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Favela Images

Favela Images | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
I love these favela images by Fernando Alan.
Via Seth Dixon
Trisha Klancar's insight:

Amazing images to bring this to life for kids who have no concept what the favela looks like.

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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 29, 2:50 PM

The favelas show that the country has not been able to keep up with the growth of urban population,  increasing population, and poverty.  It also shows how the people of Brazil use their resources to survive and build housing. There are many socioeconomic issues at stake in these favelas and with these favelas comes an increase in drugs and violence.

James Hobson's curator insight, September 30, 8:57 AM

(South America topic 6)

These images seem almost unreal in the sense that these favelas appear to be like trees growing out of the hillside. I noticed that the homes towards the bottom of the hill appear much smaller than those at the top. If all were the same size the ones on the top would appear to be smallest from this angle. Even though this is considered a favela, it must be that some are willing to sacrifice space for convenience of location. Lastly, I would imagine that it must be easy to get lost on the way to one's home... the twisting paths and lack of any 'official' streets would be a maze to an outside visitor. I wonder if anybody has had the idea to start making a so-called road map of the paths through these favelas? That would be very interesting to see.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 24, 9:29 PM

These images of the Favelas in Brazil are absolutely amazing. Not only does it show the poor urban parts of the city are, but just how hard it is to live in these areas, as well as, the clustered so many houses are. The largest picture shown seems like a painting and not a picture, which makes the pictures more fascinating to look at.

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iPhone 5 Travels 20,096 Miles Before Ending Up in Your Hands [INFOGRAPHIC]

iPhone 5 Travels 20,096 Miles Before Ending Up in Your Hands [INFOGRAPHIC] | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

A fantasitic infographic  to show kids how things are made and what is required to get something made. Opens the door to discussion on the transportation issue of technology and outsourcing.

Then there is the discussion of jobs, equal pay, ... it is endless!

 

"From its inception to this final shipment, this infographic tracks the journey the iPhone 5 makes around the world to get produced."

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Welcome To Geography!

"Lets start off the new school year in style! This is a re-imagining of an older resource designed to introduce the subject to new students in a highly visual manner.  Feel free to use & share it."


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Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, August 24, 11:59 PM

Introducción a la Geografía.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 3:29 PM

APHG-Intro

Sally Egan's curator insight, November 3, 6:10 PM

This is a great introduction to the subject of Geography. Covering both the content, Fieldwork and investigation and teh tools and skills of the subject.

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Yes, Yellowstone's Roads Just Melted. No, There's No Reason to Panic

Yes, Yellowstone's Roads Just Melted. No, There's No Reason to Panic | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
"Last week, a major tourist thruway in Yellowstone National Park had to be shut down because the road melted. The road’s Wicked Witch of the West impression was caused by high temperatures in both the air and under the ground. Yellowstone sits atop a volcanic hotspot, and that heat helped cause the asphalt to soften and oil to well up onto the surface."
Via Seth Dixon
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Nicaragua unveils major canal route

Nicaragua unveils major canal route | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
"The Nicaraguan government and the company behind plans to build a canal linking the Atlantic and the Pacific Ocean have settled on a route."
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Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, September 24, 8:58 PM

This is an immense idea being proposed to the Nicaraguan people. Yes this would make them a large player in the world economic stage

,however are there more cons than pros in this plan? Currently the only direct route from the Pacific to the Caribbean Sea is the Panama Canal. A route that has largely under United States control. This route is profitable for both the U.S.(investor) and Panamanian (investee ) economies. The country of Nicaragua has been approached by investors to create their own passageway. Despite the fact that it may seem all positive the Nicaraguan people should consider all of the consequences. Lake Nicaragua is the countries main source of water. Having said this,do these citizens really want mega cargo ships wading through their drinking water? What type of wild life will be destroyed in the making of this passage way? Large amounts of natural resources may suffer, more than may have been effected with the creation of the canal to the south.All consequences should be considered before a decision is made. Money sadly should not be the only thing considered.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, September 29, 12:00 PM

I can only imagine the worry, and possible feuding, that this project is going to cause the people of Nicaragua. The project could offer jobs and will definitely bring much needed money into the country, which is struggling more than many of the countries in the region, but it is hard to weigh that against environmental destruction. Lake Nicaragua is seriously at risk. Between the introduction of possible invasive species to the pollution of drinking water and fishing grounds, I am worried that the money made by opening a canal will have to be used to save the drinking water. 

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, October 6, 3:14 PM

The Nacaraguan government plans to build a canal from Punta Gorda to Brito in hopes of moving Nicaraguans out of poverty and creating a more efficent trade route. This trade route will rival the Panama canel and illustrates China's and Nicaragua's hopes of improving their international trade.

