nature, often referred to as ecosystem services. Key components of EnviroAtlas include the following:

A multi-scaled Interactive Map with broad scale data for the lower 48 states and fine scale data for selected communitiesThe Eco-Health Relationship Browser, which shows the linkages between ecosystems, the services they provide, and human healthEcosystem services information, GIS and analysis tools, and written resources
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steve smith's curator insight, May 23, 2014 3:59 PM

This looks great, will be having a play with this soon !

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, May 24, 2014 3:38 PM

Enviro Atlas. Mapa Interactivo.

Allan Tsuda's curator insight, May 25, 2014 9:21 PM

Unbelievable, tremendous resource. I wish I had this one growing up. It is a US gov site (EPA), and is for US geography. I'm betting you can search around for similar sites for other locales around the world. Great demo. Demo runs on Adobe Captivate. The demo took a little bit of time to load on a wired connection through a high speed fiber optic connection. Or skip the demo and play around with the maps. Site not all that fast. Still, it's worth waiting for if you want the data.

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This Is What Inequality Looks Like In Mexico

This Is What Inequality Looks Like In Mexico | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
Mexico has an inequality problem. The uneven distribution of wealth is perhaps best illustrated by a series of images captured by photographer Oscar Ruíz in Mexico City. Produced by ad firm Publicis, the campaign seeks to to highlight the huge...
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Graphic: This whale can dive deeper than any other mammal (including humans)

Graphic: This whale can dive deeper than any other mammal (including humans) | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
A Cuvier’s beaked whale dove down nearly 1.9 miles (2,992 meters) and spent two hours and 17 minutes underwater before resurfacing.
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Free Technology for Teachers: GE Teach Version 5 - A Good Resource for Teaching With Google Earth

Free Technology for Teachers: GE Teach Version 5 - A Good Resource for Teaching With Google Earth | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
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The disappearing Amazon rainforest

The disappearing Amazon rainforest | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
The Globe and Mail offers the most authoritative news in Canada, featuring national and international news
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Where China and Kazakhstan Meet

Where China and Kazakhstan Meet | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

"While people often say that borders aren’t visible from space, the line between Kazakhstan and China could not be more clear in this satellite image. Acquired by the Landsat 8 satellite on September 9, 2013, the image shows northwestern China around the city of Qoqek and far eastern Kazakhstan near Lake Balqash.

The border between the two countries is defined by land-use policies. In China, land use is intense. Only 11.62 percent of China’s land is arable. Pressed by a need to produce food for 1.3 billion people, China farms just about any land that can be sustained for agriculture. Fields are dark green in contrast to the surrounding arid landscape, a sign that the agriculture is irrigated. As of 2006, about 65 percent of China’s fresh water was used for agriculture, irrigating 629,000 square kilometers (243,000 square miles) of farmland, an area slightly smaller than the state of Texas.

The story is quite different in Kazakhstan. Here, large industrial-sized farms dominate, an artifact of Soviet-era agriculture. While agriculture is an important sector in the Kazakh economy, eastern Kazakhstan is a minor growing area. Only 0.03 percent of Kazakhstan’s land is devoted to permanent agriculture, with 20,660 square kilometers being irrigated. The land along the Chinese border is minimally used, though rectangular shapes show that farming does occur in the region. Much of the agriculture in this region is rain-fed, so the fields are tan much like the surrounding natural landscape."

 

Tags: remote sensing, land use, environment, geospatial, environment modify, food, agriculture, agricultural land change.


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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, March 1, 10:00 PM

This photograph illustrates how cultures and land use can be vastly different even in neighboring countries.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, April 15, 10:24 AM

It is amazing what irrigation can produce.  The border between China and Kazakhstan is a perfect picture of land with irrigation and one without supplied water.  Eastern Kasakhstan has farmland but it is only subsidized by natural rainfall whereas on the greener Chinese side of the border it is supplemented with water by the farmers.  Great picture!

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 12:00 PM

Seeing such a striking difference between two countries that are so close together is strange and thought-provoking. Knowing a little bit about the two countries can make a world of difference, though. In this case, we have China and Kazakhstan, two countries located in East/Central Asia. Kazakhstan borders China to the west, along the northern part of its western border. Much of China's inland land use is devoted to agriculture, as the majority of its industry is located near its coast. This is evident by the amount of green space seen in the satellite image above. With well over a billion people to feed, China needs to make use of as much of its arable land as possible. Kazakhstan, on the other hand is a much smaller country with much less land devoted to agriculture. Its farmland is mostly large and industrial, as a result of Soviet-era farming and is rain-fed rather than irrigated, like China's.

 

Knowing the history as well as the economic strengths of a country can therefore be useful in interpreting satellite images such as the one in this article. A lack of knowledge about China and Kazakhstan's economy and history may lead to an assumption that the Chinese are just better farmers than the Kazakhs. This is of course not necessarily true, but what is true is that China has a much larger and more immediate need for agriculture than does Kazakhstan and so devotes more of its land, time, and energy to farming. Likewise, it shouldn't be assumed that Kazakhstan has no need for agriculture at all. Instead, its history has largely influenced its economic strengths and needs, and the result is a country that looks very different from China. 

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What’s the Difference Between a Lake and a Pond?

