Geography for All!
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Geography for All!
Geography that affects YOU!
Curated by Trisha Klancar
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Sorting the Real Sandy Photos From the Fakes

Sorting the Real Sandy Photos From the Fakes | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
A pictorial investigation bureau, at your service.

 

Social media has fundamentally changed how information is disseminated.  Many photos that are spread on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest can be 'doctored' or mislabeled since citizen journalists aren't held to the same standard of verifying their sources.  In the abundance of information, sorting out fact from fiction can be quite difficult.  Social media has made me a more of a skeptic, and I try not to post a picture that I it can't find it's original source.     


Via Seth Dixon
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Rescooped by Trisha Klancar from Geography Education
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The Scale of the Universe

The Scale of the Universe | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

This is really neat...a different way to give perspective !

 

"Zoom from the edge of the universe to the quantum foam of spacetime and learn about everything in between."

 

Click "Start," and then use the slider across the bottom, or the wheel on your mouse, to zoom in -- and in and in and in... or out and out and out... It will take you from the very smallest features postulated by scientists (the strings in string theory) to the very largest (the observable universe). This really is a fabulous visual demonstration of scale at micro and macro levels. This is an excellent way to bring spatial thinking into the math curriculum as well.

 

Tags: Scale, perspective, space, spatial, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples.


Via Seth Dixon
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Mark V's comment, September 10, 2012 2:38 PM
I felt that this is an excellent way to understand spatial thinking which is important in many areas beyond geography.
Joe Andrade's curator insight, July 7, 2013 10:08 PM

This is a great method of teaching some of the principals behind understanding spatial analysis. An important skill in understanding the world we live in.

Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 9, 2013 7:50 AM

Click "Start," and then use the slider across the bottom, or the wheel on your mouse, to zoom in -- and in and in and in... or out and out and out... It will take you from the very smallest features postulated by scientists (the strings in string theory) to the very largest (the observable universe). This really is a fabulous visual demonstration of scale at micro and macro levels. This is an excellent way to bring spatial thinking into the math curriculum as well.


Tags: Scale, perspective, space, spatial, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

Rescooped by Trisha Klancar from Geography Education
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The True Size Of Africa

The True Size Of Africa | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

This is another old classic image that I might have shared earlier but it merits repeating. As Salvatore Natoli (a leader in geography education) once said, "In our society we unconsciously equate size with importance and even power." This is one reason why many people have underestimated the true size of Africa relative to places that they view as more important or more powerful.


Tags: mapping, Africa, perspective, images. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Afrikasources's curator insight, January 15, 2014 10:10 AM

Just a reminder

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 11:01 AM

It is incredible big, but unfortunately most of the north area is cover by the big Sahara and most of the are is typically unfertilized. 

Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 9, 2015 4:29 PM

As we can see, there's a little overlapping here and some empty spots but it's pretty accurate. The United States and China are in the top 5 largest countries of the world list and they still fit in the 2nd largest continent of the world, Africa. I'd like to see the size comparison between Africa and Russia. I did some research on that and it turns out that Russia is a little over half the size of Africa, maybe the size of the combination of the United States and China.