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Learning Activity: Label Mapping

Learning Activity: Label Mapping | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
Here's a simple way to bring home world-class lessons in the
global economy. (A fun way to help teach your kids geography: http://t.co/d491HYy0Tx)
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Typhoon, Hurricane, Cyclone: What's the Difference?

Typhoon, Hurricane, Cyclone: What's the Difference? | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
Hurricanes, cyclones, and typhoons are all the same weather phenomenon.
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Let the exploitation begin: Ecuador issues drilling permits for untouched corner of the Amazon

Let the exploitation begin: Ecuador issues drilling permits for untouched corner of the Amazon | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
"The world has failed us," President Rafael Correa said of his abandoned conservation effort
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EnviroAtlas

EnviroAtlas | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

EnviroAtlas is a collection of interactive tools and resources that allows users to explore the many benefits people receive from nature, often referred to as ecosystem services. Key components of EnviroAtlas include the following:

A multi-scaled Interactive Map with broad scale data for the lower 48 states and fine scale data for selected communitiesThe Eco-Health Relationship Browser, which shows the linkages between ecosystems, the services they provide, and human healthEcosystem services information, GIS and analysis tools, and written resources
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steve smith's curator insight, May 23, 3:59 PM

This looks great, will be having a play with this soon !

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, May 24, 3:38 PM

Enviro Atlas. Mapa Interactivo.

Allan Tsuda's curator insight, May 25, 9:21 PM

Unbelievable, tremendous resource. I wish I had this one growing up. It is a US gov site (EPA), and is for US geography. I'm betting you can search around for similar sites for other locales around the world. Great demo. Demo runs on Adobe Captivate. The demo took a little bit of time to load on a wired connection through a high speed fiber optic connection. Or skip the demo and play around with the maps. Site not all that fast. Still, it's worth waiting for if you want the data.

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This Is What Inequality Looks Like In Mexico

This Is What Inequality Looks Like In Mexico | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
Mexico has an inequality problem. The uneven distribution of wealth is perhaps best illustrated by a series of images captured by photographer Oscar Ruíz in Mexico City. Produced by ad firm Publicis, the campaign seeks to to highlight the huge...
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Graphic: This whale can dive deeper than any other mammal (including humans)

Graphic: This whale can dive deeper than any other mammal (including humans) | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
A Cuvier’s beaked whale dove down nearly 1.9 miles (2,992 meters) and spent two hours and 17 minutes underwater before resurfacing.
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Free Technology for Teachers: GE Teach Version 5 - A Good Resource for Teaching With Google Earth

Free Technology for Teachers: GE Teach Version 5 - A Good Resource for Teaching With Google Earth | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
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The disappearing Amazon rainforest

The disappearing Amazon rainforest | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
The Globe and Mail offers the most authoritative news in Canada, featuring national and international news
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Where China and Kazakhstan Meet

Where China and Kazakhstan Meet | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

"While people often say that borders aren’t visible from space, the line between Kazakhstan and China could not be more clear in this satellite image. Acquired by the Landsat 8 satellite on September 9, 2013, the image shows northwestern China around the city of Qoqek and far eastern Kazakhstan near Lake Balqash.

The border between the two countries is defined by land-use policies. In China, land use is intense. Only 11.62 percent of China’s land is arable. Pressed by a need to produce food for 1.3 billion people, China farms just about any land that can be sustained for agriculture. Fields are dark green in contrast to the surrounding arid landscape, a sign that the agriculture is irrigated. As of 2006, about 65 percent of China’s fresh water was used for agriculture, irrigating 629,000 square kilometers (243,000 square miles) of farmland, an area slightly smaller than the state of Texas.

The story is quite different in Kazakhstan. Here, large industrial-sized farms dominate, an artifact of Soviet-era agriculture. While agriculture is an important sector in the Kazakh economy, eastern Kazakhstan is a minor growing area. Only 0.03 percent of Kazakhstan’s land is devoted to permanent agriculture, with 20,660 square kilometers being irrigated. The land along the Chinese border is minimally used, though rectangular shapes show that farming does occur in the region. Much of the agriculture in this region is rain-fed, so the fields are tan much like the surrounding natural landscape."

 

Tags: remote sensing, land use, environment, geospatial, environment modify, food, agriculture, agricultural land change.


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MsPerry's curator insight, September 6, 4:34 PM

APHG U4

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, September 18, 5:26 AM

what a difference a govt makes!

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 24, 2:38 PM

This photo shows what happens when a government is dedicated to developing agricultural industry. With a population so large it is critical that they capitalize on all their irritable land and there for that is why the border is so drastically different. In China they need the land to be used when it is possible.  

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What’s the Difference Between a Lake and a Pond?

