Geography for All!
Follow
Find tag "statistics"
1.2K views | +0 today
Geography for All!
Geography that affects YOU!
Curated by Trisha Klancar
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Trisha Klancar from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

 

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial patterns within the global dataset (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings in distinct place and when analyzed at various scales). It is also a fantastic way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model.

 

Tags: population, scale, visualization, Demographics, models, unit 2 population, sustainability, regions, spatial.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:55 PM

Unit 2

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:03 PM

This video describes and explains how we got to a population of 7 billion people so fast

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:04 PM

It also uses water to demonstrate it.

Rescooped by Trisha Klancar from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Issues from Global Population Growth

Find In-depth Review, Video And Infographic On World Population. http://www.mapsofworld.com/poll/can-world-population-be-controlled.html Learn more about pop...

 

This video displays some intriguing statistics about global population growth.  Equally important the video explores some concerns that are presented with a large population.  Click on the above link to view all the images as one long infographic.  Admittedly, this video (and most academic literature) approaches the population issue from a strong perspective which advocates for the reduction of total population; if you feel it necessary to have an ideological counterweight in the classroom, this article may be what you are looking for: http://opinion.latimes.com/opinionla/2011/07/overpopulation-dont-buy-more-people-more-problems-blowback.html  


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Trisha Klancar from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Population clock for every country

Population clock for every country | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
Real time statistics for current population of any country. Real time data on population, births, deaths, net migration and population growth.

 

This site shows various demographic statistics for every country including some based on projections in demographic trends in the given country.  If the current trends hold (which they won't, but that is still an interesting measure), the entire Japanese population will disappear in 1,000 years according to this Global Post article: http://www.globalpost.com/dispatches/news/regions/asia-pacific/japan/population-clock-shows-japan-faces-extinction-1000-years


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 27, 2014 10:17 PM

In AP Human Geo., this article relates to the population growth theme because it utilizes all of the indicators we learned in this class, including CBR, CDR, net migration rates, and population growth rates.

Riley Tuggle's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:51 AM

I believe India has more men than women because sometimes when women can't have a son for their first or second child, the men would beat the women to death, or in some instances women are captured and sold for wives, and they may commit suicide they are so depressed. Also, some pregnant women find out their baby is a girl, they would aport or abandon her because sons are apparently more important and successful because they would stay home and take care of their parents when they are elderly and they would carry on the families name. -rt

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:22 AM

This is fantastic - have a look at various countries and their 'rate' of growth