What’s the Difference Between a Lake and a Pond? | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
“ You’re taking a summer stroll along a nice trail when you come across a body of water. “That’s a beautiful lake,” you think to yourself. Or ... wait. Is that a beautiful pond? What's the difference between the two, anyway?”
Via Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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Loss of ponds, wetlands exacerbated Manitoba flooding: report

Loss of ponds, wetlands exacerbated Manitoba flooding: report | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
Authors suggest that had the same amount of rain fallen in the 1950s, Assiniboine River would have only reached half its peak level
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Au départ, on l'a pris pour un fou. Maintenant, on le traite de génie. Découvrez Boyan Slat.

Au départ, on l'a pris pour un fou. Maintenant, on le traite de génie. Découvrez Boyan Slat. | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
Boyan Slat vient d'annoncer que son projet fou The Ocean Cleanup est viable. Découvrez comment un entonnoir géant peut nettoyer les océans du plastique.
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The Great Green Wall

The Great Green Wall | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
The Great Green Wall initiative uses an integrated approach to restore a diversity of ecosystems to the North African landscape.

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Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 11:56 AM

I like the idea of these countries who face the same issues joining together to combat and find a solution for there problems with climate change, desertion, gentrification. I like the idea of the African continent joining arms in order to address the same issues there neighboring countries face. While Africa is always portrayed as a land ridden with war and strife with one another, this great image of all these nations uniting is a positive move towards a bright future for the continent. 

Danielle Lip's curator insight, March 15, 2:37 PM

The Great Green Wall is not actually a wall nor is it green, this areas is very dry, having no negation or biodiversity. Yet eleven countries are banning together where this "wall" coexists and they place to help bring the native plants back to life. The eleven countries that this Great Wall is included in are the Sahel-Sahara region—Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Sudan, Chad, Niger, Nigeria, Mali, Burkina Faso, Mauritania, and Senegal. The focus area in these countries will become reproduced and the living conditions in these countries will grow and become full of life once again. I believe that it is very important to keep the environment alive and well because it makes for attractive living as well as a healthy life because oxygen comes from the plants and the air.

A point made in the article said that "We want to replicate and scale up these achievements across the region. It’s very possible to restore trees to a landscape and to restore agroforestrypractices without planting any trees." I liked this statement because it shows that the people in the countries are actually going to try and I find that very important. If you lived in one of the eleven countries would you want to live in a dried up area with no places or life?

Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 25, 3:53 PM

Poor climate and poor land management such as over farming, and overgrazing has led to a significant decline in arable land in the Sahel region. Under the Great Green Wall initiative scientists are working to restore land that used to be rich with diverse plant life. Eleven countries; Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Sudan, Chad, Niger, Nigeria, Mali, Burkina Faso, Mauritania, and Senegal have joined the Great Green Wall Initiative and are working to reduce land degradation and restore their native plant life. Hopefully this ties in with my last article on the food shortages of the Sahel.

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The Ship-Breakers

The Ship-Breakers | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
In Bangladesh men desperate for work perform one of the world’s most dangerous jobs.

Via Seth Dixon
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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 8, 9:00 PM

I like the part of this article that asks "In the West you don’t let people pollute your countries by breaking up ships on your beaches. Why is it OK for poor workers to risk their lives to dispose of your unwanted ships here?”  This statement is so true and of course is related to the money that is saved by outsourcing the job of breaking down the ships.  Not only does it save the West money, but it saves the land by not bringing the pollution upon us.  There has to be a way to do this job more environmentally friendly and making it safer for the workers.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, April 22, 10:46 AM

I always wondered what happened to ships after they were taken out of service, I've seen images of airplane grave yards out west, filled with 747's and other planes just rotting away. Though some of those planes are huge, ships are definitely larger and take up more space. 

 

The waste of the ships is incredible. The hull may be the visible part of the vessel but on the inside, the ship is filled with toxic waste from its days of transporting oil. Asbestos is also laden within the older ships since health laws were not as strict in pre-1980 world.

 

It is easy to see how Bangladesh became the ship deconstruction capital of the world. Toxic material disposal in the Western world is incredibly expensive since it is done correctly. Bangladesh has cheap labour and the laws in regards to the disposal of toxic waste are loose. Where a company in the West may haul in less of a profit because of the cost of disposal, Bangladeshi companies are able to take in a one million dollar return on a five million dollar investment. 

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 22, 6:53 PM

With the health risks and pollution that is ruining the soil aside, this seems like a great buiseness and way to make money for many people who are unqualified to do anything else.  Its almost like the people working in factories and in the steel mills during the beginning of the industrial revolution.  Many jobs were hazardous for your health and your surroundings, but it is a way to make a living.  I can see why it happens in this part of the world as apposed to others due to the low wages these people are working for, thus making this even more profitable to the people running the show.

 

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WATCH: Iceberg 6 times the size of Manhattan on the move in Antarctic

WATCH: Iceberg 6 times the size of Manhattan on the move in Antarctic | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
A large iceberg that broke off the Pine Island Glacier in early November is making its way to the Southern Ocean and scientists are keeping a close eye on it.
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5 Arguments That Will Convince You the Keystone XL Pipeline Is a Bad Idea

5 Arguments That Will Convince You the Keystone XL Pipeline Is a Bad Idea | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
The window is closing on your chance to tell Obama to oppose the controversial pipeline.
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NASA Sun-Earth Video Wins International Science Challenge

NASA Sun-Earth Video Wins International Science Challenge | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
"Dynamic Earth," a video created by staffers at NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio and their colleagues, took first prize in the 2013 International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge.
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