Geography for All!
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Geography for All!
Geography that affects YOU!
Curated by Trisha Klancar
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EnviroAtlas

EnviroAtlas | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

EnviroAtlas is a collection of interactive tools and resources that allows users to explore the many benefits people receive from nature, often referred to as ecosystem services. Key components of EnviroAtlas include the following:

A multi-scaled Interactive Map with broad scale data for the lower 48 states and fine scale data for selected communitiesThe Eco-Health Relationship Browser, which shows the linkages between ecosystems, the services they provide, and human healthEcosystem services information, GIS and analysis tools, and written resources
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steve smith's curator insight, May 23, 2014 3:59 PM

This looks great, will be having a play with this soon !

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, May 24, 2014 3:38 PM

Enviro Atlas. Mapa Interactivo.

Allan Tsuda's curator insight, May 25, 2014 9:21 PM

Unbelievable, tremendous resource. I wish I had this one growing up. It is a US gov site (EPA), and is for US geography. I'm betting you can search around for similar sites for other locales around the world. Great demo. Demo runs on Adobe Captivate. The demo took a little bit of time to load on a wired connection through a high speed fiber optic connection. Or skip the demo and play around with the maps. Site not all that fast. Still, it's worth waiting for if you want the data.

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Tsunami in Japan 2011

"This video captures some amazing footage of the 2011 tsunami in Japan."


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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 7:17 PM

Most people do not realize the sheer power of a tsunami. It has the force of the entire ocean depth behind each wave. It also pours onto land for hours until it stops then pours back into the ocean for another hour or so. Most people killed are killed by objects such as cars and buildings crushing them. Seeing videos such as these can help people get a better idea of the forces actually involved and maybe save lives.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:33 PM

I hope something like this never happens again. Tsunamis are unreal. They are literally horrifying and to see something like this captured on camera is actually really scary. Damn plate tectonics and people living on the water front.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 1:52 PM

So, I will never forget this morning because my brother was living in Japan at the time and I remember getting a text from him saying "we are ok."  My brother is a bit of a jokester so I figured he had something up his sleeve, however, when I woke up and heard of the destruction, I was so relieved to know he and his family were safe.  For the next month my brother flew rescue missions and brought water and food to the survivors.  He had taken hundred of pictures, and I was able to witness first hand how devastating the tsunami had been.  My heart still goes out to those people, and I am forever grateful that my brother is alive and well.

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Stories Displayed on Maps

Stories Displayed on Maps | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

Ok...So this is neat... Only thing is you must SIGN IN with a social media account or SIGN UP. ... It is free.

Cool way to create a visual, moving timeline. For the moment I might use this more in HIstory,but the door is completely open!

 

On myHistro you can create advanced geolocated timelines that you can play as presentations. Pin your events, videos and photos to the map and share them with friends and family.

 

This new resource, myHistro, combines interactive maps with timelines to organize stories, journeys or historical events as the move over time and place.  By embedding photos, videos and links this creates an incredibly dynamic platform for telling historical and geographic stories.  By combining these features, this is a powerful tool to create customized resources for you students.  Pictured above is a sample timeline that shows the spatial and temporal journey of the Olympic torch for the 2012 Games.   


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benjamin costello's curator insight, May 20, 5:38 PM

Interesting concept but not totally fleshed out for use by historians... genealogists perhaps would have a better or easier time using this program. It is very interesting but it only allows for one movement, so rather than showing the history of a nation you can show the history of a family through its interactive timelines. Google maps is not always accurate as well. 

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World of Geography at your fingertips

World of Geography at your fingertips | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

I LOVE THIS!! Can't wait to use it!

 

Worth exploring...this isn't just a single random link.  Geocube is a portal to numerous topics, regions and themes.  

Having been voted by the American Association of School Librarians as one of the "Top 25 websites for Teaching and Learning," Geocube comes highly recommended, and rightfully so (see: http://www.ala.org/aasl/guidelinesandstandards/bestlist/bestwebsitestop25?mid=53 ).  This is a must-see. 


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The Great Green Wall

The Great Green Wall | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
The Great Green Wall initiative uses an integrated approach to restore a diversity of ecosystems to the North African landscape.

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Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 11:56 AM

I like the idea of these countries who face the same issues joining together to combat and find a solution for there problems with climate change, desertion, gentrification. I like the idea of the African continent joining arms in order to address the same issues there neighboring countries face. While Africa is always portrayed as a land ridden with war and strife with one another, this great image of all these nations uniting is a positive move towards a bright future for the continent. 

Danielle Lip's curator insight, March 15, 2:37 PM

The Great Green Wall is not actually a wall nor is it green, this areas is very dry, having no negation or biodiversity. Yet eleven countries are banning together where this "wall" coexists and they place to help bring the native plants back to life. The eleven countries that this Great Wall is included in are the Sahel-Sahara region—Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Sudan, Chad, Niger, Nigeria, Mali, Burkina Faso, Mauritania, and Senegal. The focus area in these countries will become reproduced and the living conditions in these countries will grow and become full of life once again. I believe that it is very important to keep the environment alive and well because it makes for attractive living as well as a healthy life because oxygen comes from the plants and the air.

A point made in the article said that "We want to replicate and scale up these achievements across the region. It’s very possible to restore trees to a landscape and to restore agroforestrypractices without planting any trees." I liked this statement because it shows that the people in the countries are actually going to try and I find that very important. If you lived in one of the eleven countries would you want to live in a dried up area with no places or life?

Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 25, 3:53 PM

Poor climate and poor land management such as over farming, and overgrazing has led to a significant decline in arable land in the Sahel region. Under the Great Green Wall initiative scientists are working to restore land that used to be rich with diverse plant life. Eleven countries; Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Sudan, Chad, Niger, Nigeria, Mali, Burkina Faso, Mauritania, and Senegal have joined the Great Green Wall Initiative and are working to reduce land degradation and restore their native plant life. Hopefully this ties in with my last article on the food shortages of the Sahel.

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Welcome to 'Geography Education'

Welcome to 'Geography Education' | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

Finding Materials: This site is designed for geography students and teachers to find interesting, current supplemental materials.  To search for place-specific posts, browse this interactive map.  To search for thematic posts, see http://geographyeducation.org/thematic/ (organized by the APHG curriculum).  Also you can search for a keyword by clicking on the filter tab above.

 

Staying Connected: You can receive post updates in the way that best fits how you use social media.

Update Notifications: Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Google+.

              Email: Click 'follow' button at top right of this page.

Sites with Content: Wordpress, Scoop.it.


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SRINIVAS KASULLA's comment, August 31, 2013 2:19 PM
Awsome liked the map and would like to contribute ....thanks for such a nice article Peters Energy :)
SRINIVAS KASULLA's comment, August 31, 2013 2:19 PM
Awsome liked the map and would like to contribute ....thanks for such a nice article Peters Energy :)
Thomas C. Thompson's curator insight, August 31, 2013 7:51 PM

Love this Geography Education site! Set up two ways: regionally and thematically so you can find lesson ideas easily.

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A History of Conflicts

A History of Conflicts | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

 So there are a few missing...but still a fun interactive resource for teachers and kids.

 

Browse the timeline of war and conflict across the globe.

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click the both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.     


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Sakis Koukouvis's comment, August 16, 2012 8:06 AM
Oh... You are lucky ;-)
Paul Rymsza's comment, August 22, 2012 2:15 PM
the potential of this site is amazing between the interactive learning system and the correlation between the timeline and location. If the human geography class is anything like this i can't wait for it!
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 28, 2013 3:34 PM

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.