What’s the Difference Between a Lake and a Pond? | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
“ You’re taking a summer stroll along a nice trail when you come across a body of water. “That’s a beautiful lake,” you think to yourself. Or ... wait. Is that a beautiful pond? What's the difference between the two, anyway?”
Via Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks
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Loss of ponds, wetlands exacerbated Manitoba flooding: report

Loss of ponds, wetlands exacerbated Manitoba flooding: report | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
Authors suggest that had the same amount of rain fallen in the 1950s, Assiniboine River would have only reached half its peak level
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Au départ, on l'a pris pour un fou. Maintenant, on le traite de génie. Découvrez Boyan Slat.

Au départ, on l'a pris pour un fou. Maintenant, on le traite de génie. Découvrez Boyan Slat. | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
Boyan Slat vient d'annoncer que son projet fou The Ocean Cleanup est viable. Découvrez comment un entonnoir géant peut nettoyer les océans du plastique.
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The Great Green Wall

The Great Green Wall | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
The Great Green Wall initiative uses an integrated approach to restore a diversity of ecosystems to the North African landscape.

Via Seth Dixon
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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 11:38 PM

Its great to see countries coming together for one purpose and in this case the "Green Wall" to help protect and restore ecosystems in North Africa.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:32 PM

The Green Wall hopes to restore the environment of the North African area that was destroyed by desertification from overgrazing.

Desertification is one of the many consequences of Human-Environment Interaction that comes mainly from agricultural activity.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 31, 12:03 AM

I'm glad that something is being done before its too late.  It seems lately that we want to fix things after the damage has been done.  It is also helpful that all the political leaders are on board to do what needs to be done to keep the desertification process from happening.  Although the idea as a whole is huge, I'm impressed by the fact that each country is contributing in their own way.  They are creating a plan that benefits them and works for the green wall project.  Not only does this plan solve the desertification process it can also help with the starving people in the nation.  With the growth of fruit bearing trees coming back into the region it can help begin to feed the nations hungry.

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The Ship-Breakers

The Ship-Breakers | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
In Bangladesh men desperate for work perform one of the world’s most dangerous jobs.

Via Seth Dixon
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Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, June 4, 9:28 PM

Despite massive advances in transporting goods rapidly around our ever increasing connected world, little thought is spared for how we mamage the waste stream. MEDC benefitf rom accessing the range of goods but LEDC have to deal with the dismantling of the transport modes. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 19, 12:38 PM

This article shows what happens when the tools of globalization start to decay and how an industry exist based solely on the waste removal of another. In Bangladesh, a very profitable business of breaking down old ships exist providing much needed jobs but also costing men their lives because the ships are built with poisonous materials. In the article a key point is raised, many of the ships come from the West, an activist states that in the West, they would never allow ships to be broken down polluting their beaches and poisoning their workers but it is ok in Bangladesh. This is critical when thinking about globalization and how it impacts everyone around the globe. As the West becomes more wealthy they can afford to focus on environmental and worker protection but in developing countries they are forced to do things that harm their environment and population because that is the only option they have available to them. In developing countries entire industries have been constructed to deal with the waste left over from the developed world.  

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 20, 1:32 PM

I'm not even really sure what to say about this besides the fact that is very unfortunate.  Well off countries send their old cargo, tanker and other large ships to poorer countries to be broken down for a lot cheaper than it costs them to have it done in their home country.  Since safety doesn't take priority in countries such as Bangladesh the cost to have a ship pulled apart is a lot cheaper.  These people have an extremely dangerous job, the falling steel, the gas buildup causing fires and other general unsafe working conditions lead these workers to have the potential to die every day.  There job is basically to take apart a ship that was meant to be indestructible.  Doing this is extremely dangerous.  The problem seems to be that these people in Bangladesh need the jobs so bad that they can't so much worry about the possibility of death, as long as they get their check at the end of the week.  Not only are there unsafe working conditions for these workers but the toxic chemicals that are used in the construction of these vessels are getting into the environment and creating more problems for Bangladeshi's down the road. 

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WATCH: Iceberg 6 times the size of Manhattan on the move in Antarctic

WATCH: Iceberg 6 times the size of Manhattan on the move in Antarctic | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
A large iceberg that broke off the Pine Island Glacier in early November is making its way to the Southern Ocean and scientists are keeping a close eye on it.
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5 Arguments That Will Convince You the Keystone XL Pipeline Is a Bad Idea

5 Arguments That Will Convince You the Keystone XL Pipeline Is a Bad Idea | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
The window is closing on your chance to tell Obama to oppose the controversial pipeline.
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NASA Sun-Earth Video Wins International Science Challenge

NASA Sun-Earth Video Wins International Science Challenge | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
"Dynamic Earth," a video created by staffers at NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio and their colleagues, took first prize in the 2013 International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge.
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